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Older Americans Act

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NEWS
February 20, 1995 | BY ANNE B. HAGELE
The 1965 Congress passed the Older Americans Act as part of the Great Society, not as part of the War on Poverty. The nutrition and social services funded through this far-reaching legislation are not welfare programs for the poor. They are supports for America's parents and grandparents, particularly for those who have no families or whose families live at great distances. As the result of the Older Americans Act, a network of resources and services has evolved throughout the country, which helps older people live independently in the community for as long as possible.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. H. James Saxton (R., N.J.), of Burlington County, will be the keynote speaker Tuesday at a community forum focusing on the needs of older residents of Burlington County. Sponsored by the county Office on Aging, the forum, from 10 a.m. to noon in the county Safety Center on Woodlane Road in Westampton Township, will allow residents to discuss programs and services they would like to see started or increased. They also will be able to ask Saxton questions about issues now facing the older population.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
America is turning gray. Better health care and economic security mean most people will live to age 75 or beyond. Many want to remain just where they are - in the communities where they raised their families. A demographic tidal wave is changing the face of Philadelphia's suburbs, according to a four-part series ("Aging in the Suburbs") in last week's Inquirer by staff writers Lini S. Kadaba and Rita Giordano. The shift from populations of mostly young, able-bodied families to increasing households of older adults offers extraordinary public-policy challenges.
NEWS
May 26, 1998 | By Holly Lange
Picture yourself old, alone and homebound. Imagine a 10-minute conversation with a passing neighbor is the only interaction you have with anyone all day. How would you manage if you couldn't navigate out into the world for groceries? If you can picture this, you may have an idea of how 5,900 elderly, homebound Philadelphians feel. And thousands more need help. Meals-on-wheels programs for the aging and disabled are attempting to fulfill a vital need. The need for service programs like this will continue to expand as the elderly population grows.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A nutrition site for senior citizens will open in the Bud Duble Community Center next week after a two-year search for the "perfect place," a Camden County spokeswoman said. The county had been looking for a well-populated area in its southern end for the Camden County Nutrition Project, said Joy Merulla, director of the Camden County Division of Senior Services. "We took a look at the growing population of seniors in the southern portion of Camden County, and we realized that a lot of our seniors are down there," Merulla said.
NEWS
March 24, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Although they've never met, Ralph Marcarelli of Broomall and Joseph Mignogna of Glenolden have something in common besides being senior citizens. Both are full-time caregivers for invalid wives, and both rely heavily on the services of the federal Family Caregiver Support Program to help with their needs while remaining in their Delaware County homes. Marcarelli, 85, a retired salesman, took over many of the household duties, including cleaning, laundry, and grocery shopping, when his wife, Ruth, 82, started using a wheelchair two years ago. As a result of three hip-replacement operations and one knee replacement along with arthritis and chronic leg problems, Ruth needs help with the very things she once took for granted, like cooking and bathing, she said.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dena Jassawalla arrived in Delaware County two months ago from Houston, where, despite her age and infirmities, she had been active in senior organizations. "I now live with my son and his wife in Glen Mills," the 74-year-old widow wrote. "I'm in an unfamiliar area, and I miss the concerts, lunches, trips to the casino and lectures I'm used to attending. Who can help me?" The answer, in this age of baby boomers and senior discounts, is plenty of people, Dena - plenty of kindred souls, and lots of senior activity centers, and a wide range of programs for the 60-and-better crowd.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Judy Baehr, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The word is out among senior citizens around Camden County when it comes to questions about benefits and services available to them: "Call Mary - she'll know. " Mary is Mary Vogel, an outreach worker at the Camden County Office on Aging. Many callers who know her by her vibrant telephone voice and brisk, efficient manner would be surprised to learn that she's 80. Active in behalf of the elderly for the last 20 years, Vogel has served as founder and president of the Cherry Hill Maturity Club, chairman of the township's Senior Citizens Advisory Board and a member of the Church Road Civic Association.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tillie is real proud about finishing a small jigsaw puzzle in only two hours, especially because she noticed that the box said "two to four years. " That's Tillie's opening revelation as she comes bustling, a little breathlessly, into the crowded room at the Oxford Senior Center: a country bumpkin wearing a baggy house dress, shabby sneakers, a faded apron, and plastic flowers in her silly straw hat. Tillie is the persona created by Joyce Hershey, wife of State Rep. Arthur Hershey, as a means of conveying her message of optimism, friendship and tolerance.
