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August 26, 2010
There are three general varieties of olive oil on American grocery-store shelves. Here's a guide. Extra virgin olive oil Made from fully ripened olives that are pressed right after harvest, this oil should have a robust, fruity flavor and rich, greenish-gold color. Use extra virgin olive oil when you want its flavor to shine through - on salads, in vegetable dishes, for bread dipping and to season marinades, sauces and soups. Olive oil All-purpose cooking oil, sometimes described as "pure olive oil," has a mild taste that can be a flavor-enhancer in various dishes.
FOOD
January 3, 1990 | By Libby Goldstein, Special to the Daily News
It used to be so easy. If you needed olive oil, you bought whatever was on the shelf at the supermarket. If you needed a lot, you bought it by the gallon on 9th Street at the Italian Market. Most all of the major brands tasted alike, and most of them didn't have much flavor, anyway. They were good for sauteing, fine as bases for flavoring with herbs and spices, and they smoothed out salad dressings even if they didn't add much flavor of their own. No more. Everywhere you go, there is an absolute profusion of olive oils, each with its own flavor and health claim.
FOOD
September 16, 1987 | By LIBBY GOLDSTEIN, Special to the Daily News
I was really pleased when the nutrition types finally decided that mono- unsaturated fats like olive oil (and avocado oil) were actually good for a person. After garlic, olive oil is one of my very favorite foods. I like the kinds that actually taste of olives - especially on salads and most especially with basil, tomato, mozzarella cheese and a grind or two of black pepper from my pepper mill. However, I had company for dinner the other night. The first course was to be a slab of really ripe tomato covered with a thick slice of mozzarella topped with olive oil and basil leaves.
FOOD
May 30, 1990 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Even though olive oil has gained new status with health watchers, the current wisdom still points to keeping down your intake of all forms of fat. How to savor the flavor of fragrant olive oil and enjoy its heart-smart benefits - without a lot of calories? Pair olive oil with ultra low-fat main course choices, fish, for example. Cholesterol-wise calorie watchers will appreciate these recipes; they combine small amounts of olive oil with the heartiest heart-smart main course, fish.
FOOD
August 23, 1992 | By Laura Daily, FOR THE INQUIRER
An old Spanish proverb says "Let the salad maker be a spendthrift for oil, a miser for vinegar, a statesman for salt and a madman for mixing. " Though many of today's consumers have been swayed to the benefits of cooking with olive oil, few still realize that there is an entire library of olive oils from which to choose. While a virgin olive oil might be appropriate for sauteing, Helen Studley, cookbook author and owner of La Colombe d'Or restaurant in New York, points out that "because extra-virgin olive oil has its own distinctive smoky flavor, it's best in salad dressings or as part of a sauce.
FOOD
January 30, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
As Vetri chef Alicia Walter prepared for a recent seven-week trip to study olive oil production in the Mediterranean, she was warned that it wouldn't be pretty. The industry had a rough year, blamed on too much rain in some areas and not enough in others. An olive-eating fruit fly had ravaged crops in Italy and left a dent in Greek olive orchards, as well. Still, she didn't realize how bleak the situation was until she walked into the groves and talked with the devastated families who relied on olive oil for their livelihood.
FOOD
March 14, 1993 | By Faith Willinger, FOR THE INQUIRER
In Italy, scorpacciata (skor-pah-CHA-tah), or just simply scorp, is a focused binge that concentrates on specific foods that are frequently seasonal and/or regional. Spring strawberries, cherries or asparagus, tomato or truffle season, a special dessert, a midnight spaghetti snack or a big holiday dinner may all be opportunities for a serious scorp. One of the most serious scorps takes place each winter in Tuscany, when freshly pressed, almost phosphorescent green, aggressively peppery olive oil is abundantly poured over practically everything at the table.
FOOD
January 26, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
Maybe it's time to look beyond claims of virginity in the oil aisle. Because you see, our 20-year love affair with olive oil has had fallout. We've forgotten that there's a whole world of oils that don't come from the olive tree. And they can do a heck of a lot more than just saute and make a fine dressing. OK, maybe we didn't forget. Maybe we didn't know about them at all. It's not as though before the EVOO revolution we were all swilling avocado and grape-seed oils. But olive oil has done a fine job of elbowing out other up-and-comers.
NEWS
September 22, 2004 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this age of diet daze, it may afford some relief to hear that the simple trinity of olive oil, wheat and wine enjoyed for centuries in the Mediterranean is still the ticket to good health and long life. Two studies published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggest that the Mediterranean diet, along with several lifestyle changes, can substantially reduce the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes and add years of life. In one study, elderly people who followed this regimen had a death rate more than 50 percent lower than those who did not. "This is a perfect example of how lifestyle changes can benefit you in the long term, and it's about mortality, which is kind of important," said Angie Makris, an obesity researcher at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine whose Greek parents raised her on Mediterranean foods.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2010 | By P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, Los Angeles Times
THE FEDERAL government has become serious about virginity - at least when it comes to olive oil. Propelled by complaints about slippery food purveyors selling low-end product as high-end goods, or olive oils being doctored with cheaper canola, safflower or peanut oils, the Department of Agriculture this fall will roll out new standards to help ensure that consumers buying "100 percent extra virgin" olive oil get what they pay for. Demand for...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
February 13, 2015 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Necessity, they say, is the mother of invention. It certainly can be the case in the kitchen, as my wife and I discovered a few years ago, when we were vacationing, as usual, in a cabin outside Tunkhannock in Wyoming County near the Poconos. This is a cabin with all the amenities, including a state-of-the-art grill on the deck overlooking a creek winding its way down Vosburg Neck to the Susquehanna River. Grilling is not my culinary long suit, though I can manage to turn out a half-decent steak.
