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NEWS
July 12, 2009 | By Peter Parisi FOR THE INQUIRER
After 63 years, I decided to return. A year ago June, my son and I traveled to Paris and Normandy, including stops at Omaha Beach, Rouen, Caen, and Le Havre, where I served in 1944 and 1945. I was with the Navy Ship Salvage Unit Foxy 29. I landed on Omaha Beach at the end of June 1944 on the LST-291 with a cargo of tanks for the Army. Our mission was to clear the heavily mined ports of Cherbourg and Le Havre of ships and cranes that the Germans had sunk to impede our supply ships.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Frank L. Davis watched the movie Saving Private Ryan, he felt the pain of 54 years being peeled from his life. Suddenly he was 21 again, a sergeant in the 101st Airborne dodging bullets near Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. The first time around, he had been too busy fighting to absorb the horrors of battle or to let terror grip him. The reliving was, in its way, worse. Virtually from the film's start, the bloody panorama of the Normandy invasion produced "one hell of a tightening in my chest, and I couldn't breathe and I shed a lot of tears," said a shaken Davis, of Stanton, Del. "It felt like I was right there again.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fifty years ago today, at 4:15 a.m., a command was given that would change the lives of many thousands of men, including hundreds from this area. "OK, we'll go!" With those words, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force, launched the greatest amphibious operation the world had ever seen. A vast armada of ships carried the assault troops across the English Channel to the beaches of Normandy. Aboard these ships were three Montgomery County men who now have journeyed back to France, to take part in the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of D-Day - June 6, 1944.
SPORTS
July 3, 1994 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fifty years ago, Sid Saloman scaled the cliffs of Omaha Beach on D-Day. Last month, at age 81, he did it again during anniversary celebrations. Yesterday, he rowed 1,000 meters as a member of a composite crew from several clubs of Boathouse Row in the master eight-oared race of the Independence Day Regatta. His crew finished fifth in 4 minutes, 4.42 seconds. Potomac Boat Club was the winner in 3:13.92. The Independence Day Regatta winds up on the Schuylkill today.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | BY MICHAEL D. BYRNE
After planning since the end of World War II, I finally made the trip to visit my brother's grave in Normandy. Jack Byrne, a foot soldier with the U.S. 1st Army's 30th Infantry Division, was killed on July 30, 1944, five days after the breakthrough at St. Lo. Before the war, Jack was a star player for Girard Estates, an outstanding semi-pro baseball team in Philadelphia. In the Army, he played third base for the 26th Division team, which won the Southern Army championship. The night before the trip to St. Laurent Cemetery at Omaha Beach, I had dinner with a friend in a little cafe in Paris.
TRAVEL
November 11, 2013 | By Robin B. Smith, For The Inquirer
NORMANDY, France - At dawn on June 6, 1944, Allied forces landed on the northern coast of France, and June will mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the World War II military operation against the German march to dominate Europe, which began with American, British, and Canadian sacrifices of a magnitude unimaginable to all but survivors of infantry and invasion warfare. A visit to the Normandy beaches, invasion sites, and cemeteries is an opportunity to appreciate today's freedom by honoring not only the soldiers who died but also the survivors - and to attempt to grasp the horror of war by seeing the battlefields and mind-numbing rows of headstones.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward T. Haney, 89, of Doylestown, a decorated World War II veteran, died Tuesday, July 22, of a heart ailment at Fairview Care Center. Born in Abington and raised in Elkins Park, Mr. Haney worked for 32 years as a lubrication engineer at Fiske Bros. Refining Co. in Newark, N.J. His proudest moments, however, came while he served in the Army during World War II, his family said. He was a rifleman assigned to the 29th Infantry Division, one of the first to land on Omaha Beach during D-Day.
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Edward Colimore, For The Inquirer
A few blocks from his Margate, N.J., home, the beach is busy with vacationers baking in the sun, playing in the waves. But when Bernard Friedenberg closes his eyes at night, he sees another sandy shore - a nightmarish place 3,000 miles away that won't let him go, not even after 72 years. Friedenberg tosses and turns in his sleep, he repeats military jargon, and tries to jump from his bed, as if again exiting the landing craft that brought him to Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. The Army medic's lifesaving "work began" the moment he crawled out of the surf - and onto the killing ground that was Normandy, France.
NEWS
July 10, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joseph Potamkin, 87, of Marlton, a machine gunner who landed on Omaha Beach at dawn on D-Day and was captured by the Germans a day later, died Thursday at West Jersey Hospital Marlton. Mr. Potamkin, a native of Philadelphia, stormed Omaha Beach with the 29th Infantry Division about 6 a.m. June 6, 1944. Although more than 90 percent of the unit became casualties, Mr. Potamkin was not injured in the landing and the battle for control of the beach and the area above it, said his son-in-law, Herbert Rennie.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virginia L. Van Dyke Roscoe, 90, of Newtown Square, an Army nurse in World War II, died of heart failure Thursday, Sept. 29, at St. Mary's Medical Center in Langhorne. A native of Grand Rapids, Mich., Mrs. Roscoe graduated from Blodgett Hospital School of Nursing in June 1941. She wanted to join the Army Nurse Corps, but had to wait  to enlist until her 21st birthday in January, 1942,  a son, John, said.  Serving with the 29th Army Field Hospital, Mrs. Roscoe was one of 18 nurses to land on Omaha Beach days after the Normandy invasion.
