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NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two months ago, to take a course from the University of Pennsylvania's medical school, you needed to excel at a grueling admissions test and pray you were one of the few who got accepted - not to mention pay tuition once you got there. Now you can stumble out of bed halfway around the world and still catch courses taught by Penn medical professors. All for free, at the moment. Both the medical school and the university are amping up their participation in the online education game.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By John Mooney, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jersey legislators got a crash course in online education this week, from virtual schools to "blended" ones, and how far other states and countries have gone with the technology. The committee held the special session Wednesday to discuss the various models, as the Christie administration has moved ahead in approving charter schools employing the technology in levels not seen before in the state. Two charter schools have been approved that would be entirely online, with students taking class from home or other remote locations.
NEWS
May 9, 2009 | By Zoe Tillman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a trade conference for educators several years ago in Boston, Peirce College president Arthur Lendo was shocked to hear his school held up as a model of online education. The speaker didn't know that the president of the small, Philadelphia-based college was in the audience, and Lendo said he "had a hard time keeping a straight face. " Lendo, 63, will retire from Peirce next month after 18 years as president. His greatest legacy, he said, is the school's transformation into a regional hub for online education.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2001 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten students who have completed their senior year of high school by taking Internet courses at home will don blue caps and gowns tomorrow night in Pittsburgh. The seniors will watch a videotaped address by Gov. Ridge, and they will receive commemorative CDs containing the governor's remarks and video clips of every member of the class. Finally, they will be handed the very first diplomas conferred by the Western Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School. "It is going to be a salute to these pioneers," said Nick Trombetta, chief administrator of the cyber school and superintendent of Midland Borough School District in Beaver County.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A massive national study of online charter schools has found that 70 percent of students at cyber schools are falling behind their peers at traditional public institutions. The study, released Tuesday by three policy and research centers, found the online schools have an "overwhelming negative impact. " Stanford University researchers said their analysis showed severe shortfalls in reading and math achievement. The shortfall for most cyber students, they said, was equal to losing 72 days of learning in reading and 180 days in math during the typical 180-day school year.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Have you ever wanted to invest in a young person - invest in him or her as you would a stock or a bond? Basically, investing in the person's future value? Now you can, via a website called Upstart. Dave Girouard, Upstart's cofounder and CEO, was formerly president of Google Enterprise, and dreamed up the idea of backing young people financially. Rather than invest in a company, Upstart backers invest in young people, like University of Pennsylvania 2012 graduate Michael Olorunnisola.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mechanical engineer who has served as provost of Stony Brook University since 2011 will become the next president of the University of Delaware. Dennis Assanis, who has collected five patents over his career and specializes in improving automobile fuel economy and lessening emissions, takes over July 1. His appointment was approved by the board of trustees Wednesday. Assanis, who was a professor and administrator at the University of Michigan for 17 years, said meeting the needs of a diverse student body would be a priority.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
Pennsylvania higher education officials took a contentious pay cut off the table in contract talks with state university faculty Friday, but the union said it intended to press ahead with strike-authorization votes next week. The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties said the sides remain at odds on issues including compensation for temporary instructors, health-care benefits, and online education. During talks Friday in Harrisburg, negotiators for the State System of Higher Education withdrew a proposal for a 35 percent salary cut for temporary, or adjunct, faculty.
NEWS
January 5, 2013
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania higher education officials are heading back to the negotiating table with the union representing state university faculty. The sides are to meet Friday for the first discussions since Dec. 11. Members of the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties have been working without a contract for about 18 months. Bargaining has stalled over issues including pay for part-time instructors, health-care benefits, and compensation for online education.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
New Jersey higher-education grants totaling about $11 million to Beth Medrash Govoha yeshiva and Princeton Theology Seminary are unconstitutional, a panel of state appellate judges ruled Thursday. The American Civil Liberties Union led a lawsuit filed in June 2013 against Rochelle Hendricks, the state secretary of higher education, and Andrew P. Sidamon-Eristoff, then the state treasurer. The ACLU says the grants of $10.6 million to the yeshiva and $645,000 to the seminary were unconstitutional because of the schools' religious nature.
