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BUSINESS
May 1, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even when its major backer was a high-flying Internet investor, eMerge Interactive Inc. faced an uphill battle to persuade cattle ranchers to buy and sell livestock online. Skepticism over its strategy remains, and its funding from Safeguard Scientifics Inc. ended last year, but eMerge is still alive and envisioning profitability as it tries to modernize a $40-billion-a-year agrarian industry. And that's not bad in the current dot-com shake-out, said Juris Pagrabs, vice president of investor relations at eMerge.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2003 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's young. He's rich. And he's a little bit worn out. So Internet whiz kid Joshua Kopelman said yesterday that it's time for a break. Come April 15, he'll be leaving Half.com, the online business he launched in 2000 and later sold to auction giant eBay Inc. "I've been on a treadmill for quite some time," Kopelman, 32, said. "I started my first business in college. The day of graduation, I went to a business meeting. . . . It's the right time to take some time off and spend time with my family.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Web retailer that once persuaded an Oregon town to change its name to Half.com is about to see its own name wiped off the map. Half.com, the popular used-goods peddler with headquarters in Plymouth Meeting, was absorbed into its parent, Silicon Valley-based EBay Inc., yesterday. As a result, over the next six months, the Half.com brand name will gradually disappear from the Web, company officials said. EBay announced 18 layoffs and 28 job relocations at Half.com in connection with the changes.
NEWS
January 23, 2010 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sale of a government fire truck in Montgomery County used to be a process teeming with paperwork. The required mailings, bid applications, and newspaper advertising cost money, and often resulted in selling government property on the cheap. The Pottstown-based municibid.com has changed that. Township merchandise is now a click away from a vast online audience, resulting in more bids and more money. And the selling process has been streamlined. It's post, bid, and pick up. "I can absolutely say that it has broadened what we are able to sell," F. Thomas Snyder, chief procurement officer for Montgomery County, said of municibid.
NEWS
October 27, 2001 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Online auctions have had their share of complications and controversy, but a sale being conducted jointly by two dot-com outfits, eBay and Spencergo, is of too much local interest to be ignored. It is the theater and film collection of the late Frank C. P. McGlinn. McGlinn was not only an influential political and civic figure, he also was a great patron of the arts, having served as chairman of the Walnut Street Theatre and as a lifetime trustee of the Actors Fund of America. While some of his collection was sold at auction a year or so ago, the bulk of it was held back for online bidding, which is now just getting started.
SPORTS
May 3, 2001 | by Ted Taylor For the Daily News
A few weeks ago the Wall Street Journal ran a front-page story on the resurgence and widespread popularity of bobble-head dolls. The article noted the following: 20 major league baseball teams will release bobble-head dolls this season; 12 NBA teams have or will be releasing bobble-head dolls this season (like the Sixers' high-demand Allen Iverson doll a few months ago); and 40 colleges also are planning to release dolls. The story refers to bobble-head dolls as the "Beanie Babies of the new millennium.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1999 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You can lock the doors, bar the windows, and turn on the alarm. But if you answer your telephone or go online with your computer, you still risk letting a thief into your life. That's the message from government investigators and consumer advocates who pursue allegations of fraud. Telemarketing scams alone cost Americans as much as $40 billion a year, federal officials estimate. Getting bilked is often just a matter of being too gullible when a caller offers something especially appealing.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Two online auctions ending this weekend will offer stay-at-home bidding on a variety of collectibles, including coins - and toy banks to put them in. The coins, plus some currency, will be offered by the Auction House Inc., formerly Audubon's Auctioneers, at a sale where online bidding has already begun at www.Auctionzip.com . Live bidding will start at 11 a.m. Saturday at the gallery at 100 W. Merchant St. in Audubon, N.J. The 70...
LIVING
February 13, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The millions of moviegoers who enjoyed Cast Away thought they'd seen the last of Wilson when the faithful volleyball drifted away from Tom Hanks' raft. But Wilson - who is a lock for a best-supporting-volleyball bid when Oscar nominations are announced today - is very much alive after a profitable foray in cyberspace. He was the prize catch in a recent online auction of Cast Away props run by 20th Century Fox. The winning bid: $21,000 for a ball that costs less than $30 (and isn't shredded)
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The gravel lot tucked into a remote area of Gloucester County once housed a fleet of 100 yellow school buses that would rumble back and forth on weekdays. But when Hurricane Sandy hit in the fall - soon after the bus company moved out - the empty lot in Glassboro was assigned a new purpose: More than 300 vehicles that were damaged by raging rivers of saltwater were hauled to the five-acre property, Glassboro officials said. In New Jersey, lots like these have been tapped to temporarily hold an estimated 72,000 devastated cars, trucks, boats, and jet skis while they are processed for resale or salvaged parts.