NEWS
February 16, 2003 | By Phil Joyce FOR THE INQUIRER
After seven years of writing about seniors, an editor really stumped me with this question: "What is a senior citizen?" The best explanation I can give is the one former Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart gave on another subject - pornography. "I know it when I see it," said Stewart, who declined to define it. I can't say authoritatively when a person enters the august world of senior citizenship. But I know a senior citizen when I see one. If you had to pin me down, I'd say anyone 60 and older.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rodney D. Williams, president of the Philadelphia Corporation for Aging for 39 of its 40 years, is leaving his post this week immensely proud of all the poor and elderly Philadelphians whom he and his agency have helped. But he also carries into retirement, along with his beloved dog, Kosmo, who comes to work with him each day, a deep sense of sadness over the struggles to secure adequate funding from the state. "They're dismantling the program," he said. Which program? "Everything," he clarified.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
America is turning gray. Better health care and economic security mean most people will live to age 75 or beyond. Many want to remain just where they are - in the communities where they raised their families. A demographic tidal wave is changing the face of Philadelphia's suburbs, according to a four-part series ("Aging in the Suburbs") in last week's Inquirer by staff writers Lini S. Kadaba and Rita Giordano. The shift from populations of mostly young, able-bodied families to increasing households of older adults offers extraordinary public-policy challenges.
NEWS
July 26, 2004 | Edited by Kevin Ferris
All this week, the Commentary Page will be asking questions of local delegates to the Democratic National Convention in Boston and running their replies. (We'll be doing the same at the Republican convention.) Today's question: What do you wish that others (i.e., Republicans and Independents) knew about your party that they don't seem to know? We speak to seniors Martin Berger Ardmore District 7 delegate We want Americans to remember who provided the benefits they admire the most, Social Security and Medicare.
NEWS
February 16, 2003 | By Phil Joyce FOR THE INQUIRER
After seven years of writing about seniors, an editor really stumped me with this question: "What is a senior citizen?" The best explanation I can give is the one former Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart gave on another subject - pornography. "I know it when I see it," said Stewart, who declined to define it. I can't say authoritatively when a person enters the august world of senior citizenship. But I know a senior citizen when I see one. If you had to pin me down, I'd say anyone 60 and older.
NEWS
March 24, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Although they've never met, Ralph Marcarelli of Broomall and Joseph Mignogna of Glenolden have something in common besides being senior citizens. Both are full-time caregivers for invalid wives, and both rely heavily on the services of the federal Family Caregiver Support Program to help with their needs while remaining in their Delaware County homes. Marcarelli, 85, a retired salesman, took over many of the household duties, including cleaning, laundry, and grocery shopping, when his wife, Ruth, 82, started using a wheelchair two years ago. As a result of three hip-replacement operations and one knee replacement along with arthritis and chronic leg problems, Ruth needs help with the very things she once took for granted, like cooking and bathing, she said.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dena Jassawalla arrived in Delaware County two months ago from Houston, where, despite her age and infirmities, she had been active in senior organizations. "I now live with my son and his wife in Glen Mills," the 74-year-old widow wrote. "I'm in an unfamiliar area, and I miss the concerts, lunches, trips to the casino and lectures I'm used to attending. Who can help me?" The answer, in this age of baby boomers and senior discounts, is plenty of people, Dena - plenty of kindred souls, and lots of senior activity centers, and a wide range of programs for the 60-and-better crowd.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tillie is real proud about finishing a small jigsaw puzzle in only two hours, especially because she noticed that the box said "two to four years. " That's Tillie's opening revelation as she comes bustling, a little breathlessly, into the crowded room at the Oxford Senior Center: a country bumpkin wearing a baggy house dress, shabby sneakers, a faded apron, and plastic flowers in her silly straw hat. Tillie is the persona created by Joyce Hershey, wife of State Rep. Arthur Hershey, as a means of conveying her message of optimism, friendship and tolerance.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A nutrition site for senior citizens will open in the Bud Duble Community Center next week after a two-year search for the "perfect place," a Camden County spokeswoman said. The county had been looking for a well-populated area in its southern end for the Camden County Nutrition Project, said Joy Merulla, director of the Camden County Division of Senior Services. "We took a look at the growing population of seniors in the southern portion of Camden County, and we realized that a lot of our seniors are down there," Merulla said.
NEWS
May 26, 1998 | By Holly Lange
Picture yourself old, alone and homebound. Imagine a 10-minute conversation with a passing neighbor is the only interaction you have with anyone all day. How would you manage if you couldn't navigate out into the world for groceries? If you can picture this, you may have an idea of how 5,900 elderly, homebound Philadelphians feel. And thousands more need help. Meals-on-wheels programs for the aging and disabled are attempting to fulfill a vital need. The need for service programs like this will continue to expand as the elderly population grows.
NEWS
February 20, 1995 | BY ANNE B. HAGELE
The 1965 Congress passed the Older Americans Act as part of the Great Society, not as part of the War on Poverty. The nutrition and social services funded through this far-reaching legislation are not welfare programs for the poor. They are supports for America's parents and grandparents, particularly for those who have no families or whose families live at great distances. As the result of the Older Americans Act, a network of resources and services has evolved throughout the country, which helps older people live independently in the community for as long as possible.
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