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August 26, 2010
There are three general varieties of olive oil on American grocery-store shelves. Here's a guide. Extra virgin olive oil Made from fully ripened olives that are pressed right after harvest, this oil should have a robust, fruity flavor and rich, greenish-gold color. Use extra virgin olive oil when you want its flavor to shine through - on salads, in vegetable dishes, for bread dipping and to season marinades, sauces and soups. Olive oil All-purpose cooking oil, sometimes described as "pure olive oil," has a mild taste that can be a flavor-enhancer in various dishes.
FOOD
January 3, 1990 | By Libby Goldstein, Special to the Daily News
It used to be so easy. If you needed olive oil, you bought whatever was on the shelf at the supermarket. If you needed a lot, you bought it by the gallon on 9th Street at the Italian Market. Most all of the major brands tasted alike, and most of them didn't have much flavor, anyway. They were good for sauteing, fine as bases for flavoring with herbs and spices, and they smoothed out salad dressings even if they didn't add much flavor of their own. No more. Everywhere you go, there is an absolute profusion of olive oils, each with its own flavor and health claim.
FOOD
September 16, 1987 | By LIBBY GOLDSTEIN, Special to the Daily News
I was really pleased when the nutrition types finally decided that mono- unsaturated fats like olive oil (and avocado oil) were actually good for a person. After garlic, olive oil is one of my very favorite foods. I like the kinds that actually taste of olives - especially on salads and most especially with basil, tomato, mozzarella cheese and a grind or two of black pepper from my pepper mill. However, I had company for dinner the other night. The first course was to be a slab of really ripe tomato covered with a thick slice of mozzarella topped with olive oil and basil leaves.
FOOD
May 30, 1990 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Even though olive oil has gained new status with health watchers, the current wisdom still points to keeping down your intake of all forms of fat. How to savor the flavor of fragrant olive oil and enjoy its heart-smart benefits - without a lot of calories? Pair olive oil with ultra low-fat main course choices, fish, for example. Cholesterol-wise calorie watchers will appreciate these recipes; they combine small amounts of olive oil with the heartiest heart-smart main course, fish.
FOOD
August 23, 1992 | By Laura Daily, FOR THE INQUIRER
An old Spanish proverb says "Let the salad maker be a spendthrift for oil, a miser for vinegar, a statesman for salt and a madman for mixing. " Though many of today's consumers have been swayed to the benefits of cooking with olive oil, few still realize that there is an entire library of olive oils from which to choose. While a virgin olive oil might be appropriate for sauteing, Helen Studley, cookbook author and owner of La Colombe d'Or restaurant in New York, points out that "because extra-virgin olive oil has its own distinctive smoky flavor, it's best in salad dressings or as part of a sauce.
FOOD
January 30, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
As Vetri chef Alicia Walter prepared for a recent seven-week trip to study olive oil production in the Mediterranean, she was warned that it wouldn't be pretty. The industry had a rough year, blamed on too much rain in some areas and not enough in others. An olive-eating fruit fly had ravaged crops in Italy and left a dent in Greek olive orchards, as well. Still, she didn't realize how bleak the situation was until she walked into the groves and talked with the devastated families who relied on olive oil for their livelihood.
FOOD
March 14, 1993 | By Faith Willinger, FOR THE INQUIRER
In Italy, scorpacciata (skor-pah-CHA-tah), or just simply scorp, is a focused binge that concentrates on specific foods that are frequently seasonal and/or regional. Spring strawberries, cherries or asparagus, tomato or truffle season, a special dessert, a midnight spaghetti snack or a big holiday dinner may all be opportunities for a serious scorp. One of the most serious scorps takes place each winter in Tuscany, when freshly pressed, almost phosphorescent green, aggressively peppery olive oil is abundantly poured over practically everything at the table.
FOOD
January 26, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
Maybe it's time to look beyond claims of virginity in the oil aisle. Because you see, our 20-year love affair with olive oil has had fallout. We've forgotten that there's a whole world of oils that don't come from the olive tree. And they can do a heck of a lot more than just saute and make a fine dressing. OK, maybe we didn't forget. Maybe we didn't know about them at all. It's not as though before the EVOO revolution we were all swilling avocado and grape-seed oils. But olive oil has done a fine job of elbowing out other up-and-comers.
NEWS
September 22, 2004 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this age of diet daze, it may afford some relief to hear that the simple trinity of olive oil, wheat and wine enjoyed for centuries in the Mediterranean is still the ticket to good health and long life. Two studies published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggest that the Mediterranean diet, along with several lifestyle changes, can substantially reduce the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes and add years of life. In one study, elderly people who followed this regimen had a death rate more than 50 percent lower than those who did not. "This is a perfect example of how lifestyle changes can benefit you in the long term, and it's about mortality, which is kind of important," said Angie Makris, an obesity researcher at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine whose Greek parents raised her on Mediterranean foods.
