IN THE NEWS

Oil

NEWS
December 17, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
South Philadelphia will get its own oil well early next year when the Sun Co. kick-starts an old pumping system to begin cleaning up plumes of petroleum underground. The pumps will begin pulling up oil - believed to lie several feet thick in some locations - as part of a multimillion-dollar consent agreement to be signed today by Sun and the Department of Environmental Resources. The recovery well is among the first steps spelled out in the 10-year agreement, which also calls for studies to find out if petroleum is seeping off the site or into the deep reservoir of groundwater under the refinery.
FOOD
November 18, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: How can I get oil-spill stains off the floor of my carport? - Mrs. N.P. If the oil is fresh, you can absorb it easily with cat litter. Apply a thick layer - either of the cedarized sawdust type or ordinary clay litter; avoid the new type that hardens into lumps upon contact with moisture - to the floor, completely covering the oil. Let set 15 minutes so the litter can absorb the oil. Sweep up the oil-soaked litter with a broom, and rinse the remaining residue with water or use a mild detergent solution to wash the floor.
NEWS
June 16, 2010 | McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The runaway Deepwater Horizon well is pouring 35,000 to 60,000 barrels a day of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, the Obama administration said yesterday. The new estimate means that hundreds of thousands of barrels of oil will flow into the Gulf in the next several weeks until BP completes a plan that it hopes will collect 60,000 to 80,000 barrels daily. That plan won't be fully implemented until the middle of next month. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, a Nobel laureate in physics, called the new estimate "a significant step forward in our effort to put a number on the oil that is escaping from BP's well.
NEWS
August 16, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH - University of Pittsburgh researchers say the number of properties in Allegheny County that were leased for oil and gas exploration increased by 322 percent from 2008 to 2009. University officials used data from the county's Department of Real Estate to look at land leased for such exploration between 2003 and May 2010. Researchers said in findings released Monday that more than 2,000 parcels of land, or 7 percent of land in the county, has been leased for drilling since 2003.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Mike Austin knew it was bad when his cellphone buzzed after 12:30 a.m. Quickly, he scribbled notes and called a coworker: "Train derailment. Seven cars. It's on a bridge. I'm going to need help. " Then he hopped into his white Chevrolet Suburban and drove 21/2 hours from a sleepy Baltimore suburb toward Philadelphia, to which derailment experts from around the country were being summoned. Their task: Remove tens of thousands of gallons of crude oil and more than 1.8 million pounds of train cars from atop the Schuylkill Arsenal Bridge.
NEWS
May 27, 2005
ICOULDN'T AGREE more with Carol Towarnicky's op-ed in the Daily News ("When the oil runs out," May 25): We need to plan our energy consumption around the coming supply shortage. To do this, we need to talk less about making our current inefficient cars, other transportation and appliances more pecunious than in changing the way we live our lives. If many of us were able to telecommute, for instance, instead of driving to work, we would not have to have cars. If we had more and smaller places to shop within walking and bicycling distance, and made it expensive to drive to big-box stores that rob our communities, we would have communities like the ones we grew up in, we would get to meet our neighbors, and we would get some fresh air and exercise.
NEWS
February 2, 1986
Richard Drobnick's Jan. 27 Op-ed Page article, proposing a variable tax on the price of oil, with proceeds to be used to lower the deficit, pays little attention to the main objection that should be raised to such an idea. Mr. Drobnick should take time to remember that the current glut in this finite resource will not last long, but the governmental spending attitudes that allowed for this current deficit will outlive us all unless something is done to change these attitudes. Providing Congress with a short-term fix to the current problem of governmental excess will only hide this problem and allow it to continue to grow unrestrained by forthright intervention.
NEWS
March 11, 1987 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theater owner Steven B. Fox was convicted yesterday of conspiring with City Councilman Leland M. Beloff in late 1984 to spread a foul-smelling liquid called "skunk oil" inside a theater owned by a competitor. Fox, owner of the Bala Theater in Bala Cynwyd and 21 other theaters in the region, was found guilty of conspiracy and attempted extortion by U.S. District Judge Edmund V. Ludwig despite his assertion that the plan was intended primarily as a practical joke. Ludwig, who heard the case without a jury, fined Fox $5,000.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | Associated Press
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - A jeweler was sentenced yesterday to at least 25 years in prison for incinerating his wife in an oil drum, but not before he called the judge prejudiced, the prosecutor incompetent and his wife's family and friends a "lynch mob. " At an extraordinary sentencing in Westchester County Court, Werner Lippe said he was convicted on "assumptions, speculations and lies. " Reading from handwritten notes on a legal pad, and quoting from U.S. Supreme Court decisions, the combative convict said he should not have been found guilty because his three recorded confessions were involuntary and there was no other evidence.
NEWS
December 5, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For one man, on one day, amid the rush and expanse of the cleanup, this is what the effect of the spill came down to: A tiny blotch on a single tail feather, the one all the way to the left, on a single eagle. Late Friday afternoon, Bruce McWhorter, a biologist for the conservation group New Jersey Audubon Society, trained his scope on a bald eagle that had just swooped onto a branch of a sweet gum tree at the edge of Wiggins Pond, just inland from the Delaware River near Gibbstown, Gloucester County.
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