FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 28, 2005 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former finance manager of a Mount Airy food co-op has reached an agreement that will allow her to avoid jail time on charges that she stole money from the co-op. Andrea Sheaffer agreed last week to pay the Weaver's Way Co-op $30,000 in restitution and to issue an apology to the co-op, at 559 Carpenter Lane in Mount Airy, according to the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office. Sheaffer's financial dealings nearly forced the collapse of Weaver's Way in 2002, officials said.
NEWS
June 25, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What it is: Swarthmore Co-op, one of the oldest cooperative grocery stores in the country, offers locally grown produce and organic and natural foods, as well as fresh meats, prepared meals and bakery items. You don't have to be a member to shop there. What we like: It's a friendly, community-oriented store that deals with a lot of local suppliers for everything from fresh strawberries to raspberry jelly rolls. And if a customer really wants a certain item, general manager Jack Cavanaugh will try to stock it. The co-op gets some of its produce from Linvilla Orchards in Middletown and Pete's Produce in Westtown.
LIVING
September 13, 1987 | By Dodge Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
Maureen McGeehan graduated two years ago from Drexel University with on- the-job experience, eight job offers and money in her pocket instead of college debts. McGeehan was one of the nearly 175,000 students nationwide working annually in a cooperative education program, alternating semesters in class with semesters in the field. Such students earn as they learn how their studies apply in the world outside. "When I got sick of studying, it was time to go to work. And when I got tired of working, it was time to head back to class," says McGeehan.
NEWS
May 17, 2005
THIS LETTER is to let you know that I have the back of all the Sixers fans (and all Philly fans for that matter) who were unjustifiably taken to task by Brad Geiger in his recent op-ed. How dare he call out Sixers fans because they didn't "rise to the moment" and fill the house for Game 4 of the recent playoff series. Sixers fans are so loyal, so passionate and so knowledgeable that I won't even dignify Mr. Geiger's incredible statements with any type of lengthy argument. None is necessary.
NEWS
January 9, 2006
AS ONE OF THE plaintiffs in the recent successful verdict against the School District of Philadelphia, I take issue with some of the points that Rotan Lee made in his Dec. 28 op-ed, "In Defense of Carl and the Cracker Slur. " I have no problem with Mr. Lee's defense of Carl Singley's outburst as "venting. " What I do resent is his contention that there was "backslapping jocularity between the plaintiffs and the jurors. " First of all, Mr. Lee wasn't there in the courthouse and wouldn't know firsthand what transpired.
NEWS
December 2, 1995 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The holdup man fled when the cashier shot back - with a camera. Camden police said Sone Lin, 20, was tending the counter at the Happy Dragon Restaurant about 7 Thursday evening when a man came in with his hand placed in his jacket in a way that suggested he had a gun. "Give me $300 or I'll kill you," the man said. Instead of going to the cash register, Sone picked up a 35mm camera and clicked. The startled robber ran from the store and Sone, 20, called police. Investigators rode with Sone through the neighborhood, and they spotted Manuel Melandez, 19, of the 100 block of Eutaw Street.
NEWS
August 13, 2008
THE OP-ED "Phony Drunken Driving stats" by Sarah Longwell was long overdue. In January 1994, I wrote that MADD's credibility was in question since its emphasis on arrest numbers seemingly overshadowed the real goal of highway safety. It seemed that MADD was upset because, in '92, there was reported a 12 percent drop in the number of "drunken driving offenders. " In an August column, I expressed outrage over MADD's campaign to lower the BAC from 0.10 to 0.08. I also condemned the MADD-supported and unconstitutional ALS (administrative license suspension)
NEWS
May 10, 2004
I AM APPALLED at the op-ed you featured on the Special Olympics. Without even getting into my opinion on such segregated activities, ones in which people with disabilities are seen as pitiful and less than worthy of participation in society with the rest of the human race, you need to know that your language is offensive and demeaning. "Mentally handicapped"? "Emotionally retarded"? "Retarded"? These terms are as offensive as any racial or ethnic slur. And how comforting to know that the Special Olympics segregates individuals according to their IQ and so-called "ability levels.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
"We're all mothers, we all work, we all enjoy being together, and we all love to garden," explains Jean Hunt as she describes the beginnings of the Philadelphia garden co-op she developed with Marilyn Wood, Pat Urevick and Pat MacFarland. Chatting one day last winter, they decided that to make light work of bed building and patio installation, they would pool their resources and work together. The system had worked for car pooling, babysitting and vacations. Why couldn't it work outside in the garden?
