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Oil

BUSINESS
February 3, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The drop in oil prices may have an upside: Historically, the S&P 500's performance is mixed during a radical oil-price sell-off, but it rebounds an average of 23 percent 12 months later. So notes Chuck Widger, founder and chairman of Brinker Capital, who generally keeps a low profile despite his $17 billion investment firm in Berwyn and his long performance record. Widger has a new book out: Personal Benchmark (Wiley, 2014), coauthored with behavioral-finance expert Daniel Crosby.
FOOD
January 30, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
As Vetri chef Alicia Walter prepared for a recent seven-week trip to study olive oil production in the Mediterranean, she was warned that it wouldn't be pretty. The industry had a rough year, blamed on too much rain in some areas and not enough in others. An olive-eating fruit fly had ravaged crops in Italy and left a dent in Greek olive orchards, as well. Still, she didn't realize how bleak the situation was until she walked into the groves and talked with the devastated families who relied on olive oil for their livelihood.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The slowdown in domestic oil drilling is spilling over into the Marcellus Shale natural-gas region. Several large drilling companies have announced plans to reduce 2015 capital-spending plans in Appalachia in response to low energy prices. Some producers and service companies have already announced layoffs. "There's a tightening of capital," said David J. Spigelmyer, president of the Marcellus Shale Coalition, the industry trade group. "Cap-ex [capital expenditure] programs have declined fairly significantly here in the first quarter.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
How long will we enjoy gas below $2 a gallon, or oil below $50 a barrel? "I wouldn't bet on more than a year," Philip Rinaldi, who runs Philadelphia Energy Solutions and its big refinery, storage, and shipping complex in South Philadelphia, told Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce members at their yearly economic forecast breakfast Wednesday. But, like a Wall Street trader, Philadelphia could benefit from Marcellus Shale gas and oil whether world prices rise or fall, Rinaldi added.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If you're brave enough to think oil stocks have been fairly repriced, here are some ideas on how to play the sector. First, here's an exchange-traded fund that broadly represents the energy industry: Energy Select Sector SPDR (symbol: XLE). Its top holdings include ExxonMobil, Chevron, Schlumberger, ConocoPhillips, and EOG Resources. Ernie Cecilia, chief investment officer of Bryn Mawr Trust, instead is buying shares in individual low-cost producers such as EOG and ExxonMobil, he says, as the latter company "can make money with oil even at $40 a barrel.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
American Airlines and merger partner US Airways could enjoy more than $2.5 billion in "tailwinds" in 2015 because Philadelphia's dominant airline does not hedge its jet-fuel costs and does not have profit-sharing with employees, a Wall Street analyst said Friday. American is one of the few major airlines that does not buy hedges, which are futures contracts that lock in fuel prices in advance. Declining oil prices should be worth at least $1.3 billion to American, airline analyst Hunter Keay of Wolfe Research L.L.C.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Sometimes it seems as if America, at 238 years old, is suffering from a sort of midlife crisis that has it questioning its strength and leadership. Questioning is fine; few are pleased with Washington these days. But it was more troubling to hear some critics suggest that President Obama should be more like Russian President Vladimir Putin. Some were apparently impressed by the machismo Putin displayed in invading Ukraine even though it was morally wrong. Much of that sentiment evaporated as casualties mounted in the war Putin incited to keep Ukraine firmly in Russia's orbit rather than the European Union's.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Ain't it grand that oil prices are dropping? Yes and no. For consumers, yes, the 40 percent drop, down to $55 or so per barrel, amounts to a massive income boost. Each penny drop in gas prices at the pump equals $1.4 billion a year in extra disposable income, according to Bill Dunkelberg, professor of economics at Temple University. The best part, he says, is that American dollars aren't leaving the country like they did in 2008, when $150-per-barrel oil enriched OPEC nations. "Now we're going to start collecting those oil revenues here when prices rebound," he adds.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oil prices recently dropped to five-year lows, and consumers are reaping the benefits when they fill up at the gas pump. But they are not seeing the same good deals on airfares, which are at the same levels as when crude was above $100 a barrel. Airlines are not passing on their fuel savings to customers for several reasons. First, demand for air travel remains strong, and planes are full. With an improving economy, people have more disposable income. "What's the incentive to lower fares?"
NEWS
December 19, 2014
ISSUE | CONGRESS Maiden budget effort a bad sign Once again, our supposed leaders brought us to the brink of a government shutdown as another short-term spending plan was about to expire, the members scrambling to put into place another eleventh-hour agreement so that they could begin their lengthy holiday recess ("Congress passes $1.1 trillion bill," Dec. 14). There was no possibility that a clean spending blueprint would be proposed. Rather, we found shenanigans, an unwillingness to fund the Department of Homeland Security for more than a few months, and special-interest poison pills inserted into the legislation that were unrelated to the matter at hand, but provisions that a sufficient number of Democrats were willing to accept.
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