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Olympic Stadium

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February 1, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Olympic Stadium, the 85,000-seat centerpiece of the 1996 Summer Games, needs to have parts of its steel skeleton reinforced, an engineering firm said yesterday. A spokeswoman for the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games would not comment on whether the stadium would have been safe for spectators, but the contractor and engineering firm said it would have been. "It's absolutely safe, always was," said Antranij Ouzoonian, of Weidlinger Associates, a New York-based engineering firm that reviewed construction of the $230 million stadium.
SPORTS
January 19, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
A part of Olympic Stadium's problem-plagued roof caved in yesterday in Montreal as some 200 workers were setting up for an auto show. An avalanche of snow tumbled down and five people were injured. "If I had been at my booth, I would be dead. " said 28-year-old Todd Joel, who was working inside at the stadium at the time. "It was bloody scary. " Joel, who is from Toronto and works for a company that sets up display booths for Subaru, said "the roof has been raining on us" for days.
SPORTS
September 26, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Kevin Brown will return to the New York Yankees' rotation today to start the series finale against the Boston Red Sox. Brown has been out since breaking his non-pitching hand when he punched a clubhouse wall in frustration on Sept. 3. The righthander threw in the bullpen Friday, wearing a glove but letting someone else catch the return throws. Brown will pitch wearing a glove with extra padding. He practiced with it yesterday, taking grounders during pregame infield practice.
SPORTS
August 26, 2004 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Using a series of damaged poles, American Derek Miles was one of 16 pole vaulters to clear the required height of 18 feet, 8 1/4 inches yesterday in the preliminary round. Miles got the qualifying score on his last attempt. Miles will be joined in tomorrow's final by Tim Mack of Knoxville, Tenn., and Toby Stevenson of Chula Vista, Calif. "I was pretty relieved to get through, because our goal was to make it to the finals," Miles said. "It was a little shaky getting things figured out. But I think now that we made it to the finals, we're a little relaxed.
SPORTS
June 7, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Paris remains the city to beat in the race for the 2012 Olympics, while New York's chances took a hit when a powerful state board rejected funding for a proposed stadium. With a month to go before the vote, the French capital solidified its front-runner status yesterday, receiving a glowing review in an International Olympic Committee report evaluating the five cities bidding to host those games. London and Madrid also earned high praise in the 123-page report. But reviews for New York were mixed, with the IOC citing a number of concerns, including uncertainty over a proposed Olympic stadium.
SPORTS
October 19, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Beijing organizers are designing a high-tech Olympic torch capable of withstanding gale-force wind, torrential rain and even the oxygen-thin air atop Mount Everest. To eliminate chances of the flame going out during next's summers Olympics, authorities have set up a torch-design lab under the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp, the Xinhua News Agency reported yesterday. "The flame . . . should be bright and very pleasant to the eyes," technician Xue Li said. The Olympic flame was introduced to the modern Olympics in 1928.
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | BY VERNON ANASTASIO
With Philadelphia trying to convince the Democrats and Republicans that the city in which America was born is the best place to host the national conventions that chart a course for a new millennium, we could be approaching the dawn of a new day in a town that, for too long, fell short in marketing itself. With that in mind, may I suggest that we keep one eye on yet another prize: the Summer Olympics. If the anticipated hotel rooms are built and the city's infrastructure can be maintained, there is no reason we could not host the Summer Games in 2012.
SPORTS
September 26, 2000 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cathy Freeman has delivered two amazing performances at Olympic Stadium during these Games, with one major difference. During the first one, the opening ceremonies, the part the Australian runner would play was unknown. Freeman's role as lighter of the Olympic torch was a surprise sprung on the world. There were no such surprises last night. Freeman was supposed to win the 400-meter gold medal, and that's exactly what she did. Wearing a full body suit, complete with hood, she ran solidly and pulled away from the field in the last 30 meters to win a race that had grown bigger than its distance, bigger even than the massive stadium built to contain it. "This is the night," said Freeman, the first Aborigine to win an individual Olympic gold medal.
SPORTS
July 7, 2005 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harvey Abrams has seen the bid proposal that Philadelphia submitted to the International Olympic Committee when civic leaders such as John B. Kelly sought to bring the 1948 Summer Games here. "It was a thin little thing," Abrams, an Olympic historian based in State College, said yesterday. "There were maybe 20 pages, typewritten, with a few photos of prospective venues pasted in. " Today, with talk of trying to land the 2024 or 2028 Games beginning to flicker in the city like a nascent flame, such a proposal would cost an estimated $10 million and require a small army of professionals to assemble.
SPORTS
August 22, 2004 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She lunged forward, as far as she could, trying to squeeze into the lead in the race for the gold. Lauryn Williams needed one little push, one little sliver of space, to cap a remarkable rise to the top. But a lanky woman from Belarus, a no-name before this Olympics, was a touch faster, a touch longer, and a touch better yesterday. Yuliya Nesterenko improbably captured the gold medal in the women's 100-meter dash with a time of 10.93 seconds, ending the United States' streak of five straight Olympic gold medals in the women's 100. The 20-year-old Williams ran a personal best of 10.96 to win the silver, barely edging Jamaica's Veronica Campbell, who finished in 10.97.