NEWS
April 16, 2008
RE THE op-ed "How Hillary lost my vote": Ms. Spector made a major misstep in suggesting that Sen. Clinton essentially be let off the hook for her Iraq war vote, while Sen. McCain should be held accountable for having "cuddled" up to the Bush administration. The quotes: "If you had voted against it, would you have been able to have a seat at the table with the big boys or been derided as a weak sister who didn't have enough patriotism to put country ahead of politics?" and "But, perhaps even more than that, I don't want John McCain.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Royer Cooper Cohen Braunfeld has moved its Center City operations from 1700 Market Street to larger offices at Two Logan Square to accommodate increasing demand, the Conshohocken-based law firm said Thursday. The firm relocated at the beginning of March to a 7,800-square-foot space at the new location, for which it has a lease of roughly six years, executive partner Neil Cooper said. Its previous Center City operations occupied 3,700 square feet. The firm opened its satellite at 1700 Market on a temporary basis in 2014 to "test the waters" in Center City, but quickly outgrew the space, Cooper said.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
By Helen W. Mallon Just days after the Oscar for Best Picture went to Spotlight , the movie detailing how the Boston Globe pursued the child sexual-abuse scandal and cover-up by the local archdiocese, a similar story was reported out of Western Pennsylvania. A grand jury investigation into the Archdiocese of Altoona-Johnstown revealed that hundreds of children were sexually abused by priests over a span of 40 years. And, once again, church officials were accused of participating in a massive cover-up.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
By Kenyatta Johnson As our communities develop, we must protect everyone, including long-term homeowners with low to moderate incomes. To ensure these residents aren't priced out of their homes, we must extend the Longtime Owner Occupancy Program (LOOP). LOOP is a 10-year real estate tax discount for longtime city homeowners whose neighborhoods are experiencing rapid development and drastic increases in property assessments under the Actual Value Initiative (AVI). Originally called "Gentrification Relief," LOOP is designed to prevent unaffordable real estate spikes in gentrifying neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
By Kelvin A. Jeremiah The surge of growth and prosperity in many Center City neighborhoods is having little impact on Philadelphia's 400,000 families living below the poverty line. Struggling daily to meet basic needs, a Philadelphia family must earn $45,400 annually to afford a two-bedroom apartment, according to a 2014 report issued by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. However, the 2015 average annual income of Philadelphia Housing Authority's (PHA) current and wait-listed families remained at $15,300.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
By Peter J. Pitts In an attempt to halt Bernie Sanders' rise in the polls, Hillary Clinton is waging a campaign against his single-payer health plan. Remarkably, one of Clinton's main criticisms is that Sanders' scheme would undermine the cause of federally controlled health care by giving too much power to the states. Yes, we must be in an election year. As Clinton has put it, Sanders "wants to roll Medicare, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, the Affordable Care Act program, and private health insurance into a national system and turn it over to the states to administer.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Karen Stokes
We are three months into Mayor Kenney's term. In the wake of his first budget address, I am reminded of the small role I played in easing his transition into office, and of the more than 25,000 dedicated city employees who often don't get the credit they deserve. Together, we provided the mayor with important "tools" that allow him to advance his agenda and ensure a seamless flow of services to Philadelphia's residents. A year before his term in office ended, Mayor Michael Nutter hired me to design and manage a transition plan.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Betsy E. Huber
F ield of Dreams , the iconic 1980s movie, coined the phrase, "If you build it, they will come. " As it pertains to energy infrastructure, Pennsylvania needs to follow the same philosophy. Not long ago many were concerned about the cost and availability of much-needed energy resources. Gas crept north of $4 a gallon and some residents in the Northeast, including Pennsylvanians, felt the effects of propane shortages during cold winter months. With the development of the Marcellus shale in Western Pennsylvania, we have an opportunity to play a major role to ensure increased access to affordable, clean-burning energy resources.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By William Goodfellow
The populist presidential campaigns of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump have been fueled by the deep disillusionment millions of Americans feel about what they believe is a rigged political and economic system. A stark rift has opened between those two candidates and the establishment wings of the two parties. A similar rift has opened over foreign policy, and the issue separating the populists from the establishment candidates is the Iraq war. In October 2002, Sen. Hillary Clinton voted for the resolution to authorize the use of force against Iraq.
NEWS
March 4, 2016
By Christopher D. Benson There couldn't have been a better moment for the movie Spotlight to win at the Academy Awards - for best picture and best original screenplay. Coming within days of GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump's threatening remarks on freedom of the press, these Oscars serve as validation of the journalism profession. They also recognize the rendering of the story behind the story of the Boston Globe's Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative series exposing sexual abuse by Catholic priests.
NEWS
March 4, 2016
By Karen Murphy Drug overdose deaths are claiming the lives of more Pennsylvanians today than even motor vehicle accidents. In 2014, 2,500 individuals - seven people a day - succumbed to fatal overdoses from prescription opioids and heroin in the commonwealth, a staggering 20 percent increase over the previous year. Sadly, we expect that number to grow when 2015 statistics are released this summer. Drug addiction is the public health crisis of our time. In fact, it is the worst public health crisis I have seen in more than 30 years as a health professional.
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