IN THE NEWS

Oil

BUSINESS
July 25, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines said Wednesday that its Trainer oil refinery in Delaware County produced a $13 million profit in the second quarter. Delta, the first U.S. airline to report earnings, posted a second-quarter profit of $889 million, or $1.04 a share, that beat analysts' estimates, driven by strong passenger demand and higher revenue from corporate contracts. Revenue rose 9.4 percent to $10.6 billion. "We will post even better results in the third quarter, with a forecast operating margin of 15 percent to 17 percent," Delta chief executive officer Richard Anderson said on a conference call.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines' subsidiary Monroe Energy L.L.C. has signed a five-year agreement with a Texas-based company, Bridger L.L.C., to receive 65,000 barrels of domestic crude a day at its oil refinery in Trainer, Delaware County. The contract will supply about one-third of the crude refined daily at the former ConocoPhillips refinery, which Delta bought in 2012. The Trainer refinery supplies Delta's Northeast operations with jet fuel, the largest and most volatile expense for airlines.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A YEAR AGO, 47 lives were lost in Quebec during a fiery explosion caused by a derailed oil train, and yesterday, about 50 activists demonstrated in Center City to make sure that same kind of tragedy doesn't happen here in Philly. "The only way to truly halt oil trains is to keep it in the ground and turn away from the self-destructive development of fossil fuels," said Tracy Carluccio, deputy director of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network and one of the speakers. "We have to move towards investment on a national scale of renewable, sustainable energy sources and energy efficiency that will support clean and healthy communities.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
By July 2015, all home heating oil sold in Philadelphia would have to meet new sulfur limits unanimously passed Thursday by City Council. The limits would "make a tangible difference in the health of our citizens" by improving air quality, said Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, who sponsored the measure. It now goes to Mayor Nutter, who is expected to sign it. The bill was intended to put the city in alignment with sulfur standards in surrounding states - so the city would not become a dumping ground for dirtier fuel - but the timetable actually moves the city to the forefront.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A measure to reduce sulfur in home heating oil - saving lives and health-care dollars, as well as easing air pollution, its advocates say - passed unanimously out of Philadelphia City Council's environment committee Wednesday and heads to the full Council today. The bill, proposed by Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, would lower the sulfur limit from 2,000 parts per million - a level passed in 1978 - to 15 parts per million, putting the city in line with neighboring states. Only Pennsylvania has a higher limit - 500 parts per million.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The struggle of oil vs. biofuels has split the industrial and political elites in Philadelphia, as it has elsewhere. Delaware River oil refiners and their energetic new owners - Carlyle Group, Delta Airlines, PBF Energy - are doing their part to process the output of the vast, new North American energy fields. Oil arrives here by train, pipe, and barge to fuel what they hope will be an industrial renaissance and a projection of renewed American economic power overseas. Together, these oilmen prevailed on Philadelphia Democrat U.S. Rep. Bob Brady to urge Vice President Biden to help delay Environmental Protection Agency guidelines mandating the use of more ethanol (corn-based alcohol)
NEWS
May 15, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the Delaware River wharf where Appalachian coal trains once unloaded their cargo, 108 rail tankers lined up Tuesday to deliver a new distant energy source - crude oil from North Dakota. The Eddystone Rail Facility, built on leased land surrounding an aging Exelon Corp. power plant, is the latest oil-by-rail facility to open in the area, adding capacity to handle the cheap domestic crude oil that has become the salvation of the region's financially embattled refineries - but has also raised safety concerns about unprecedented rail movements of oil. "If we didn't do what we did, the refineries are gone," said Jack Galloway, who created Eddystone Rail Co. and enlisted Enbridge Inc., one of North America's largest energy distributors, as the operating partner in the project.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
LAURIE DAVID'S favorite healthy snack from The Family Cooks is Roasted Cauliflower Popcorn. Start with one large cauliflower, cored and separated into popcorn-size florets. You'll also need 3 tablespoons olive oil and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt or other favorite seasoning. Preheat the oven to 450. Toss the cauliflower with the olive oil and seasoning in a bowl, coating the florets. Use the rest of the oil to coat a baking sheet. Spread cauliflower on sheet and roast for 30 minutes or until crispy brown.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2002, Collingswood Presbyterian Church "published a booklet describing all the stained glass windows in the church," Raymond H. Perry III said in an interview. The 22-page work celebrated the "major effort by the church to raise enough money to replace windows that needed to be replaced," he said. "There are not that many churches that have as many" stained glass windows showing the story of Jesus. Perry said his father "thought it should be memorialized," so after all the windows were replaced, Raymond H. Perry Jr. wrote the text and photographed them all for the pamphlet.
FOOD
May 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a child, Elaine Sirna Shaughnessy never liked the smell of perfume. Too unnatural. But she happily inhaled whatever wafted from her mother's kitchen in Delaware Township, later to become Cherry Hill. Especially on Sunday mornings, before church, when Mom made "gravy" for the week. Those scents were very pleasurable, and may have been a subconscious trigger for the turn her life would take in the mid-1980s. That was when Shaughnessy, a stressed-out school administrator, read an article about aromatherapy, a form of alternative medicine using fragrant "essential oils" distilled from plants.
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