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FOOD
August 30, 2012 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
Choose large, firm tomatoes for this, because they need to yield enough chopped flesh to add to the filling and because they will serve as edible vessels for the eggs. Cheese-Baked Egg-Stuffed Tomatoes 2 or 3 servings 3 whole-wheat pitas or 1 large flatbread 2 or 3 large tomatoes 2 medium cloves garlic 1 small onion 1 tablespoon olive oil Leaves from 2 sprigs marjoram 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric 2 or 3 large eggs Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 31/2 ounces freshly grated hard cheese, such as pecorino Romano 1 teaspoon dried za'atar (may substitute sweet paprika)
FOOD
October 21, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
When I was a little girl, my teacher said that carrots would help me see in the dark. My mother told me they'd give me curly hair, and my father said they would put "hair on your chest. " I just didn't know who to believe. Today, the promises are even more beguiling: the beta carotene in carrots help protect against cancer. Carrots are now regarded as "health food" as well as beauty food. Regardless of what else carrots can do for me, I enjoy them for what they add to a meal: crunch, color and complex flavor.
FOOD
December 3, 1986 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
One way to str-r-r-etch pasta without splitting your seams is to combine it with veggies. A diet-size portion of spaghetti or macaroni can seem like more when an equal amount of bulky vegetables is mixed in. There are a number of ways to accomplish this. You could top your pasta with a chunky sauce that's chockful of garden goodies: my Slim Gourmet Harvest Style Spaghetti Sauce, for example. Or you could combine the pasta and vegetables in an oven-baked casserole, such as the one-step Middle Eastern macaroni and cheese below.
FOOD
March 20, 1994 | By Rena Coyle, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soups are among the easiest meals your kids can make. There are plenty of steps that each age can help with, with a range of difficulty to match your child's ability. Savory Butternut and Apple Soup combines two familiar flavors; Cajun Bean Soup requires little preparation but needs to simmer and cook. Preparation time for Cajun Bean Soup is 20 minutes; soaking time, 1 hour. Cooking time is 2 hours and 5 minutes. You will need a 4-quart saucepan, cutting board, knife, strainer, can opener and measuring cups and spoons.
FOOD
May 25, 1988 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Pasta and seafood has replaced spaghetti and meatballs for today's health- wise cooks who are fashionably figure-conscious. This quick and easy combination is high in lean protein and complex carbohydrates, relatively low in cholesterol, fat and saturated fat, and rich with heart-smart Omega 3. With garden fresh veggies as part of the "sauce," these flavorful main courses are high in appetite-appeasing fiber. Rigatoni are good for waistline watchers - the tubes take up so much plate space that it takes relatively few calories' worth to make a meal.
FOOD
December 2, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
You probably have in your kitchen right now something that Columbus was looking for. Cinnamon! It was the search for an easier way to get cinnamon, and other exotic spices, that led European explorers into uncharted waters and ultimately to discover the Americas. Did you know that most of the cinnamon we get isn't cinnamon at all, but cassia? Cinnamon and cassia are the dried inner bark of two related evergreen trees in the laurel family. True cinnamon is tan, while cassia is a darker reddish brown, and the more strongly scented of the two. NORMANDY SPICED CHICKEN & RAISINS 2 chicken breasts, split 4 tablespoons raisins (preferably golden)
FOOD
January 10, 2013
Makes about 21 puffs or 5-7 servings 1 medium onion, cut    into 8 wedges 2 pounds Yukon Gold    potatoes, peeled and    cut into quarters, or    into sixths if the    potatoes are large 2 tablespoons unsalted    butter 2 large egg yolks, plus    1 whole egg 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly    ground black pepper...
FOOD
March 1, 2012 | By Joe Gray, Chicago Tribune
Having recently fallen in love with the nutty flavor of red quinoa (say it KEEN-wah), I've been looking for ways to use the ancient grain. Updating a favorite recipe seemed like a good start. The dish, called East Indian rice, was clipped about 20 years ago from a newspaper. It's a simple rice dish with dried fruit and onions cooked right in, and flavored with curry powder, cinnamon, and ginger. Yogurt stirred in at the end makes it creamy.   Red Quinoa with Dried Fruit and Yogurt Makes 4 servings 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 small onion, finely diced 1 to 2 teaspoons chopped crystallized ginger or fresh grated ginger 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder 1 1/4 cups water 1/2 teaspoon each ground cinnamon, salt 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 cup red quinoa, rinsed, drained 1 cup diced dried mixed fruit 1/2 cup plain yogurt, at room temperature 1/2 cup salted cashews or peanuts Chopped fresh cilantro leaves 1. Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat; add onion and ginger.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer
HERE'S A recipe for Pork Albondigas from Christina Wilson's winning dinner menu on Season 10 of Fox's "Hell's Kitchen. " It has the same proportions as the dish did for the show. It makes about 60 small meatballs - perfect for a party. PORK ALBONDIGAS 2 cups Spanish onion, small dice 2 tablespoons garlic, minced 2 tablespoons shallots, fine dice 1 4-inch piece ginger, grated 4 tablespoons ground cumin 4 tablespoons ground coriander 3 tablespoons kosher salt 1 tablespoon coarse-ground black pepper 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 pounds ground pork 2 pounds hot Italian sausage, removed from casing 3 large eggs 1 cup panko bread crumbs 1 bunch cilantro, cleaned, picked and chiffonade chopped 2 bunches scallions, chiffonade 1/2 bunch mint, cleaned, picked and chiffonade 3 Serrano chilis, seeded and minced Salt and pepper to taste In a saucepan over medium flame, heat the butter and sauté the onion until translucent, about 5 minutes.
FOOD
March 12, 1995 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Call this the "you-don't-have-to" recipe. You don't have to soak black beans overnight. You don't have to invite 25 of your closest friends to help you polish off the pot. And you don't have to wait, nibbling celery sticks for hours, until dinner is ready. It's 30-Minute Black Bean Soup, as robust and mellow tasting as the slow- cooked versions. It starts with canned beans, a sure convenience. But as cooks know, soups usually need time for the seasonings to blend.
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