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Oncology

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NEWS
October 20, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Delaware County Memorial Hospital in Drexel Hill has opened its $4.5 million radiation oncology department, bringing cancer treatment and support services together on the first floor of the adjacent medical office building. The department has a new dual-energy linear accelerator for radiation therapy and a computerized system for planning individual treatment, said spokeswoman Karen Babiak. The center's decor and easy access also make it more comfortable for visits, she said.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fox Chase Cancer Center and Temple University are combining their cancer treatment programs in an academic partnership to be announced tomorrow. The partnership gives Fox Chase easy access to non-cancer specialists, while Temple gains an affiliation with one of the nation's premier oncology programs. Neither institution adopts financial risk in the deal. "We look at this as an extension of our clinical and research mission to improve patient care and research," said Robert F. Ozols, Fox Chase senior vice president.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AMY HUNTOON
AT THE DEDICATION of the new sickle-cell anemia center at St. Christopher's Hospital, Marian Anderson (center) presents books to children who sang at the ceremonies. With the Philadelphia-born opera singer yesterday were conductor James DePreist (rear), DePreist's wife, Jinette (left), and Marie J. Stuart, the hospital's chief of hematology/oncology.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
AWARD RECIPIENT Magee Rehabilitation has named Joseph J. McLaughlin as its 1994 Humanitarian Award recipient. He was chosen for his long commitment to improving the quality of life for all people in the Delaware Valley through his charitable, business and civic affiliations for more than 40 years. McLaughlin, of Rosemont, recently retired as president and chief executive officer of Beneficial Savings Bank. He is now serves on the bank's board of managers and also serves on the boards of Peco Energy Co. and Paper Manufacturers Co. His charitable commitments include serving as chairman of Magee's board of trustees and on the boards of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, United Way of Philadelphia, and the Citizens Crime Commission of the Delaware Valley.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catherine M. Field, 68, a medical secretary who helped bring together projects such as the Ronald McDonald House while bringing comfort to cancer- stricken children and their families, died Saturday at her South Philadelphia home of 40 years. Warm and outgoing, a tallish, thin woman with a sense for knowing just when to pat a shoulder or squeeze a hand, Mrs. Field started her work with young cancer patients at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 23 years ago. Hers was the career of a hospital secretary - and much more.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Elisa Lala, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ladawna Leeth of Eastampton is living proof that cancer can, in some ways, change a person's life for the better. Despite the treatment and tribulations that accompany a diagnosis, cancer tends to put patients' priorities into perspective and refine their life goals, said Leeth, 46, the newly appointed director of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey Hamilton, an adjunct to the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital campus in Mercer County. Leeth, a 22-year thyroid cancer survivor, draws on her experience to create the best treatment plan for CINJ Hamilton's patients.
NEWS
June 26, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susane J. Zamitis, 65, of Oaklyn, a nursing instructor who taught for more than 40 years and wrote for education publications, died Sunday, June 20, at her home. She had been suffering from liver cancer. Though she loved helping people, Mrs. Zamitis did not just want to be a nurse. "Her passion was teaching," her son Robbert said. Year after year, she trained students in the classroom and during clinical sessions to help improve the quality of nursing care, said a former colleague, Debra DeVoe of Cherry Hill.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
The Valley Forge Area Convention and Visitors Bureau announced the promotions of Marjorie P. Koehler of Devon and Loretta M. Wagner of West Norriton. Koehler has been named convention sales manager. She received an undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of the Pacific, Stockton, Calif., and a master's degree from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Ill. Wanger has been appointed Group Tour Coordinator. She previously was affiliated with the Sheraton Valley Forge Hotel and the Valley Forge Convention and Exhibit Center.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Parviz Hanjani remembers Dr. Clayton T. Beecham as distinguised, knowledgeable and very, very tough. When Hanjani was being tested for his certification in obstetrics and gynecology, Dr. Beecham, a member of the board of examiners, grilled him for 50 minutes about why he would recommend a certain treatment rather than the one favored by Dr. Beecham. "He said the results were as good or better his way. He took it personally," said Hanjani, now chief of gynecology and oncology at Temple University Medical Center.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oncologist Ubaldo Martinez doesn't have enough time to address all the special needs of the growing number of elderly cancer victims who seek his help, even though he spends 90 minutes with patients the first time and 30 during subsequent visits. It's all he can do to explain their disease and its treatments to them, but so many other things can affect how they'll do. How many drugs are they taking? Are they frail? Or robust enough to race their grandkids up a hill? Do they have dementia?