FOOD
January 30, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
As Vetri chef Alicia Walter prepared for a recent seven-week trip to study olive oil production in the Mediterranean, she was warned that it wouldn't be pretty. The industry had a rough year, blamed on too much rain in some areas and not enough in others. An olive-eating fruit fly had ravaged crops in Italy and left a dent in Greek olive orchards, as well. Still, she didn't realize how bleak the situation was until she walked into the groves and talked with the devastated families who relied on olive oil for their livelihood.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
LONG HOTS are to peppers what the Liberty Bell is to American history: iconic, necessary and impossible to live without. Long hots deliver just the right amount of heat along with full-on pepper flavor that turns an average sandwich into an eye-popping culinary bomb. A common accessory in homemade Italian comfort cooking, long hots are generally fried, or roasted with olive oil, garlic and salt and served whole, skin and seeds intact. Because they vary so much in spiciness, the sly little devils play peek-a-boo with the Scoville scale, the accepted way to chart the heat of chili peppers.
REAL_ESTATE
March 3, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Now that we're at least on the same calendar page as spring, it's time to tackle a reader's question about removing pine sap from her car. Thanks to all for their suggestions. Trish Davidson says that she makes Christmas wreaths and rubs her hands with olive oil to remove the sap. Lindsey Nair of Roanoke, Va., says any kind of vegetable oil, as well as peanut butter, would work. Let the oil soak into the sap spots overnight to loosen them. Susan Grantham of Tallahassee, Fla., uses rubbing alcohol, putting some on a soft cloth and rubbing gently.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
NINE-month-old Adler Ferrell was in the kitchen - a safe distance from the action, though - and watching intently as his mom, Jerrie Leone Ferrell, cooked dinner. Having a family audience is nothing new to Ferrell, who grew up in a large Italian family - two older brothers and a younger sister - in Jamison, Bucks County. Dinnertime brought everyone together, she recalled. "I remember a lot of pasta going on," Ferrell said. "There would also be a veal or chicken dish, and we always ended with fruit.
FOOD
November 22, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
In modern America, Hanukkah generally overlaps with the Christmas season of gifts and parties. But this year, when the first day of Hanukkah falls on Thanksgiving Day, it bears reflecting on the commonalities of those two holidays: Indeed, both are based on a quest for freedom and both include food traditions to recall days long ago. The food traditions of Hanukkah center on oil, commemorating the story of one day's supply of oil burning for...
FOOD
October 18, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
No one was more excited about cooking classes than Mark Ramirez, 10, one of the fifth graders at Bayard Taylor Elementary School in North Philadelphia, where we started lessons last week. "I cook with my dad a lot," he said. "He's taught me all the basics. " His was the first hand to shoot up at every question. Who wants to read the recipe? Who wants to wash the vegetables. Who wants to chop the tomatoes? Mark was all in. And he did watch closely as I demonstrated the most important first lesson: how to hold the knife, how to turn under the fingertips of your other hand, how to work slowly and carefully, so as not to cut a finger.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2013 | By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
MAIPÚ, Argentina - Ten minutes in the orchard and already my hands felt raw. How do they do this all day without gloves, I wondered, shuffling my feet for a better foothold in Argentina's sandy clay. It was Thursday, the day we'd expected to be tasting wine at the Zuccardi family's finca (ranch) and winery, in Maipú, Mendoza Province. Instead, we were clawing through a tangle of branches, trying to pick enough olives to feed Zuccardi's state-of-the-art olive oil press. It looked so easy when Torey Novak, Zuccardi's tour guide, gave a demonstration.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is well known that the French did not invent wine - no more than the Colombians invented coffee or the Italians discovered tomatoes - but they elevated it to a high art. Now, after analyzing residue from a hunk of ancient limestone, a University of Pennsylvania scientist said Monday that he had found the earliest chemical evidence of le vin français . The 2,400-year-old stone, apparently a pressing platform with a spout fashioned on...
NEWS
May 17, 2013
Editor's note: Here's a recipe from the new cookbook Vedge: 100 Plates Large and Small That Redefine Vegetable Cooking , with Rich Landau's commentary.Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold in July 2013. BRUSSELS SPROUTS were one of my personal challenges when we opened Vedge; I was never very fond of them. But as we prepared to open a vegetable restaurant, I vowed to prepare any vegetable, even ones I didn't like very much, in ways everyone could enjoy.
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