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Oklahoma City Bombing

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NEWS
November 19, 1997 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An Arkansas gun collector yesterday described how a masked man jammed a shotgun into his neck, bound and blindfolded him with duct tape, then methodically robbed his house of more than $60,000 worth of weapons, jewels and cash in November 1994 - five months before the Oklahoma City bombing. The collector, Roger Moore, took the witness stand yesterday in the federal trial of Terry Nichols, who is accused of helping Timothy McVeigh plan the bombing on April 19, 1995, that killed 168 people.
NEWS
January 6, 1998 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal jury today will resume deliberating whether Terry Nichols deserves to die for his part in the plot to bomb Oklahoma City's federal building in 1995. The blast killed 168 people, 19 of them babies and toddlers in a day-care center. That fact, the prosecution argued in closing remarks yesterday in the penalty phase, should dictate the severest possible punishment. "What in the world did he think that bomb would do to the people in the Murrah building?" demanded prosecutor Beth Wilkinson, who said Nichols made choices that led inexorably to the bombing's devastation.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Investigators of the Oklahoma City bombing now think that the widely sought suspect, John Doe No. 2, was an Army private who wasn't involved in the bombing, which left 168 dead, the Justice Department said yesterday. The Fort Riley, Kan., soldier, who has been questioned by the FBI, apparently just happened to be at a Kansas truck rental company when Timothy McVeigh rented a truck, law enforcement officials said. They said they think the soldier, Todd Bunting, 23, is the man in the sketches wearing a baseball cap, but they still must resolve a number of questions before making a final determination.
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An ammunition dealer with the face of a grandmother and the attitude of a prizefighter took the witness stand yesterday and identified one rifle after another from a stash confiscated from Terry Nichols' house after the Oklahoma City bombing. The government contends that Nichols, who is on trial in federal court here, stole the guns from Arkansas dealer Roger Moore, resold them, and used the money to finance the April 19, 1995, attack on the Oklahoma City federal building that killed 168 people.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | By Andrew Backover, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sitting in her living room last week, Kathleen Hannum chuckled while skimming through a chapter of Pole Hill. The book, published last year, was written by a former Gibbsboro resident hoping to pass on childhood memories of this old mill town. For Hannum, 29, who has lived in her Holly Road home her whole life, the book holds special meaning. But not for the obvious reasons. "This is so funny, though, isn't it?" she said, careful not to wake her 11-month-old son, who slept down the hall.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | By Lori Montgomery, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Oklahoma City bombing has knocked the 1994 assault-weapons ban off the fast track toward repeal, and Congress may not return to the issue until as late as next year. Within days of the April 19 blast - the worst act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history - House leaders indefinitely postponed a scheduled hearing on the ban, saying they had to lay it aside to work on combating terrorism. Then Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas abandoned his vow to put a repeal on President Clinton's desk by summer, saying "it may be next year" before the Senate considered the issue.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | For The Inquirer / BARBARA JOHNSTON
These St. Bernadette School pupils, marching past St. Bernadette Church in Drexel Hill, were among those who participated in a walk-athon Friday to raise money for victims off the Oklahoma City bombing. Members of the community were invited to join.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
A third man wanted in the Oklahoma City bombing has been identified as Steven Colbern, a fugitive from a previous firearms charge. Meanwhile, a federal grand jury yesterday formally indicted Michigan farmer James Nichols on charges of conspiring with his brother, Terry, and Oklahoma City bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh to illegally possess explosives. Colbern is described as 6-foot-1 and 195 pounds, mid-30s with green eyes, which roughly matches the description of "John Doe 2. " Law enforcement sources said last night Colbern was identified through his brown pickup truck.
NEWS
April 2, 2005 | Daily News wire services
FBI blew bomb search Pursuing information that they had missed evidence a decade ago, FBI agents searched the former home of convicted Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols and found blasting caps and other explosive materials apparently related to the 1995 attack, officials said yesterday. FBI officials said the material was found buried in a crawl space of the house in Herington, Kan., which wasn't checked by agents during numerous searches during the investigation of Nichols and Timothy McVeigh.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Eileen Sullivan, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - More than 15 years after a fertilizer bomb was used to blow up a government building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people, the federal government is proposing to regulate the sale and transfer of ammonium nitrate. The proposal comes nearly four years after Congress gave the Homeland Security Department the authority to develop a program to regulate the compound. Ammonium nitrate is one of the most common farm fertilizers in the world, and instructions for turning it into a bomb are available on the Internet.