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert D. Harwick, 88, a former chief of surgical oncology at Temple University Hospital, died of a myocardial infarction on Friday, Oct. 14, at his home in Wyncote. Born in Utica, N.Y., he studied at Cornell University from 1941 to 1943, in an accelerated World War II program for premedical students, before entering Cornell's medical school. Though a Cornell underclassman, he was captain of the golf team and was good enough, daughter Elizabeth Green said in an interview Tuesday, that "he had to choose between a pro golf career and medicine.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fox Chase Cancer Center and the Temple University Health System, two institutions with storied pasts and potentially turbulent futures, are looking into a possible affiliation that health-care experts say could make sense for each of them. While confirming that they had signed a letter of intent "to explore a potential affiliation," neither one would discuss the possibilities. In theory, those could range from outright merger to nothing at all. The nonprofit institutions also could simply formalize what is already shared: Temple's bone-marrow transplant program serves Fox Chase patients, university medical residents do oncology training there, and several services are shared by Fox Chase and Temple's Jeanes Hospital, which sit on opposite sides of Burholme Park in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Elisa Lala, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ladawna Leeth of Eastampton is living proof that cancer can, in some ways, change a person's life for the better. Despite the treatment and tribulations that accompany a diagnosis, cancer tends to put patients' priorities into perspective and refine their life goals, said Leeth, 46, the newly appointed director of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey Hamilton, an adjunct to the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital campus in Mercer County. Leeth, a 22-year thyroid cancer survivor, draws on her experience to create the best treatment plan for CINJ Hamilton's patients.
NEWS
June 26, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susane J. Zamitis, 65, of Oaklyn, a nursing instructor who taught for more than 40 years and wrote for education publications, died Sunday, June 20, at her home. She had been suffering from liver cancer. Though she loved helping people, Mrs. Zamitis did not just want to be a nurse. "Her passion was teaching," her son Robbert said. Year after year, she trained students in the classroom and during clinical sessions to help improve the quality of nursing care, said a former colleague, Debra DeVoe of Cherry Hill.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2008 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cephalon Inc. received clearance from regulators yesterday to begin selling Treanda as a treatment for a rare form of leukemia. The medicine will be a new option for about 15,000 people in the United States diagnosed annually with the slow-progressing form of leukemia known as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL. The Frazer, Pa., biotech company said it hoped to make Treanda the foundation for a growing oncology business. "We are extremely excited about the future of our oncology business, particularly Treanda, which is a much-needed alternative for patients," chairman and chief executive officer Frank Baldino Jr. said after word of the approval by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
September 21, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John E. Biaglow, 70, of Sicklerville, professor of radiation oncology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died of a heart attack last Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Biaglow had a reputation as a groundbreaking cancer biochemist when he joined the department of radiation oncology at Penn in 1984 and was later director until 2005. From 1987 to 1996, he directed the tumor metabolism program at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center. He published 130 articles in scientific journals.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnson & Johnson said yesterday that it would acquire 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Yardley, in a cash deal valued at $88 million. The pharmaceutical and health-care products giant will pay $5.74 for each 3-Dimensional share, which closed at $5.64 yesterday on the Nasdaq stock market. The announcement sent the small company's shares soaring $2.61, or 86.1 percent, at yesterday's close. 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals has drugs in early-stage research for treating cardiovascular disorders, oncology and inflammation.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fox Chase Cancer Center and Temple University are combining their cancer treatment programs in an academic partnership to be announced tomorrow. The partnership gives Fox Chase easy access to non-cancer specialists, while Temple gains an affiliation with one of the nation's premier oncology programs. Neither institution adopts financial risk in the deal. "We look at this as an extension of our clinical and research mission to improve patient care and research," said Robert F. Ozols, Fox Chase senior vice president.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Delaware County Memorial Hospital in Drexel Hill has opened its $4.5 million radiation oncology department, bringing cancer treatment and support services together on the first floor of the adjacent medical office building. The department has a new dual-energy linear accelerator for radiation therapy and a computerized system for planning individual treatment, said spokeswoman Karen Babiak. The center's decor and easy access also make it more comfortable for visits, she said.
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