IN THE NEWS

Oil

NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Researchers for the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) have found that sponging a dog in a solution of 1 1/2 ounces of human bath oil called Avon's Skin So Soft to a gallon of water will cut flea infestation by more than 40 percent. The scientists put a counted number of fleas on each dog, sponged the dogs with the "woodland fragrance," and counted the parasites the next day. Voila! Many of the fleas had fled. The researchers for the association, which represents 14,000 veterinarians practicing small-animal medicine in this country, say that the fleas have a keen sense of smell, and the scientists speculate that the fleas leave because they don't like the product's aroma.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The thieves had pulled a white van up to the back of the snazzy Chestnut Street restaurant Buddakan. Were they stealing cash, or the giant golden Buddha? A stash of the popular "dip sum" doughnuts? Nope. They were after the used cooking oil. With biodiesel production increasing and prices for feedstocks - including used cooking oil - soaring, a waste product that restaurants once paid to get rid of is now a commodity targeted by thieves. Greenworks Holdings, a group of companies that collect used cooking oil and convert it into biofuel, serves about 13,000 restaurants, mostly in the northeastern states.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
EDDYSTONE A waterfront rail terminal in Eddystone, a small Delaware County borough, will soon become a major center for transporting crude oil to area refineries. While officials applaud the project as a boost to the local economy, they also point to the threat of a disaster in the state's growing oil-by-rail industry. "Make no mistake," said former U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon. "An incident involving rail transport of oil will occur in the commonwealth, and lives, including first responders' lives, and property will be put at risk.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1988 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mobil Oil Corp. said yesterday its planned capital improvements of $75 million at its Paulsboro refinery will include a cogeneration plant capable of satisfying the refinery's power needs. Mark Cohen, a Mobil spokesman, said the new cogeneration plant, in addition to a new facility for blending and packaging lubrication oil, demonstrates Mobil's commitment to the Paulsboro refinery. Mobil, like other firms with refineries in the Northeast, has responded to foreign competition by streamlining its own facilities.
NEWS
February 6, 2006
President Bush said in his State of the Union address that America is addicted to oil. We take you now to a meeting at an undisclosed location, where participants are struggling with a 12-step program: Dr. Bob: Welcome, everyone. Do we have any new members tonight? George: Yes. Howdy. My name is George. And my country is addicted to oil. Group (in unison): Hi, George. Dr. Bob: Welcome to our anonymous group, George. Our program for recovery consists of 12 steps. The first step is to admit we are powerless over oil. Are you ready to admit you're powerless?
NEWS
October 23, 1986 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
The crews were out along Boathouse Row and the fish were biting along the Schuylkill. Little remained by late yesterday of a 3 1/2-mile-long oil slick on the river but scattered gooey pools, the targets of cleanup booms near city water intakes. The Belmont intake off West River Drive was to remain shut down overnight but the Water Department said none of the heavy industrial-grade heating oil got into the water supply. "We've got plenty of water," said department spokeswoman Joan Fredette.
NEWS
April 8, 1986 | By David Osterfeld (David Osterfeld is a professor and fellow of the Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.)
The price of oil has fallen from $29 a barrel in November 1985 to $13 in March 1986, a drop of over 50 percent in four months. We are now in the midst of a worldwide oil glut. But how is this possible? After all, in the 1970s we were told that oil is a nonrenewable resource that was on the verge of depletion. Oil could only become more scarce. A glut was not only unthinkable but also logically impossible. But the "impossible" has occurred. How? The doomsday predictions were based on a "worst case" scenario.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
BELMAR, N.J. - The drill-vs.-spill debate is heating up again. Environmental groups in New Jersey are trying to rally opposition against three bills in Congress that would expand offshore oil and gas drilling. But the pain of $4-a-gallon gasoline is renewing pressure from supporters of drilling to do more to add to the nation's energy supplies. A bill that would reopen offshore drilling in Virginia and the Gulf of Mexico passed the Republican-controlled House of Representatives on Thursday with mostly Republican support, 266-149, with 17 abstentions.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Cleanup workers have blocked off three New Jersey creeks and are watching a wildlife refuge along the Delaware River for any signs of environmental damage from an oil spill at Wilmington. An estimated 10,000 gallons of lightweight oil and volatile chemicals gushed into the Christina River Wednesday night, forcing the Coast Guard to limit traffic on the Delaware and block off the Christina with floating booms. Booms also were placed yesterday across the entrances to Oldmans Creek, about five miles above the Christina, Raccoon Creek, about eight miles above, and the Salem Canal, just below it. Downriver, small streaks of oil stretched beyond New Castle, Del., to Pea Patch Island, near the Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Salem County, N.J. "Down there, it was just a light sheen, so the impact there is probably going to be very minimal," said Coast Guard spokesman Gary Croot.
NEWS
September 7, 2006
So America has struck oil again. It's a blessing and a curse. Three companies led by Chevron Corp. announced Tuesday what could be the biggest domestic discovery since Alaska's Prudhoe Bay nearly 40 years ago. A well drilled 29,000 feet under the Gulf of Mexico could yield up to 15 billion barrels of oil, boosting U.S. reserves by half. What a relief. The United States needs a supplier other than hostile, unstable regimes overseas. It's why President Bush supports drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
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