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Omelet

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FOOD
December 24, 2015
Serves 2 to 3 Tahini Yogurt Sauce 1/4 cup yogurt 3 tablespoons tahini ½ garlic clove, crushed 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon cumin 2 tablespoons water Salt and pepper to taste Spinach Sauce 4 cups washed spinach 1 garlic clove 1/2 cup mixed cilantro and parsley 1/4 cup cold water Salt and pepper Omelet Olive oil 2 cups mixed chopped fresh green vegetables (asparagus, broccoli,...
FOOD
June 24, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
The stuffed omelet is one of the most versatile quick and easy meals you can make. Unfortunately for the waistline watcher or cholesterol counter, the traditional omelet is off limits. If you're a veteran omelet maker, you know that conventional methods call for a layer of melted fat or oil in the omelet pan in order to keep the egg mixture from sticking while you do your shaking, tipping, rolling and flipping routine. But there are unconventional ways to make omelets without all the conventional fat and calories - using unconventional equipment.
FOOD
March 29, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Mariah Bey was the first to arrive in the kitchen for our third cooking lesson. "Hellooooo," she crooned, throwing her arms wide open to announce herself. "What are we cooking today?" "Omelets," I said. "And you get to decide what to put in. I have lots of choices: mushrooms, peppers, greens, cheese, tomatoes. And we're also going to dye eggs for Easter. " "We're going to dye eggs!" she cried, her eyes filling with excitement. "This is the best cooking class ever!" I've been cooking once a week with fifth- and sixth-grade girls from St. Martin de Porres school in North Philadelphia, with the goal of improving not only their culinary skills but also their nutrition with easy meals they can make themselves.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Sunny's Omelet Makes 2 servings 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 ounces baby spinach 4 ounces of white mushrooms, sliced Sprig of fresh or pinch of dried thyme (optional) 4 large eggs 2 teaspoons butter 1. Preheat a 10-inch nonstick sauté pan over medium heat for 2-3 minutes. 2. When the pan is hot, add oil to the pan and swirl to coat the bottom. 3. Add the mushrooms and thyme (if using) to the pan and sauté for 3-5 minutes. 4. If you used a sprig of fresh thyme, remove it and discard, add the spinach to the pan with the mushrooms, and add a pinch of salt and a pinch of pepper (optional)
FOOD
April 21, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
There is a variety of classic ways to make an omelet. Some shake the eggs in the pan; others prefer to beat them. And then there are those who subscribe to the scramble method. One chef may tell you success lies in the particular omelet pan you use and the whipping action of a wire whisk. Another will testify under oath, left hand placed on Larousse Gastronomique, that only clarified butter will do. Principles aside, it seems to be increasingly difficult to find a light, soft and creamy omelet with good structure when dining out. And even at home, many cooks are stymied when it comes to creating this simple pleasure, which dates back in legend to a hungry king of Spain who asked a peasant to prepare some food for him - quickly.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
Cooking spray, such as Pam 8 eggs 2/3 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups whole milk Dash of salt and white pepper 1/2 cup pesto 1 cup cooked chopped spinach, squeezed to remove excess water 1/4 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes in oil 2 cups grated mozzarella or other cheese Hollandaise or cheese sauce (optional, for serving)   1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 15½-by-10½-inch jelly roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
It might not have the kick of Mom's home cooking, but it sure beats a mouthful of sand. Besides, says Bill Ernst, "when you're out in the sticks somewhere and hungry, everything looks good . . . " Even an MRE. That's military lingo for Meal Ready to Eat, tastier than a K-ration, yummier than a C-ration, smaller than a bread box. And in the past 2 1/2 weeks, Ernst's employer, the Defense Personnel Support Center, at 20th and Johnston...
FOOD
June 18, 1986 | By SYBIL FINKS, Special to the Daily News
The perfect marriage: meat and eggs! Yes, they are a harmonious couple; one complements the other, while each retains its own specific flavor and texture. They have no problem staying together, while looking and tasting good to boot. For those times when you have very small amounts of any kind of leftover cooked meat, fish, or poultry, think of adding eggs to make a complete and satisfying meal. There are many ways to do this, and here are a few of them: Add bits of leftover diced, chopped or shredded meat, cold cuts, frankfurters, sausage, poultry or fish to scrambled eggs or omelets.
FOOD
June 17, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
If it's true that romance and food are closely related, then A Taste of Provence: Classic Recipes from the South of France (Little, Brown & Co., $19.95) could be called a love story. Leslie Forbes, a designer, illustrator and cook, takes the reader on an illustrated tour of one of France's outstanding food regions - a sunny place where the cuisines of both France and Italy, after centuries of blending, have reached a luscious harmony. Freshness and simplicity are the hallmarks of Provencal cooking, and Forbes has collected recipes representative of this theme.
