IN THE NEWS

Oil

NEWS
January 27, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Cleanup workers have blocked off three New Jersey creeks and are watching a wildlife refuge along the Delaware River for any signs of environmental damage from an oil spill at Wilmington. An estimated 10,000 gallons of lightweight oil and volatile chemicals gushed into the Christina River Wednesday night, forcing the Coast Guard to limit traffic on the Delaware and block off the Christina with floating booms. Booms also were placed yesterday across the entrances to Oldmans Creek, about five miles above the Christina, Raccoon Creek, about eight miles above, and the Salem Canal, just below it. Downriver, small streaks of oil stretched beyond New Castle, Del., to Pea Patch Island, near the Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Salem County, N.J. "Down there, it was just a light sheen, so the impact there is probably going to be very minimal," said Coast Guard spokesman Gary Croot.
NEWS
September 7, 2006
So America has struck oil again. It's a blessing and a curse. Three companies led by Chevron Corp. announced Tuesday what could be the biggest domestic discovery since Alaska's Prudhoe Bay nearly 40 years ago. A well drilled 29,000 feet under the Gulf of Mexico could yield up to 15 billion barrels of oil, boosting U.S. reserves by half. What a relief. The United States needs a supplier other than hostile, unstable regimes overseas. It's why President Bush supports drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Councilman Leland M. Beloff has been implicated in a theater owner's alleged plot to spread a foul-smelling liquid called "skunk oil" in a competitor's theater, according to testimony in federal court. Nicholas Marrandino, a former aide to Beloff, told of Beloff's role during his testimony Monday in the trial of Steven B. Fox, the owner of the Bala Theater in Bala Cynwyd and 21 other theaters in the region. Fox was indicted last fall on charges that he tried to force the Narberth Theater, which is about two miles from the Bala, out of business in part by hiring Marrandino for $100 to spread the skunk oil to drive patrons away.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
South Philadelphia will get its own oil well early next year when the Sun Co. kick-starts an old pumping system to begin cleaning up plumes of petroleum underground. The pumps will begin pulling up oil - believed to lie several feet thick in some locations - as part of a multimillion-dollar consent agreement to be signed today by Sun and the Department of Environmental Resources. The recovery well is among the first steps spelled out in the 10-year agreement, which also calls for studies to find out if petroleum is seeping off the site or into the deep reservoir of groundwater under the refinery.
FOOD
November 18, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: How can I get oil-spill stains off the floor of my carport? - Mrs. N.P. If the oil is fresh, you can absorb it easily with cat litter. Apply a thick layer - either of the cedarized sawdust type or ordinary clay litter; avoid the new type that hardens into lumps upon contact with moisture - to the floor, completely covering the oil. Let set 15 minutes so the litter can absorb the oil. Sweep up the oil-soaked litter with a broom, and rinse the remaining residue with water or use a mild detergent solution to wash the floor.
NEWS
June 16, 2010 | McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The runaway Deepwater Horizon well is pouring 35,000 to 60,000 barrels a day of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, the Obama administration said yesterday. The new estimate means that hundreds of thousands of barrels of oil will flow into the Gulf in the next several weeks until BP completes a plan that it hopes will collect 60,000 to 80,000 barrels daily. That plan won't be fully implemented until the middle of next month. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, a Nobel laureate in physics, called the new estimate "a significant step forward in our effort to put a number on the oil that is escaping from BP's well.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Senator Bob Casey (D., Pa.), reacting to growing anxiety over fiery railroad derailments of crude-oil tankers, on Monday pushed for legislation that could provide new resources and training to emergency personnel. "This legislation is a commonsense approach that could give our first responders more training and the additional resources they need," Casey said at a news conference in Philadelphia. The RESPONSE Act, written by U.S. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), would establish a subcommittee under the Federal Emergency Management Agency's National Advisory Council to address training of first responders, particularly in smaller communities.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Mike Austin knew it was bad when his cellphone buzzed after 12:30 a.m. Quickly, he scribbled notes and called a coworker: "Train derailment. Seven cars. It's on a bridge. I'm going to need help. " Then he hopped into his white Chevrolet Suburban and drove 21/2 hours from a sleepy Baltimore suburb toward Philadelphia, to which derailment experts from around the country were being summoned. Their task: Remove tens of thousands of gallons of crude oil and more than 1.8 million pounds of train cars from atop the Schuylkill Arsenal Bridge.
NEWS
May 27, 2005
ICOULDN'T AGREE more with Carol Towarnicky's op-ed in the Daily News ("When the oil runs out," May 25): We need to plan our energy consumption around the coming supply shortage. To do this, we need to talk less about making our current inefficient cars, other transportation and appliances more pecunious than in changing the way we live our lives. If many of us were able to telecommute, for instance, instead of driving to work, we would not have to have cars. If we had more and smaller places to shop within walking and bicycling distance, and made it expensive to drive to big-box stores that rob our communities, we would have communities like the ones we grew up in, we would get to meet our neighbors, and we would get some fresh air and exercise.
NEWS
February 2, 1986
Richard Drobnick's Jan. 27 Op-ed Page article, proposing a variable tax on the price of oil, with proceeds to be used to lower the deficit, pays little attention to the main objection that should be raised to such an idea. Mr. Drobnick should take time to remember that the current glut in this finite resource will not last long, but the governmental spending attitudes that allowed for this current deficit will outlive us all unless something is done to change these attitudes. Providing Congress with a short-term fix to the current problem of governmental excess will only hide this problem and allow it to continue to grow unrestrained by forthright intervention.
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