IN THE NEWS

Oil

NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert P. Hauptfuhrer, 81, a Sun Oil executive whose entrepreneurial family came to the United States from Germany in the 1860s, died Sunday, Aug. 11, at Bryn Mawr Hospital from complications of a brain hemorrhage. His mother's father, Albert Schoenhut, immigrated from Wurttemberg in 1866 at age 17. He started making toy pianos out of a storefront on Frankford Avenue in 1872. The business later became the Schoenhut Toy & Piano Co., employing 400 workers. Mr. Hauptfuhrer's other grandfather, Henry, immigrated from Wollmar to Philadelphia in 1882 and founded Hauptfuhrer Dairies, which eventually became part of National Dairies.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: My husband and I are selling our home, and the buyer is requesting the removal of the oil tank in our basement. We switched to gas a few years ago. Do you have any advice for how we should go about having the tank removed? The oil was siphoned out when we switched to gas, but I don't know if it is 100 percent clean and dry. In other words, I don't know if it would be a big mess if we call a scrap metal guy to come cut it up. Answer: The solution is much easier than if the tank were one of those buried in the yard, because all sorts of environmental regulations kick in, and for good reason, since having fuel oil leaking into the groundwater is very bad. In your case, you should contact the nearest company that deals in removing basement tanks.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Steven Mufson, Washington Post
The oil services company Halliburton agreed Thursday to plead guilty to destroying evidence during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster in 2010, admitting one count of criminal conduct and agreeing to pay the $200,000 maximum statutory fine, according to the Justice Department. In a startling turn in the three-year-old criminal investigation, Halliburton said that on two occasions during the oil spill, it directed employees to destroy or "get rid of" simulations that would have helped clarify how to assign blame for the blowout - and possibly focused more attention on Halliburton's role.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Kartikay Mehrotra and Bibhudatta Pradhan, BLOOMBERG
The source of poison that killed 23 schoolchildren last week in the Indian state of Bihar was the vessel storing cooking oil used to prepare their lunch, an official said, citing a forensic report released Saturday. Monocrotophos, a highly toxic organophosphate insecticide, was found in the oil container, the food, and the utensil in which it was cooked, R. Lakshmanan, who runs the mid-day meals program in the state, said in a telephone interview. The chemical, which the United States stopped using in 1988, according to the Extension Toxicology Network website.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2013 | By Anya Litvak, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
To endear a hotel to the oil and gas crowd, give them a place to eat and sleep at all hours of the day, a place to wash their boots, a warm place to smoke in the winter, and a cold beer once in a while. So goes the formula developed by Tejas Gosai, president of the Washington, Pa.-based Shale Hotel Inc. The company is managing two hotels geared toward oil and gas workers, building two others, and preparing to turn the Monroeville Holiday Inn into an industry destination for workers summoned by the Marcellus Shale boom.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By Julie Carr Smyth and Kevin Begos, Associated Press
In parts of Pennsylvania and Ohio, where horse-drawn buggies clip-clop at the pace of a bygone era, Amish communities are debating a new temptation: The large cash royalties that can come with the boom in oil and gas drilling. In some ways, Amish attitudes toward hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, are as different from the outside world as their clothes and traditions. Instead of worries about air and water pollution, they are focusing on people's souls. "Amish are no different than anybody else.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
By Philipp Meyer Ecco. 592 pp. $27.99 Reviewed by Kevin Grauke Texans are notoriously prickly when it comes to outsiders writing about their homeland, especially when what's being written are Texas-sized novels meant to capture its essence. Take Edna Ferber's Giant (1952) and James Michener's Texas (1985). Both were greeted with howls from the Lone Star State for historical and sociocultural inaccuracies, as well as their hoary stereotypes. Taking up this gauntlet is Philipp Meyer, whose first novel, American Rust, won acclaim from coast to coast for its unflinching portrait of a dying Pennsylvania steel town.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By late morning in New York, benchmark crude for August delivery was up 52 cents to $105.43 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Even with a drop of $1.60 a barrel Thursday, the price of oil is still up about 9 percent this month., ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The price of oil rose back above $105 Friday. Gasoline prices jumped the most since mid-February, unwelcome news for summertime drivers. Drivers are seeing the impact. The average price for a gallon of gas in the U.S. rose 3 cents to $3.55 a gallon, the biggest one-day increase since Feb. 16, according to AAA. Prices rose 10 cents in both Indiana and Michigan. The average price has gained 8 cents since Monday, reversing what had been a steady decline since the middle of June.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | Associated Press
LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec - A train carrying crude oil derailed Saturday in eastern Quebec, sparking several explosions and a blaze that nearly destroyed the center of the town of Lac-Megantic and killed at least one person. An unspecified number of people were reported missing. Witnesses said the eruptions sent residents scrambling through the streets under the intense heat of towering fireballs and a red glow that illuminated the night sky. Quebec Provincial Police Lt. Michel Brunet confirmed that one person had died.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2013 | By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
MAIPÚ, Argentina - Ten minutes in the orchard and already my hands felt raw. How do they do this all day without gloves, I wondered, shuffling my feet for a better foothold in Argentina's sandy clay. It was Thursday, the day we'd expected to be tasting wine at the Zuccardi family's finca (ranch) and winery, in Maipú, Mendoza Province. Instead, we were clawing through a tangle of branches, trying to pick enough olives to feed Zuccardi's state-of-the-art olive oil press. It looked so easy when Torey Novak, Zuccardi's tour guide, gave a demonstration.
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