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NEWS
March 27, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Now I've seen everything. Apparently there are people in this world who are supposed to be working on their computers, but spend so much time cruising the Internet, playing online games, and posting on Facebook that they go out and buy an application to lock them out of their fun and games, so that they force themselves to use their computer only for work and research. I'm not making that up. The app is called Self-Control, and I'm not making that up, either. Once you install Self-Control, it can't be disabled in any way, even by turning off the computer and restarting it. You install the app and set it for a certain amount of time, like three hours, and you get no access to any of your time-wasters until the time is up. Amazing, right?
NEWS
May 2, 2016
Paul Halpern is a University of the Sciences physics professor and the author of "Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics" One of the stunning breakthroughs of the 21st century is the ability to share massive amounts of information instantaneously, virtually anywhere around the world. Communication is no longer confined to particular locations or times. A boy in Malaysia can play chess with a girl in Brazil while posting on Facebook, based in the United States, and commenting on a Reddit thread started in the United Kingdom.
NEWS
April 30, 2008 | By James S. Pappas
As Pennsylvania introduces its first slots casinos, the issue of problem gambling may come to the forefront. In the first of two commentaries on this subject, we learn who is abusing gambling, why, and what can be done to help. More than 80 percent of Americans engage in some form of gambling: buying lottery tickets, betting on horse races, playing bingo, or visiting casinos. Most have no problems. They set limits for their time and money - and stick to them. Then there are the problem gamblers, people with difficulties ranging from mild to very severe.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lee Rainie wants to know what you did online yesterday, but he isn't stealing your cookies to find out. He comes right out and asks. Beleaguered e-commerce market researchers may fret over Web-site hit counts, worry about abandoned online "shopping carts," and secretly pluck at the data files called cookies on individuals' hard drives - all in efforts to sell more to wired consumers. But Rainie, director of the year-old, nonprofit Pew Internet and American Life Project, is more interested in such social questions as, why don't some people like the Internet at all?
BUSINESS
October 17, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Bally Technologies Inc. showcased its most popular games, including Cash Spin, on several platforms here this month at the Global Gaming Expo (G2E). There was Cash Spin as a traditional slot machine; Cash Spin on an iPod, Droid, BlackBerry, and iTouch tablet; and Cash Spin as an online game at the Bally Interactive booth at the Sands Expo & Convention Center. As one of the world's largest suppliers of slot machines and systems that operate casinos, Bally and companies like it are gearing up for what many say will be gambling's next frontier: the Internet.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Stephen Weber saw an ad seeking participants to help determine whether online games could improve brain function, it was, well, a no-brainer. The Drexel senior would get paid for what sounded to him like playing Nintendo. Maybe it could even help him remedy his weakness in math, he thought. So he signed up for a University of Pennsylvania study on "the effects of Lumosity on brain activity and decision-making behavior. " There's much more at stake here than the fortunes of an industry whose revenue is expected to hit $6 billion a year by 2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2003 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If searching for hidden treasure conjures images of a one-legged pirate and a mysterious island map marked with an "X," your imagination may be ready for an upgrade. Go to www.Geocaching.com, plug in your zip code, and select a treasure that sounds intriguing - say, "Alien Transport Portal #2. " Now enter the coordinates into your handheld GPS and head outdoors, where you'll use satellite navigation to find it. With a little luck, you will. Then you'll take something out of "cache," put something in for the next guy, hike home, and log back on to the Web to share your experience with a virtual community worldwide.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
By LouAnn Buhrows Who are you on social media? Your everyday-pack-a-lunch self or a different persona you've created for the digital stage? Odds are it's the latter, because even what-you-see-is-what-you-get types are different online than in person. That's not a bad thing. After all, we look different online, carefully cropping photos so only the best angles show. It's amazingly easy to take a glamour shot with a smartphone, though it might take several attempts. But you find it - just the right shot - for the role you want to play.
SPORTS
February 11, 2006 | INQUIRER STAFF
CSTV Networks and the Atlantic Ten Conference kick off their live video online coverage this weekend and through March 10 will feature 18 men's and five women's basketball games. CSTV is making games available as part of CSTV.com's XXL broadband package, for $14.95 per month, and will give access to Atlantic Ten games as well as sports from more than 90 other schools. In September, CSTV will begin carrying Atlantic Ten sports on television and broadband from all 14 schools.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
THE GIZMO: Sega Dreamcast and SegaNet online service; $149 for console, $21.95 per month for service. Hardware rebate and free keyboard with 18-month service commitment. Sega of America, 650 Townsend St., San Francisco, Calif. 94103-4908. www.sega.com WHY WE CARE: Mirror, mirror on the wall. What really is the future of home video game systems? Is it a higher-resolution player that runs past and new-generation games and also doubles as a DVD movie spinner, like the Sony PlayStation 2, coming Oct. 26?
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