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SPORTS
July 27, 2012
I ADMIT that I envied Inquirer columnist Phil Sheridan on Thursday when I saw the dateline on his story: LONDON. I wish I was there. I love the Olympics. I have since I was 10 years old and watched the 1976 Montreal games. The image of Bruce Jenner waving that little American flag that some fan handed him after he won the decathlon is one of those embedded sports images in my mind. I remember the unrelenting pride to be an American in 1980 when our college kids beat the "big, bad" Soviet ice hockey machine in the "Miracle on Ice" at the Lake Placid Winter games.
SPORTS
October 19, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Beijing organizers are designing a high-tech Olympic torch capable of withstanding gale-force wind, torrential rain and even the oxygen-thin air atop Mount Everest. To eliminate chances of the flame going out during next's summers Olympics, authorities have set up a torch-design lab under the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp, the Xinhua News Agency reported yesterday. "The flame . . . should be bright and very pleasant to the eyes," technician Xue Li said. The Olympic flame was introduced to the modern Olympics in 1928.
SPORTS
July 7, 2005 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harvey Abrams has seen the bid proposal that Philadelphia submitted to the International Olympic Committee when civic leaders such as John B. Kelly sought to bring the 1948 Summer Games here. "It was a thin little thing," Abrams, an Olympic historian based in State College, said yesterday. "There were maybe 20 pages, typewritten, with a few photos of prospective venues pasted in. " Today, with talk of trying to land the 2024 or 2028 Games beginning to flicker in the city like a nascent flame, such a proposal would cost an estimated $10 million and require a small army of professionals to assemble.
SPORTS
June 7, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Paris remains the city to beat in the race for the 2012 Olympics, while New York's chances took a hit when a powerful state board rejected funding for a proposed stadium. With a month to go before the vote, the French capital solidified its front-runner status yesterday, receiving a glowing review in an International Olympic Committee report evaluating the five cities bidding to host those games. London and Madrid also earned high praise in the 123-page report. But reviews for New York were mixed, with the IOC citing a number of concerns, including uncertainty over a proposed Olympic stadium.
SPORTS
September 26, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Kevin Brown will return to the New York Yankees' rotation today to start the series finale against the Boston Red Sox. Brown has been out since breaking his non-pitching hand when he punched a clubhouse wall in frustration on Sept. 3. The righthander threw in the bullpen Friday, wearing a glove but letting someone else catch the return throws. Brown will pitch wearing a glove with extra padding. He practiced with it yesterday, taking grounders during pregame infield practice.
SPORTS
August 30, 2004 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Olympic oracles had long prophesied doom for the Summer Games' Greek homecoming. Unfinished venues. Lax security. Gridlocked traffic. Last night, in the expensively restored stadium that was a focus of the gloomy forecasts, the XXVIII Olympiad officially concluded, punctuating two weeks of athletic competition and several years of doubts with spirited and often-soulful ceremonies. "You have won," said Jacques Rogge, president of the International Olympic Committee. "You have won by brilliantly meeting the tough challenge of holding the Games.
SPORTS
August 26, 2004 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Using a series of damaged poles, American Derek Miles was one of 16 pole vaulters to clear the required height of 18 feet, 8 1/4 inches yesterday in the preliminary round. Miles got the qualifying score on his last attempt. Miles will be joined in tomorrow's final by Tim Mack of Knoxville, Tenn., and Toby Stevenson of Chula Vista, Calif. "I was pretty relieved to get through, because our goal was to make it to the finals," Miles said. "It was a little shaky getting things figured out. But I think now that we made it to the finals, we're a little relaxed.
SPORTS
August 22, 2004 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She lunged forward, as far as she could, trying to squeeze into the lead in the race for the gold. Lauryn Williams needed one little push, one little sliver of space, to cap a remarkable rise to the top. But a lanky woman from Belarus, a no-name before this Olympics, was a touch faster, a touch longer, and a touch better yesterday. Yuliya Nesterenko improbably captured the gold medal in the women's 100-meter dash with a time of 10.93 seconds, ending the United States' streak of five straight Olympic gold medals in the women's 100. The 20-year-old Williams ran a personal best of 10.96 to win the silver, barely edging Jamaica's Veronica Campbell, who finished in 10.97.
SPORTS
August 11, 2004 | By Josh Egerman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sultan Tucker is preparing to represent Liberia in the Olympics, which start Friday. But not in the way Maurice Greene will represent the United States. Or the way Ian Thorpe will represent Australia. Or gymnast Svetlana Khorkina will represent Russia. Tucker will have the Olympic hopes of a nation, limited as they may be, on his shoulders - and his shoulders alone. Tucker, entered in the 110-meter high hurdles, will be the only athlete in Athens representing Liberia, the war-ravaged West African nation of 3.3 million people.
SPORTS
September 26, 2000 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cathy Freeman has delivered two amazing performances at Olympic Stadium during these Games, with one major difference. During the first one, the opening ceremonies, the part the Australian runner would play was unknown. Freeman's role as lighter of the Olympic torch was a surprise sprung on the world. There were no such surprises last night. Freeman was supposed to win the 400-meter gold medal, and that's exactly what she did. Wearing a full body suit, complete with hood, she ran solidly and pulled away from the field in the last 30 meters to win a race that had grown bigger than its distance, bigger even than the massive stadium built to contain it. "This is the night," said Freeman, the first Aborigine to win an individual Olympic gold medal.
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