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Ombudsman

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NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie has named the dean of Seton Hall University School of Law to serve in the newly created position of ombudsman for his office - a step recommended by the review Christie commissioned as a result of the George Washington Bridge controversy. Patrick Hobbs will serve "as an independent resource to the Office of the Governor and . . . as an impartial outlet for employees to raise concerns," Christie's office said in a statement Thursday. Hobbs, who has served as dean for more than 13 years and is also chairman of a state watchdog agency, will be tasked with helping to hire a chief ethics officer and ensuring proper ethics training for employees.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All in favor of making human services more humane, call Andrew Dinniman. Plenty already have. The Chester County commissioner said he gets several calls each week from people who are confused, frustrated or angry after dealing with one of the county's human services agencies. Dinniman said he doesn't mind following up and calling whatever agency is involved for an answer - actually, it's his assistant, Stephanie Beamer, who does the legwork. But the situation has led Dinniman to conclude that an ombudsman might be a good idea.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By LOIS SNYDER
The New Jersey Office of the Ombudsman for the Institutionalized Elderly has been criticized lately for its role in continuing life support for elderly nursing home patients who are unable to make their own decisions about treatment. The charge is that the ombudsman has positioned himself as a "bureaucrat at the bedside," seeking to intervene in decisions on the very basic, difficult questions of whether to withdraw or withhold life-sustaining treatment from elderly, incompetent nursing home patients.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Her path began in a dirty, mean orphanage in Romania where few people, if any, held the babies who cried out from their cribs. Or maybe it began even earlier, when her hands trembled the first time she held a sickly, premature baby in North Carolina. For Jill Kail, the adoptions of her two physically and developmentally disabled sons were the first steps along a difficult road to overcoming their handicaps - as well as her own - and finally led to her "dream job. " Kail, a Cherry Hill resident, has finished her second week as the township's new ombudsman for the disabled.
NEWS
September 4, 1996
In an editorial yesterday, The Inquirer misidentified Francis P. Devine 3d, the chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association. The Inquirer wants its news reports to be fair and correct in every respect. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, write to Ombudsman, The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or call 215-854-2425 between 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judith Grunwell did not become a volunteer ombudsman because she wanted to be an investigator or a crusading advocate. She just missed her grandmother. "I was very close to my grandmother, and when she passed away, I thought it would be nice to do some volunteer work among older people," she said. "I even called a couple of nursing homes and asked if they had a kind of adopt-a-granny program. They must have thought I was [cuckoo]. " But Donna Eaves, Chester County's professional ombudsman for the elderly, said she thought nothing of the kind when Grunwell called to ask about the volunteer ombudsman program.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Upon review of a state investigation that exposed abuse by a nursing-home employee of an elderly client suffering from dementia, Gloucester County Bar Association president Jean McMaster said she was horrified that the findings were not shared with the woman's family. In response to McMaster's urgings, Assemblyman George Geist (R., Gloucester County) has proposed a bill that would affect protocol in abuse investigations throughout the county's 29 licensed care facilities housing people older than 60. The bill would require the Office of the Ombudsman for the Institutionalized Elderly, part of the state's senior-affairs division, to submit investigative reports to the county prosecutor and the victim's legal guardian or emergency contact in cases of abuse, neglect or exploitation.
NEWS
August 22, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Luis Silva, 54, of Mantua, ombudsman for the New Jersey Department of Corrections, died of complications from surgery Tuesday at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. Silva advocated for inmates' rights and investigated complaints about treatment and conditions in the state's correctional facilities. "His kindness, graciousness and consummate professionalism will be sorely missed," Corrections Commissioner George Hayman said. The department and the state benefited from Mr. Silva's dedication and commitment, Hayman said.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Relatives of seniors living in nursing homes would no longer be left in the dark about mistreatment of their loved ones under a bill that sailed through the state Senate yesterday, 40-0. The measure, a version of which cleared the Assembly by a 79-0 vote in June, would require the state to notify a family member or legal guardian of the outcome of any investigation into nursing-home abuse or exploitation. Now, only government agencies and the complainant in the case - usually the nursing home - are privy to those findings.