NEWS
August 28, 2010
DROP woes linked to workforce size Since the very beginning of the DROP program controversy, the city workers' unions and their employees have consistently told us that it costs the city nothing. If they are not getting anything extra, then why the great rush to get their snouts into this particular trough? In the 1950s, Philadelphia had a lot more population and a lot fewer municipal employees. As our mayor goes looking to save money on fire houses and libraries, all around him union vampires suck the life out of our city.
NEWS
May 6, 2010
POWELL PLAYED a controversial role in the MOVE story: He's the man who dropped the bomb on the roof of the MOVE house. The bomb was a mix of Tovex, one of the explosives used in the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995, and C-4, which was used during the Vietnam War. The MOVE Commission concluded that the bomb ignited the fire that killed 11 people and destroyed 61 rowhouses. 1985: Powell was commanding officer of the Philadelphia Police Department's bomb-disposal squad. In an effort to dislodge the bunker MOVE had built atop their house, he balanced on the skid of a helicopter and dropped a bag of explosives on to the roof.
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago this Friday, Philadelphia became "The City That Bombed Itself. " On the evening of May 13, 1985, in the Cobbs Creek section of West Philadelphia, police dropped explosives onto the headquarters of the radical group MOVE. The explosion started a fire that city officials allowed to burn. When the blaze was out, 61 homes were gone and 11 people, five of them children, were dead inside MOVE headquarters. The days that followed were a period of sadness and shame unlike any in the city's history, the start of a civic funk that lasted for nearly a decade.
NEWS
April 2, 2005 | Daily News wire services
FBI blew bomb search Pursuing information that they had missed evidence a decade ago, FBI agents searched the former home of convicted Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols and found blasting caps and other explosive materials apparently related to the 1995 attack, officials said yesterday. FBI officials said the material was found buried in a crawl space of the house in Herington, Kan., which wasn't checked by agents during numerous searches during the investigation of Nichols and Timothy McVeigh.
NEWS
March 26, 2004 | By Andrew Cohen
Terry Nichols, a man no one presumes to be innocent, this week went on trial again for his role in the Oklahoma City bombing - even though most Oklahomans didn't like the idea, and even though the federal courts almost certainly will reject the death sentence his state court judge and jury almost surely will impose. He went on trial again at enormous relative cost to a financially strapped state. Nichols already was serving a federal life sentence as Timothy McVeigh's co-conspirator in the massive bombing that left 168 people dead at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995.
NEWS
February 16, 2003 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF INQUIRER
On June 17, Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua turns 80, the age at which Pope John Paul II asks most of his cardinal-archbishops to step down. Who might succeed the cardinal - and when - rests solely with the Holy Father. But around the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia, and in Roman Catholic circles across the nation, there is lively speculation as to who might be selected to next lead the region's nearly 1.5 million Catholics. Cardinal Bevilacqua, who marked his 15th anniversary as archbishop Tuesday, says it is "premature" to discuss his retirement, and he will not speculate on his successor.
NEWS
September 11, 2002 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally, a place for Stan Maslowski to grieve, close to home. Since his daughter, Diane, was killed in the 1988 Pan Am bombing, Maslowski has traveled to monuments in Washington and in Lockerbie, Scotland, the site of the crash. Where did he grieve at home? "It was called a pillow," said Maslowski, who lives in Haddonfield. So he welcomes a new Victims of Terrorism Memorial to be dedicated today on the banks of the Cooper River. Maslowski helped plan the monument, a cherry tree surrounded by seven stone pillars bearing the names of South Jersey victims of the Sept.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | By LLOYD WILLIAMS
"The basic tool for the manipulation of reality is the manipulation of words. If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use the words. " - Philip K. Dick WILL ROGERS, who was part Native American, once said, "I never met a man I didn't like. " Well, he never met Osama bin Laden. And Rogers also believed that "fanatical religion, driven to a certain point is almost as bad as none at all. " But before you presume where Will would stand on our present crisis, consider his statement that "Politics is the best show in America.
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