FOOD
January 14, 1990 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Those letters BYOB at the bottom of an invitation mean Bring Your Own Bottle. Usually. But in the case of one local restaurant, they might have meant Bring Your Own Butter. For a few months during the summer and fall, it was virtually impossible to get butter for your bread at Apropos, a Center City restaurant. Maybe if you stood on your head and whistled, or threatened a server with a butter knife, you'd get some. But for the most part, when it came to withholding butter from its patrons, the restaurant stood pat. What Apropos did serve was olive oil. Good, rich-tasting, 100 percent extra-virgin olive oil. Dip the hard-crusted bread in the oil, sprinkle it with some pepper and herbs, and enjoy.
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FOOD
August 12, 2016
Hazelnuts have been favored for centuries because they are so versatile and complement so many flavors. So it's no surprise they are the star of this main course, included in a cookbook of Mediterranean recipes for folks who need to follow a low-glucose regimen. But be assured: This pasta is all about being delicious. Hazelnut Pasta Makes 2 or 3 servings   3 ounces skinned hazelnuts 2 to 3 cloves garlic 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes Leaves from 4 stems flat-leaf parsley Kosher or fine sea salt 7 ounces whole-wheat penne 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 ounces Parmigiano cheese, shaved 2 tablespoons finely grated Pecorino Romano cheese 1. Bring a pot of water to a boil.
FOOD
August 11, 2016
Makes 6-8 servings 1/4 cup diced red onion 2 garlic cloves, minced 1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley, chopped, plus more for garnish 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 tablespoons olive oil 42 grape leaves 12 ounces ground beef 12 ounces ground pork 1/4 cup panko bread crumbs 2 eggs, beaten 1/4 cup half and half Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons crushed walnuts, for garnish ...
FOOD
August 11, 2016
Makes 2 servings 2 black mission figs, halved Olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 2 pieces toasted Dako rusks or toasted baguette slices (see note) 2 tablespoons goat cheese, brought to room temperature and whipped 2 teaspoons honey, preferably Greek 1 teaspoon microgreens 1. Brush figs with olive oil, season with salt and pepper, then grill until marked and softened. 2. Spread goat cheese on rusks or toasts. Place figs on top of goat cheese.
FOOD
July 29, 2016
Few restaurants are closer to the action of the Democratic National Convention this week than Lo Spiedo, the Vetri family's casual outpost just inside the Navy Yard's gates. First-timers may be surprised to find (given Vetri's pedigree) that there are very few obvious Italian influences on the menu. But as I tasted at a recent meal, Lo Spiedo has continued to refine its unusual amalgam of Southern flavors - bolstered by a wood-fired smoker and grill - fused with more subtle Italian influences.
FOOD
June 30, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1/4 fennel bulb, cut into quarters 1/2 red onion, quartered 1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped 2 whole garlic cloves, peeled 1 bay leaf 1 carrot, quartered 1/2 tablespoon black peppercorns Pinch of crushed red pepper 1 pound sushi-grade yellowfin tuna loin, cut into 2½- to 3-inch slices Generous amount of salt Mild olive oil (not extra virgin; ligurian is preferred) 1. Fill a large, wide braiser with at least 6-inch sides 2/3 full with water, and set over medium high heat.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia stockbroker pleaded guilty Wednesday to securities fraud and related charges for taking about $3 million from investors for a nonexistent import business and other ventures. William Bucci, 59, told people he was going to import high-end olive oil and wine from Italy, and promised other investment ventures. He also induced people to loan him money for a Jersey Shore house. But, according to prosecutors, he used the money mostly for his own expenses. Bucci, who lives in the city but worked in the suburbs, paid back some early investors in part with money he received from later lenders.
FOOD
May 20, 2016
Makes about 3 dozen meatballs 1/4 cup olive oil 2 eggs 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 pound lean ground beef 1/4 cup Italian bread crumbs 1/2 cup fresh Parmesan or Pecorino Romano, grated 1. Preheat the olive oil in a large frying pan. 2. Beat the eggs in a glass mixing bowl. Add the beef, salt, bread crumbs, and cheese and mix together with your hands. Roll each meatball into tiny balls, as small as possible, the size of a chick pea. 3. When the oil is hot, add the meatballs in small amounts and fry until brown on all sides.
FOOD
April 29, 2016
Makes 6 servings 12 boneless, skinless chicken thighs 6 tablespoons olive oil, plus one more 3 teaspoons curry powder 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets 1 cup chopped dried apricots 1 cup pitted green olives, halved 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1. Preheat the oven to...
FOOD
April 8, 2016
Makes 2 servings as an appetizer 6 very thin slices of excellent-quality country ham (3 slices per person) 4 1/2-inch slices of ripe melon (2 slices per person), whichever variety is of the best quality at the time Handful of mint leaves Very good-quality extra virgin olive oil Freshly ground pepper 1. Preheat your grill for 10 minutes at the highest temperature. 2. Coat the melon slices with a small amount of the olive oil and grill briefly on both sides.
FOOD
April 1, 2016
Makes 4 servings 3/4 cup white wine (use something Italian) 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil (infused with fresh thyme is optional) 4 eggs 4 teaspoons garum 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a roasting pan with a dish towel. Fill the roasting pan halfway with very hot water (just shy of boiling). The towel inside the pan will prevent four ramekins from sliding around. Place one ramekin in the pan to make sure the water comes up to an inch below the top of the ramekin.
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