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NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie has named the dean of Seton Hall University School of Law to serve in the newly created position of ombudsman for his office - a step recommended by the review Christie commissioned as a result of the George Washington Bridge controversy. Patrick Hobbs will serve "as an independent resource to the Office of the Governor and . . . as an impartial outlet for employees to raise concerns," Christie's office said in a statement Thursday. Hobbs, who has served as dean for more than 13 years and is also chairman of a state watchdog agency, will be tasked with helping to hire a chief ethics officer and ensuring proper ethics training for employees.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Beth Fitzgerald, NJ SPOTLIGHT
When a nursing home resident can no longer make decisions, someone else has to make the tough ethical choices. Should the patient's life be prolonged with a ventilator or feeding tube? Has the time come to remove life support? What would this person have wanted? The family and the nursing home staff can wind up at loggerheads, unable to take the next step. New Jersey's ethics committees are helping families and nursing home staff make these tough decisions. The regional panels are made up of trained volunteer professionals with diverse backgrounds, including nursing, social work, long-term care, and clergy.
NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden Mayor Dana L. Redd created a "one-stop" growth team last year to try to attract businesses and development to increase the city's low tax base - $22.7 million for the $173 million 2011 budget. Despite Redd's proclamation last week in her "State of the City" address that the ombudsman and Business Growth and Development Team - comprised of city planning, development, code and legal officials, and nonprofit developers from the Cooper's Ferry Partnership - had made about 200 contacts, only a few projects have come to fruition.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie followed through on his promise to veto a bill to legalize same-sex marriage, but did it with a twist Friday: He offered to appoint an ombudsman who would ensure that civil-union licenses are recognized and respected as equal to marriage licenses, as required by state law. "Same-sex couples in a civil union deserve the very same rights and benefits enjoyed by married couples - as well as the strict enforcement of those rights and benefits,"...
NEWS
September 27, 2008 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
State Secretary of Public Welfare Estelle B. Richman is pushing to establish an independent ombudsman's office to handle issues related to children in Pennsylvania's child-welfare system. Richman said yesterday that she will form a work group, which will include everyone from child advocates to legislative staff, to discuss the pros and cons of creating the independent office. In a statement yesterday, Richman said she is acting "amid recent health and safety concerns for children involved with Pennsylvania's child-welfare system.
NEWS
August 22, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Luis Silva, 54, of Mantua, ombudsman for the New Jersey Department of Corrections, died of complications from surgery Tuesday at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. Silva advocated for inmates' rights and investigated complaints about treatment and conditions in the state's correctional facilities. "His kindness, graciousness and consummate professionalism will be sorely missed," Corrections Commissioner George Hayman said. The department and the state benefited from Mr. Silva's dedication and commitment, Hayman said.
NEWS
August 26, 2007 | Aaron Goldblatt and Laura Foster
Philadelphia Yo, what we really need you to do is . . . get the city agencies to work - through direct public accountability. Every city agency has smart, committed, capable staff. Every agency also has rude, disengaged staff. When confronted with the latter, citizens have no credible recourse and often throw up their hands in frustration. There is a pervasive lack of professionalism and public accountability by city employees. People rely on constituent services from City Council because they see no other viable method for fixing problems.
NEWS
May 3, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lee Roy Cade, 66, did something remarkable last week. He moved out of a nursing home. Cade arrived at the Centennial Village nursing home in West Philadelphia two years ago after a stroke. He needed a feeding tube and a diaper, and was unable to hold up his head. He had lost his left leg to diabetes. When he got better, he had no home or family to return to. "For a quite a number of decades, when an older person had been in a nursing home for more than three months . . . nobody thought they would leave," said Rosalie A. Kane, a professor at the University of Minnesota and national expert on long-term care.
NEWS
July 26, 2004 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In the first big speech of his administration, Gov. McGreevey declared war on sprawl. Flanked by preservationists and Environmental Commissioner Bradley Campbell, McGreevey unveiled the so-called Big Map, a blueprint to direct where development could and could not go, making enemies of builders across the state. A year and a half later, the tables have turned, and the Big Map has long since been abandoned. Now it is the environmentalists who are feuding with the McGreevey administration, concerned that a governor attempting to temper the conservation fervor of his first years in office might be swinging too sharply toward the builders' corner.
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