FOOD
October 9, 1991 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
It's Sunday morning. After a long week of grab-and-go breakfasts, treat your table mates to a hearty breakfast with staying power . . . based on eggs. Why eggs? Because two eggs - 160 calories' worth - have as much prime protein as a fast-food hamburger (250 calories, or more). Eggs are lower in cholesterol than before, and now the American Heart Association says we can have up to four a week (including those in cooking) without raising our risk of heart disease. If you can't eat the cholesterol in yolks, you can make these dishes with egg whites, or a frozen substitute.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 26, 2016
Few culinary basics divide American and French kitchens quite as starkly as the omelet. In the diner tradition, the omelet is basically like a burrito - all about the stuffings, the number of eggs (where more is better), and the golden tones of color from the pan inevitably spotting the finished product. In France, where cooks believe ill-advised color accents the egg's sulphur smell, the priority is more on delicacy and luxurious fluff. And the ability to prepare a perfect one is considered an essential skill.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Sunny's Omelet Makes 2 servings 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 ounces baby spinach 4 ounces of white mushrooms, sliced Sprig of fresh or pinch of dried thyme (optional) 4 large eggs 2 teaspoons butter 1. Preheat a 10-inch nonstick sauté pan over medium heat for 2-3 minutes. 2. When the pan is hot, add oil to the pan and swirl to coat the bottom. 3. Add the mushrooms and thyme (if using) to the pan and sauté for 3-5 minutes. 4. If you used a sprig of fresh thyme, remove it and discard, add the spinach to the pan with the mushrooms, and add a pinch of salt and a pinch of pepper (optional)
FOOD
December 25, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
There is absolutely no reason (short of a doctor's warning) why you can't indulge all day long on Christmas. But for those with young children, gigantic gatherings, and/or multiple households to visit on a single day of celebrating, starting out with a sugar and fat blitz might be less than optimal. You need your energy, after all, for toy assemblage, chitchat with relatives, and daytime drinking - not to mention for enjoying all the other delicious treats to come. On the other hand, no one wants to serve dry toast or egg whites from a carton on Christmas morning.
FOOD
December 24, 2015
Serves 2 to 3 Tahini Yogurt Sauce 1/4 cup yogurt 3 tablespoons tahini ½ garlic clove, crushed 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon cumin 2 tablespoons water Salt and pepper to taste Spinach Sauce 4 cups washed spinach 1 garlic clove 1/2 cup mixed cilantro and parsley 1/4 cup cold water Salt and pepper Omelet Olive oil 2 cups mixed chopped fresh green vegetables (asparagus, broccoli,...
FOOD
March 29, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Mariah Bey was the first to arrive in the kitchen for our third cooking lesson. "Hellooooo," she crooned, throwing her arms wide open to announce herself. "What are we cooking today?" "Omelets," I said. "And you get to decide what to put in. I have lots of choices: mushrooms, peppers, greens, cheese, tomatoes. And we're also going to dye eggs for Easter. " "We're going to dye eggs!" she cried, her eyes filling with excitement. "This is the best cooking class ever!" I've been cooking once a week with fifth- and sixth-grade girls from St. Martin de Porres school in North Philadelphia, with the goal of improving not only their culinary skills but also their nutrition with easy meals they can make themselves.
NEWS
December 19, 2012
D EAR HARRY: I was invited to a free seminar on how to avoid probate and other death costs. It was well-attended, and they served a fine breakfast, to boot. Two presenters pointed out the advantages of living trusts. The second guy was as sharp a salesman as I have ever seen. He smoothly moved into a pitch for their services in creating such trusts. The fees quoted were based on the total of the assets transferred with a minimum of $1,000. He also said that the rates are going up by 20 percent next week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | Kimberly Garrison, For the Daily News
OMELETS ARE ONE of my favorite foods - delicious, nutritious and a real bargain, too. I make them with a whole egg and 2 egg whites or with all egg whites if I'm eating super clean. I mix it up with these topping choices: VEGETABLE 1 egg, 2 egg whites 1/2 cup fresh spinach 1/4 cup mushroom slices 1/4 cup red onion, chopped 1/4 cup skim mozzarella cheese 1 tablespoon spicy salsa   SALMON &  ASPARAGUS 1 egg, 2 egg whites 1/2 cup chopped asparagus 1/4 cup smoked salmon 1/4 cup cheddar cheese (optional)
NEWS
June 21, 2012
Cooking spray, such as Pam 8 eggs 2/3 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups whole milk Dash of salt and white pepper 1/2 cup pesto 1 cup cooked chopped spinach, squeezed to remove excess water 1/4 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes in oil 2 cups grated mozzarella or other cheese Hollandaise or cheese sauce (optional, for serving)   1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 15½-by-10½-inch jelly roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil.
FOOD
May 1, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
For 14 years, Maccabeam restaurant at 128 S. 12th St. has been an oasis of glatt kosher cuisine. On any given weekday, customers, many wearing traditional yarmulkes, crowd the small eatery between Walnut and Sansom streets to share platters of barbecued turkey shawarma, creamy hummus, char-broiled kebobs, and the "Maccabeam special": eggplant layered with fried onions, chickpeas and tomatoes. The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner only (closed for Shabbat, the sabbath, from 3 p.m. Friday through Saturday)
FOOD
April 21, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
There is a variety of classic ways to make an omelet. Some shake the eggs in the pan; others prefer to beat them. And then there are those who subscribe to the scramble method. One chef may tell you success lies in the particular omelet pan you use and the whipping action of a wire whisk. Another will testify under oath, left hand placed on Larousse Gastronomique, that only clarified butter will do. Principles aside, it seems to be increasingly difficult to find a light, soft and creamy omelet with good structure when dining out. And even at home, many cooks are stymied when it comes to creating this simple pleasure, which dates back in legend to a hungry king of Spain who asked a peasant to prepare some food for him - quickly.
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