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Oil

NEWS
May 9, 2014
LAURIE DAVID'S favorite healthy snack from The Family Cooks is Roasted Cauliflower Popcorn. Start with one large cauliflower, cored and separated into popcorn-size florets. You'll also need 3 tablespoons olive oil and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt or other favorite seasoning. Preheat the oven to 450. Toss the cauliflower with the olive oil and seasoning in a bowl, coating the florets. Use the rest of the oil to coat a baking sheet. Spread cauliflower on sheet and roast for 30 minutes or until crispy brown.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2002, Collingswood Presbyterian Church "published a booklet describing all the stained glass windows in the church," Raymond H. Perry III said in an interview. The 22-page work celebrated the "major effort by the church to raise enough money to replace windows that needed to be replaced," he said. "There are not that many churches that have as many" stained glass windows showing the story of Jesus. Perry said his father "thought it should be memorialized," so after all the windows were replaced, Raymond H. Perry Jr. wrote the text and photographed them all for the pamphlet.
FOOD
May 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a child, Elaine Sirna Shaughnessy never liked the smell of perfume. Too unnatural. But she happily inhaled whatever wafted from her mother's kitchen in Delaware Township, later to become Cherry Hill. Especially on Sunday mornings, before church, when Mom made "gravy" for the week. Those scents were very pleasurable, and may have been a subconscious trigger for the turn her life would take in the mid-1980s. That was when Shaughnessy, a stressed-out school administrator, read an article about aromatherapy, a form of alternative medicine using fragrant "essential oils" distilled from plants.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
THE shagbark hickory, distinctive for its shedding bark, is a common tree in southeastern Pennsylvania. SHAGBARK HICKORY SYRUP 2 pounds shagbark hickory bark 2 cups granulated sugar Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Scrub bark thoroughly in clean water to remove debris. Break bark into roughly 8-inch pieces and place on a baking sheet. Toast bark until slightly brown and toasty smelling, about 25 minutes. Place bark in a large pot and add enough water to cover by one inch.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sage Piszek heard that the first barrel of used cooking oil was full, he was puzzled. Already? Maybe rain had somehow seeped in. But when he checked, it was full ... of oil. That told Piszek that the project in South Philadelphia's Indonesian community, the first of its kind in the region, was working. On Tuesday, officials - including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's regional administrator - and community members gathered for a ceremonial pump-out of that first barrel.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., one of the state's most prolific Marcellus Shale natural gas producers, is giving $2.5 million to Lackawanna College in Scranton to boost its School of Petroleum and Natural Gas. The gift is the largest single private donation in the history of the two-year college. Lackawanna College established the school in 2009 in the Susquehanna County borough of New Milford, near the heart of Cabot's drilling activity. "Our partnership with Cabot enhances tremendously the ability of the School of Petroleum and Natural Gas to provide a world-class education designed to prepare a ready workforce that fits the needs of the multiple companies across the industry," Mark Volk, the college's president, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE MEMORY is as clear as day in Rabbi Arthur Waskow's mind. It was sometime in 2010, and he was at a beach, watching his young granddaughter frolic with seagulls along the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. His mind drifted to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and he wondered what kind of world his granddaughter would inherit, what kind of environmental disasters she'd witness. Waskow said that haunting thought inspired him to be a part of a multifaith crowd that gathered in Center City yesterday to protest the dangers of trains that carry crude oil through Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
EDDYSTONE A waterfront rail terminal in Eddystone, a small Delaware County borough, will soon become a major center for transporting crude oil to area refineries. While officials applaud the project as a boost to the local economy, they also point to the threat of a disaster in the state's growing oil-by-rail industry. "Make no mistake," said former U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon. "An incident involving rail transport of oil will occur in the commonwealth, and lives, including first responders' lives, and property will be put at risk.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new owners of the former NuStar Asphalt refinery in Paulsboro plan to upgrade the Gloucester County facility to take advantage of the growing cross-country shipments of crude oil by rail. Axeon Specialty Products L.L.C., the new name adopted this week by the San Antonio company that operates the refinery, says it intends to make "new, substantial investments" in its 70,000-barrel-a-day operation in Paulsboro, including new rail unloading facilities. The Paulsboro plant now can receive only a small number of railcars at one time, said Rod Pullen, a senior vice president at Axeon SP. The aim is to add more unloading capacity so that Axeon can order cost-efficient unit trains - 100-car trains that carry a single commodity to a single destination.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A key power plant on the Center City steam loop that supplies the area around Thomas Jefferson University Hospital ran perilously short of fuel oil last week, prompting state and local officials to help arrange a rescue. Veolia Energy officials said a new oil supplier failed to deliver fuel to its Edison Station plant at 908 Sansom St., which provides high-pressure steam to the eastern part of Veolia's district heating system. Michael Smedley, Veolia's regional vice president, said the system that serves dozens of city hospitals, universities, and Center City office towers was in no danger of losing heat.
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