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SPORTS
February 23, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
After his death in 2011, Joe Frazier's children filled a Philadelphia storage unit with the heavyweight champion's personal belongings. They saved an oversize photograph of Frazier's knockdown of Muhammad Ali, a trophy celebrating his 1964 Olympic gold medal, and even the ring ropes and punching bags from Frazier's North Broad Street boxing gym. His 11 children planned to keep the collection for themselves. "But then we thought, what would our father think?" said Frazier's daughter, Weatta Collins.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last year, everything that sails, flies, drives, and trots has been auctioned - from horses and five-ton military trucks to a 747 jumbo jet, Navy cruiser, Army tugboat, and Coast Guard cutter. The sales have included ammunition cans, vacuums, backpacks, bomber jackets, bulldozers, cameras, and medical, audio, video, camping, and exercise equipment. Ever wonder what happens to surplus items retired by the U.S. Defense Department? They are purchased by businesses and individuals who give them a second career in the civilian world.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The gravel lot tucked into a remote area of Gloucester County once housed a fleet of 100 yellow school buses that would rumble back and forth on weekdays. But when Hurricane Sandy hit in the fall - soon after the bus company moved out - the empty lot in Glassboro was assigned a new purpose: More than 300 vehicles that were damaged by raging rivers of saltwater were hauled to the five-acre property, Glassboro officials said. In New Jersey, lots like these have been tapped to temporarily hold an estimated 72,000 devastated cars, trucks, boats, and jet skis while they are processed for resale or salvaged parts.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Shannon Dininny, Associated Press
YAKIMA, Wash. - Washington state opened a public auction online Thursday of its state-run liquor stores, beginning the privatizing of a booze industry the state has tightly controlled since the end of Prohibition. Within hours, more than 30 bidders had entered. Nearly a dozen offered to buy rights to all the stores, though most bid on individual store locations. The minimum bid: $1,000. Venturing into store ownership isn't without its risks, given the upheaval in the state's liquor industry.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Two online auctions ending this weekend will offer stay-at-home bidding on a variety of collectibles, including coins - and toy banks to put them in. The coins, plus some currency, will be offered by the Auction House Inc., formerly Audubon's Auctioneers, at a sale where online bidding has already begun at www.Auctionzip.com . Live bidding will start at 11 a.m. Saturday at the gallery at 100 W. Merchant St. in Audubon, N.J. The 70...
NEWS
January 23, 2010 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sale of a government fire truck in Montgomery County used to be a process teeming with paperwork. The required mailings, bid applications, and newspaper advertising cost money, and often resulted in selling government property on the cheap. The Pottstown-based municibid.com has changed that. Township merchandise is now a click away from a vast online audience, resulting in more bids and more money. And the selling process has been streamlined. It's post, bid, and pick up. "I can absolutely say that it has broadened what we are able to sell," F. Thomas Snyder, chief procurement officer for Montgomery County, said of municibid.
NEWS
February 1, 2008 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Challenged to make art out of underwear, Paul Palcko had to ponder. "The hardest part was figuring out how to work on it, because, essentially, it's sculpture," said the editorial illustrator, 32, who chose oil paint and stuffed the corset with a blanket. The result, gorgeously rendered in blue, red and gold leaf, with an angel's face gazing skyward, is called "Support" - and aptly named as part of the unique collaboration of area artists, lingerie designers, the burlesque troupe Bawdy Girls, and avant-gardistes who will gather tonight in Northern Liberties to begin a monthlong online auction of 18 fanciful "corsets for a cure," with proceeds going to Philadelphia's Linda Creed Breast Cancer Foundation.
NEWS
January 30, 2008 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Jo Pletz was really, really good at eBay. But now the former stay-at-home mother and gonzo Internet retailer fears a maximum $10 million fine for selling 10,000 toys, antiques, videos, sports memorabilia, books, tools and infant clothes on eBay without an auctioneer's license. An official from the Department of State knocked on Pletz's white-brick ranch here north of Allentown in late December 2006 and said her Internet business, D&J Virtual Consignment, was being investigated for violating state laws.
NEWS
May 25, 2007 | By Amy Hoak, MARKETWATCH
The dirty, tarnished bracelet sold for 50 cents, but it cleaned up to reveal a sterling silver and 18-karat gold piece of jewelry worth several hundred dollars. It's one of Jenn Callum's best finds, and an example of why - even in the age of the online auction - many treasure hunters still seek out traditional garage sales. Call it a yard sale, a tag sale, a rummage sale, or a boot sale, but don't call it a relic that has been rendered obsolete. In fact, the Internet is increasingly complementing garage sales, making it easier to connect buyers and sellers who once relied solely on newspaper advertisements and roadside signs.
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