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FOOD
May 25, 1988 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Pasta and seafood has replaced spaghetti and meatballs for today's health- wise cooks who are fashionably figure-conscious. This quick and easy combination is high in lean protein and complex carbohydrates, relatively low in cholesterol, fat and saturated fat, and rich with heart-smart Omega 3. With garden fresh veggies as part of the "sauce," these flavorful main courses are high in appetite-appeasing fiber. Rigatoni are good for waistline watchers - the tubes take up so much plate space that it takes relatively few calories' worth to make a meal.
FOOD
December 2, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
You probably have in your kitchen right now something that Columbus was looking for. Cinnamon! It was the search for an easier way to get cinnamon, and other exotic spices, that led European explorers into uncharted waters and ultimately to discover the Americas. Did you know that most of the cinnamon we get isn't cinnamon at all, but cassia? Cinnamon and cassia are the dried inner bark of two related evergreen trees in the laurel family. True cinnamon is tan, while cassia is a darker reddish brown, and the more strongly scented of the two. NORMANDY SPICED CHICKEN & RAISINS 2 chicken breasts, split 4 tablespoons raisins (preferably golden)
FOOD
January 10, 2013
Makes about 21 puffs or 5-7 servings 1 medium onion, cut    into 8 wedges 2 pounds Yukon Gold    potatoes, peeled and    cut into quarters, or    into sixths if the    potatoes are large 2 tablespoons unsalted    butter 2 large egg yolks, plus    1 whole egg 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly    ground black pepper...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2009
Dress up your dogs with these gourmet toppings. 1 large Spanish onion, sliced thin 1 small can tomato puree 1 cup Heinz chili sauce 2 cloves garlic, chopped 1/4 cup cider vinegar 1/4 cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground fennel seeds 1 teaspoon ground cloves 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon bacon fat ...
FOOD
March 1, 2012 | By Joe Gray, Chicago Tribune
Having recently fallen in love with the nutty flavor of red quinoa (say it KEEN-wah), I've been looking for ways to use the ancient grain. Updating a favorite recipe seemed like a good start. The dish, called East Indian rice, was clipped about 20 years ago from a newspaper. It's a simple rice dish with dried fruit and onions cooked right in, and flavored with curry powder, cinnamon, and ginger. Yogurt stirred in at the end makes it creamy.   Red Quinoa with Dried Fruit and Yogurt Makes 4 servings 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 small onion, finely diced 1 to 2 teaspoons chopped crystallized ginger or fresh grated ginger 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder 1 1/4 cups water 1/2 teaspoon each ground cinnamon, salt 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 cup red quinoa, rinsed, drained 1 cup diced dried mixed fruit 1/2 cup plain yogurt, at room temperature 1/2 cup salted cashews or peanuts Chopped fresh cilantro leaves 1. Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat; add onion and ginger.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer
HERE'S A recipe for Pork Albondigas from Christina Wilson's winning dinner menu on Season 10 of Fox's "Hell's Kitchen. " It has the same proportions as the dish did for the show. It makes about 60 small meatballs - perfect for a party. PORK ALBONDIGAS 2 cups Spanish onion, small dice 2 tablespoons garlic, minced 2 tablespoons shallots, fine dice 1 4-inch piece ginger, grated 4 tablespoons ground cumin 4 tablespoons ground coriander 3 tablespoons kosher salt 1 tablespoon coarse-ground black pepper 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 pounds ground pork 2 pounds hot Italian sausage, removed from casing 3 large eggs 1 cup panko bread crumbs 1 bunch cilantro, cleaned, picked and chiffonade chopped 2 bunches scallions, chiffonade 1/2 bunch mint, cleaned, picked and chiffonade 3 Serrano chilis, seeded and minced Salt and pepper to taste In a saucepan over medium flame, heat the butter and sauté the onion until translucent, about 5 minutes.
FOOD
March 12, 1995 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Call this the "you-don't-have-to" recipe. You don't have to soak black beans overnight. You don't have to invite 25 of your closest friends to help you polish off the pot. And you don't have to wait, nibbling celery sticks for hours, until dinner is ready. It's 30-Minute Black Bean Soup, as robust and mellow tasting as the slow- cooked versions. It starts with canned beans, a sure convenience. But as cooks know, soups usually need time for the seasonings to blend.
FOOD
November 19, 1986 | By NORMA SCHONWETTER, Special to the Daily News
Tex-Mex recipes provide a milder version of Mexican cuisine, lending themselves to microwave cookery. These dishes consist mainly of ground beef, tortillas and cheese. The most efficient and healthful way to microwave gorund beef with or without chopped vegetables (onion, green pepper, celery) is to place the beef mixture in a microproof (hard plastic) colander placed over a microproof bowl or casserole. Microwave on HIGH for 5 minutes per pound, stirring once, or until meat is still a little pink.
FOOD
December 27, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Eric Gower found a calling in food as an economics writer living in Japan. Now he's a private chef in San Francisco, and the author of three cookbooks. The latest, The Breakaway Cook: Recipes That Break Away from the Ordinary (William Morrow) focuses on flavor. Call it simplified fusion - fewer novelty pairings, more sensible seasoning. Whether sprinkling maccha salt (sea salt and powdered green tea) on poached eggs, braising duck legs with pickled plums and plum wine, or pan-frying flank steak with an Indian-inspired spice crust, his global approach to flavor is inspiring.
FOOD
May 29, 1994 | By Karla Cook, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even the non-onion fans among us might find themselves swayed by the mild, sweet taste of leeks, now appearing at a produce counter near you. Unlike its scallion cousin, which can be used end-to-end, the best part of a leek ranges from the white part into only the tender green part of the stems. To prepare, first trim off roots and discard the first few coarse outer leaves. Trim tops down to the 2- or 3-inch expanse of tender, light green stem; slit lengthwise. Then wash them.
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