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NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Edward Colimore, For The Inquirer
A few blocks from his Margate, N.J., home, the beach is busy with vacationers baking in the sun, playing in the waves. But when Bernard Friedenberg closes his eyes at night, he sees another sandy shore - a nightmarish place 3,000 miles away that won't let him go, not even after 72 years. Friedenberg tosses and turns in his sleep, he repeats military jargon, and tries to jump from his bed, as if again exiting the landing craft that brought him to Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. The Army medic's lifesaving "work began" the moment he crawled out of the surf - and onto the killing ground that was Normandy, France.
NEWS
October 17, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christopher C. Rutter Sr. was in the second wave of troops that landed on Omaha Beach under heavy Nazi gunfire June 6, 1944. As soldiers died around him that D-Day morning, daughter Dorothy Shelmet said, "he had promised himself that if he survived that day on the beach, he would come back one day and walk on the beach instead of crawling on it. " In 2004, Mr. Rutter returned with his family to Normandy and walked its beaches to celebrate the...
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THEODORE EISENBERG was dedicated to making sure everybody got a fair shake in life. As a deputy director of the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations, he was charged with seeing to it that city laws governing fair housing, civil rights, job and sex discrimination and affirmative action were enforced. His team dealt with complaints both major and minor, like the woman who complained of sex discrimination because she was given one roll in a restaurant and her husband, being a male, got two. "He was devoted to defending the rights of individuals, in keeping with his persona," said his daughter, Leslie Eisenberg Marion.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward T. Haney, 89, of Doylestown, a decorated World War II veteran, died Tuesday, July 22, of a heart ailment at Fairview Care Center. Born in Abington and raised in Elkins Park, Mr. Haney worked for 32 years as a lubrication engineer at Fiske Bros. Refining Co. in Newark, N.J. His proudest moments, however, came while he served in the Army during World War II, his family said. He was a rifleman assigned to the 29th Infantry Division, one of the first to land on Omaha Beach during D-Day.
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first time John Perozzi went to Sainte-Mère-Église, he parachuted into a war zone, with the crack, crack, crack of gunfire all around him. The Camden native dropped several hundred feet to a farm, helped liberate the French town, and was shot as the Allies invaded Normandy. Seventy years later, a decidedly different reception awaited him. Perozzi was greeted like a hero when he returned shortly before the June 6 anniversary of D-Day. A French woman, Cecile Gancel, who was about 11 when he parachuted onto her farm field, welcomed him with a warm embrace and pointed out where he landed.
NEWS
June 7, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the back of a C-47 transport plane, heavily armed paratroopers steeled themselves for battle. Some blackened their faces; others puffed cigarettes. All carried machine guns, carbines, ammunition, and hand grenades. "I was excited, nervous, and scared as hell," said Joe Beyer, the plane's radio operator, recalling that early morning flight across the English Channel to Nazi-occupied France. Below him, at the helm of Navy LST 359, sailor Peter Rossetti headed for the Normandy beaches with 180 Canadian soldiers, six small landing craft, two tanks, and more than a dozen jeeps.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
EXACTLY 70 years ago, 100,000 Americans (joined by 80,000 Allies) were the dice rolled in Operation Overlord - the code name for the invasion of France. Supported by 1,200 airplanes and 5,000 warships, American, British and other forces boarded transports on the coast of Britain to land on the barricaded beaches of Normandy. The largest sea assault in history was a frightful gamble because the Wehrmacht was crouched and waiting behind Hitler's bristling Atlantic Wall. Where did America find such men?
TRAVEL
November 11, 2013 | By Robin B. Smith, For The Inquirer
NORMANDY, France - At dawn on June 6, 1944, Allied forces landed on the northern coast of France, and June will mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the World War II military operation against the German march to dominate Europe, which began with American, British, and Canadian sacrifices of a magnitude unimaginable to all but survivors of infantry and invasion warfare. A visit to the Normandy beaches, invasion sites, and cemeteries is an opportunity to appreciate today's freedom by honoring not only the soldiers who died but also the survivors - and to attempt to grasp the horror of war by seeing the battlefields and mind-numbing rows of headstones.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | Associated Press
COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France - Veterans of the 1944 Normandy landings gathered Thursday at the site of history's largest amphibious invasion for a day of ceremonies marking D-Day's 69th anniversary. Around two dozen U.S. vets, some in their old uniforms pinned with medals, stood and saluted during a wreath-laying ceremony at the memorial overlooking Omaha Beach, where a U.S. cemetery holds the remains of Americans who died during the vicious battle to storm the French beach under withering Nazi fire.
NEWS
May 27, 2013
The Guns at Last Light The War in Western Europe, 1944-45 Volume Three of the Liberation Trilogy By Rick Atkinson Henry Holt, 896 pp. $38 Reviewed by Chris Patsilelis   Rick Atkinson opens The Guns at Last Light with a stirring set piece. The Allied generals are meeting to put the finishing touches on Operation Overlord, the June 6, 1944, invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Here is the 53-year-old Supreme Allied Commander, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, "a man at peace with his soul" but also a man with "high blood pressure, chronic headaches, and ringing in one ear" who smoked 80 Camels a day. Without his usual grin, he implores his staff: "I consider it to be the duty of anyone who sees a flaw in the plan not to hesitate to say so. " Here is British Field Marshal Gen. Bernard L. Montgomery, "a wiry, elfin figure" with a narrow, foxlike face "in immaculate battle dress," popping to his feet, "pointer in hand.
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