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NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
New Jersey higher-education grants totaling about $11 million to Beth Medrash Govoha yeshiva and Princeton Theology Seminary are unconstitutional, a panel of state appellate judges ruled Thursday. The American Civil Liberties Union led a lawsuit filed in June 2013 against Rochelle Hendricks, the state secretary of higher education, and Andrew P. Sidamon-Eristoff, then the state treasurer. The ACLU says the grants of $10.6 million to the yeshiva and $645,000 to the seminary were unconstitutional because of the schools' religious nature.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mechanical engineer who has served as provost of Stony Brook University since 2011 will become the next president of the University of Delaware. Dennis Assanis, who has collected five patents over his career and specializes in improving automobile fuel economy and lessening emissions, takes over July 1. His appointment was approved by the board of trustees Wednesday. Assanis, who was a professor and administrator at the University of Michigan for 17 years, said meeting the needs of a diverse student body would be a priority.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A massive national study of online charter schools has found that 70 percent of students at cyber schools are falling behind their peers at traditional public institutions. The study, released Tuesday by three policy and research centers, found the online schools have an "overwhelming negative impact. " Stanford University researchers said their analysis showed severe shortfalls in reading and math achievement. The shortfall for most cyber students, they said, was equal to losing 72 days of learning in reading and 180 days in math during the typical 180-day school year.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
You'd be hard-pressed to find a college not offering online courses. Some are cheap alternatives to traditional schooling. Here are some things to consider about inexpensive distance learning. Coursera offers free online access to hundreds of college courses from Yale, Peking University, Penn State and 106 other institutions of higher learning. That's impressive, but can you get real credit for taking a course on Coursera? Yes, in a way. Within a few weeks of starting a course, you can decide to opt for Signature Tracking.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
For six years, Alessandra Mullin excelled at Masterman, one of the top schools in the state. But when she heard about a new cyber venture of the Philadelphia School District, she was intrigued. Mullin dances with the Pennsylvania Ballet, and switching to online education would allow her to pursue her dream of dancing full time, she reasoned. The Philadelphia Virtual Academy wasn't an easy sell, though - her parents were loath to allow Mullin to surrender her seat in such a good school, especially in her last year of high school.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Have you ever wanted to invest in a young person - invest in him or her as you would a stock or a bond? Basically, investing in the person's future value? Now you can, via a website called Upstart. Dave Girouard, Upstart's cofounder and CEO, was formerly president of Google Enterprise, and dreamed up the idea of backing young people financially. Rather than invest in a company, Upstart backers invest in young people, like University of Pennsylvania 2012 graduate Michael Olorunnisola.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Sex sells in the video industry. So do horror and romance. But power tools, blowtorches, and drafting software? They've indeed been the props in instructional productions that have sustained a family-run video business in Chadds Ford for 43 years. Bergwall Productions Inc.'s work - dating from the era of filmstrips (remember those?) - is classroom fare, intended mostly for viewing at community colleges and technical high schools. Through three generations of Bergwalls, the company has been creating how-to guides for industrial-arts students.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Raise Labs Inc. , of San Francisco, last week climbed to the top of the 2013 Milken-Penn Graduate School of Education Business Plan Competition - one of several recent competitive business events. Raise, which wants to change how college scholarships are distributed, won three $25,000 prizes: the Milken Family Foundation First Prize, the Startl Prize for Open Educational Resources, and the K12 Prize for Online Learning in Grades K-12. It's the latest win for Raise, which landed $100,000 from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation-based College Knowledge Challenge in January.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a six-month global search for the next president of Princeton University, the board of trustees ended up choosing the school's second-in-command. Princeton provost Christopher L. Eisgruber will succeed Shirley M. Tilghman as the university's 20th president effective July 1, the board announced Sunday. Eisgruber's deep ties to the university, his leadership as provost during the recession, and his "instinct for transparency" made him a standout candidate from the start, university board of trustees chairwoman Kathryn Hall said.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The flagship state colleges in Pennsylvania and New Jersey announced steps Thursday to begin offering open online courses to the masses free. Both Pennsylvania State University and Rutgers University said they were partnering with Coursera - a California-based online education company that has been a pioneer in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). They join a growing number of universities around the country, including the University of Pennsylvania, that have begun to experiment with the movement to provide courses free to hundreds of thousands around the globe.
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