IN THE NEWS

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NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Never leave anything unsaid is a lesson former Gov. Ed Rendell may have relearned the hard way this week. Two days ago, the usually loquacious Democrat had an op-ed piece published in the New York Daily News urging New York state to get over its fears and permit hydraulic fracturing - commonly known as fracking - to seek natural gas within its borders. In the piece, headlined "Why [Gov. Andrew] Cuomo Must Seize the Moment on Hydrofracking," Rendell listed the benefits of natural gas for the region's economic development as well as the nation's energy future.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghanistan's president on Wednesday relented in his demand for all U.S. special-operations forces to withdraw from a strategic province east of the capital, agreeing to a compromise calling for the pullout of one team implicated in abuse allegations that the Americans have rejected. The dispute underscores the fragile negotiations under way as Hamid Karzai seeks to redefine and expand control of his country and the United States and its allies prepare to end their combat missions by the end of 2014.
SPORTS
March 2, 2013
On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a statistic that adds a player's on-base percentage and slugging percentage. It values things such as walks and extra-base hits that batting average cannot measure. The major-league average in 2012 was .724. Baseball's best hitters will typically post an .850 OPS or higher. Miguel Cabrera led the majors with a .999 OPS in 2012.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Juan Forero, Washington Post
CARACAS, Venezuela - Sixty-seven days after Venezuelans last saw him, President Hugo Chavez reappeared Friday, when government officials televised photographs of him recuperating in Cuba with two of his daughters at his side. The images were the first evidence presented to Venezuelans that Chavez, who was last seen Dec. 10 when he boarded a plane to Cuba for a fourth surgery to remove cancerous tissue, was alive and convalescing. In the photos, Chavez smiles from a hospital bed while flanked by daughters Maria Gabriela and Rosa Virginia.
FOOD
January 25, 2013 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
For years, Elkins Park neighbors sadly viewed the building that was Ashbourne Market, a store and local hub across from the train station that closed in 2002. Snubbed by developers, it had for a time become an odd, little-used farmer's market. "It was a ghost town," said Max Minkoff, a local entrepreneur. "Tumbleweeds. " If a grocery would not take the location, perhaps a food co-op would work, the neighbors decided at a meeting five years ago at the local library. Co-ops operate by and for their members, and try simply to break even.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is stepping up aid for Mexico's bloody drug war with a new U.S.-based special-operations headquarters to teach Mexican security forces how to hunt drug cartels the same way special operations teams hunt al-Qaeda, according to documents and interviews with multiple U.S. officials. Such assistance could help newly elected Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto establish a military force to focus on drug criminal networks that have terrorized Mexico's northern states and threatened the Southwest border.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
If you combed through the piano recital programs of the coming year and put the most forbidding pieces into one concert, you'd have Ieva Jokubaviciute's recital Thursday at Settlement Music School. In the program, titled " New Century, New Paths" and presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, this fully matured Lithuanian pianist skillfully guided one's ears through Debussy, Schoenberg, Scriabin, Janacek, and Berg in performances that confidently created a trajectory from which all the composers benefited.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | LOS ANGELES TIMES
  KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - U.S. and Afghan military forces rescued an American doctor who had been kidnapped by the Taliban in eastern Afghanistan, military authorities said Sunday. Officials in Washington later confirmed that one of the rescuers was killed in the operation. The kidnapped doctor, identified as Dilip Joseph, a U.S. citizen working for a nonprofit group based in Colorado, was rescued along with two Afghan doctors and an Afghan driver, according to international forces and local Afghan officials.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
If you listened for it Tuesday morning, you could hear the stirrings of Elkins Park's long-suffering heart. It was the rustling sound of Karen Irgang bagging a 29-cent dinner roll from Liscio's Bakery. And of Janice Hayes-Cha, plopping Stayman-Winesap apples from Frecon Farms into her shopping cart. It was the squawk of Ralph Kirk's squeegee on the sliding glass doors as Creekside Co-op, which, after a gestation that lasted five long years, had finally opened for business. "A wonderful thing," pronounced Aliza Green, the local cookbook author, savoring the sparkling market, painted spring green and autumn orange.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | BY ROB SMITH
A YEAR AGO, if I'd said I was worried about "sequestration," most folks would have figured I needed a doctor and wondered if it was something they could catch. But by now, just about everyone knows it means a trillion dollars in automatic budget cuts that start in January 2013. It's part of the so-called "fiscal cliff" that was put in motion when the congressional "supercommittee" collapsed last fall - a devastating package of tax hikes and spending cuts that experts say will blow up our fragile economic recovery and drag us back into recession next year.
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