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Opening Act

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NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Loretta Holloway is on the move. The slim, elegant vocalist owns homes in both Atlantic City and Las Vegas, which makes life on the road a lot easier. With such real estate holdings, Holloway is obviously earning a decent living, even though she has not yet slipped into the household-name bracket. Among the reasons for this is that a lot of the top names in the business like having Holloway as their opening act. Currently, Holloway is holding down that spot for impressionist Rich Little through this weekend at Caesars Hotel-Casino.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Opening acts often get no respect in this town. People walk in on them late, talk during their sets and sometimes even get nasty with the poor musicians, just 'cause the headline artist they've paid to see hasn't taken the stage as yet. I'll never forget Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band being booed in 1973 by a Spectrum crowd who only wanted to see Chicago. Cretins. And they were hardly the only soon-to-be-important artists snubbed in South Philadelphia, land of the boo-birds.
NEWS
July 28, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ANDY NELSON
David Bowie threw a barbecue to talk about music yesterday at Veterans Stadium - the music he'll make Thursday and Friday in concerts opening the North American phase of his "Glass Spider Tour. " Already, workers had begun building the show's elaborate stage, which takes four days to complete. The tour's "logistics are horrendous," Bowie said, and the production costs a "basic" $10 million and counting. Bowie, whose opening act will be Philadelphia's Tommy Conwell and the Young Rumblers, has had a long association with the area, dating back to 1974, when he recorded two albums here.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2008 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
In January, Sharon Little was waiting on tables in Ardmore and West Chester and singing in coffee shops like Ardmore's MilkBoy, with a self-released CD and an EP to her name. On Saturday night, she will be opening for Robert Plant and Alison Krauss at the Mann Center for Performing Arts, one of her 34 dates on their stellar "Raising Sand" tour. It's been a rapid trajectory this year for the 28-year-old, but Little's no overnight sensation. She's been singing - jazz, blues, pop - since she was 16, and her unwavering goal has been to "Follow That Sound," as she declares on the opening track of her CBS debut, Perfect Time For A Breakdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1990 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he last appeared in Atlantic City, it wasn't Garry Shandling's show. That was about four years ago, when Shandling was an opening act for Joan Rivers. Now he's back in town, and at last, "it's Garry Shandling's show" - this time, he's the headliner. Since that last appearance at the shore - at a time when he was regarded as a highly promising comedian - Shandling has produced and starred in two specials for Showtime, and landed It's Garry Shandling's Show as a weekly series for several years on the Fox network.
NEWS
May 22, 2011
Bill Skiles, 79, the wacky half of the Skiles and Henderson comedy duo, who entertained audiences for five decades with his sound effects, mimicry, and improvised musical instruments, died Monday at home in St. Cloud, Fla. The cause was kidney cancer, said his wife, Arlene. Mr. Skiles and Pete Henderson began their collaboration in Orange County, Calif., where they grew up. Starting as an act at Disneyland in the late 1950s, they worked their way up to Las Vegas showrooms, national television, and touring as the opening act for the Carpenters and the New Christy Minstrels.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The way comedian Sammy Shore sees it, he's the "number-one number two. " That's Sammy Shore's way of saying: Sure, he's basically an opening act and probably always will be, but when it comes to opening acts, he's at the top. This weekend, Shore is opening for Julio Iglesias at Resorts International Casino Hotel. "I've worked with them all," Shore said during a telephone interview. "All of them. " Shore has no illusions about how the audience regards him. " I know they come to see Julio, not me," he said.
NEWS
May 4, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Until Friday's Electric Factory show, the hype surrounding Lady Gaga seemed too good to be true. Lada Gaga's 2008 debut, The Fame, offered a mirthful mix of theatrical electronic disco and grand glam pop filled with snitty, pithy lyrics and coy vocals rich in cold soul. While Gaga, born Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta, had her hands in Fame's production, playing and songwriting, she's also a fashion maven with an eye toward wearing asymmetrical '80s tops, bodysuits instead of pants, and complementing her ensembles with an eyewear selection of disco-ball masks and TV-screen sunglasses.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For all the talk of New England singer/songwriter Ray LaMontagne's folksy craft and winsome ways, in 2014 the gentle beardo with the raspy voice and nicely rhapsodic vibes has added dramatic psychedelia to his mix. At first, LaMontagne's dip into hallucinogenic waters could only be found on his new album, Supernova , produced by Black Keys' Dan Auerbach. But with Saturday's show at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center, LaMontagne proved he was taking Supernova 's tip and moving toward trippy Timothy Leary-inspired sights and sounds to go with his heartfelt emotionalism - an electric Kool-Aid acid test with maple syrup replacing the psilocybin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For all the talk of New England singer/songwriter Ray LaMontagne's folksy craft and winsome ways, in 2014 the gentle beardo with the raspy voice and nicely rhapsodic vibes has added dramatic psychedelia to his mix. At first, LaMontagne's dip into hallucinogenic waters could only be found on his new album, Supernova , produced by Black Keys' Dan Auerbach. But with Saturday's show at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center, LaMontagne proved he was taking Supernova 's tip and moving toward trippy Timothy Leary-inspired sights and sounds to go with his heartfelt emotionalism - an electric Kool-Aid acid test with maple syrup replacing the psilocybin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Of all musical birthdays worth celebrating (there aren't as many as you've been led to believe), one particularly quirky event has warm local value: the 20th anniversary of G. Love and Special Sauce's first album. South Street busker Garrett "G. Love" Dutton - laid-back singer, guitarist, harmonicist - hooked up with out-of-towners Jeff Clemens (drums) and Jim Prescott (upright bass) for a then-unique trio based as much in hucklebucking folk and blues as it was in hip-hop. The group's sloppy, tangy tones quickly found their way to Okeh/Epic, and their eponymous album dropped in 1994, influencing the like-minded relaxed-fit Jack Johnson, whose success sadly surpassed theirs but led to a friendship and contract with his record label.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi and FOR THE INQUIRER
If alternative hip hop ever went looking for heroes, it could have thrown a rock and hit two of them on Saturday night when producer/rapper EL-P and MC Killer Mike packed the Trocadero. Not to be confused with progressive-rock elders ELP (Emerson Lake and Palmer), the Brooklyn-raised Jaime Meline has been making noncommercial, noisily low-fidelity music with harsh lyrics since the 1990s with his Company Flow trio. After going solo, he put his money where his mouth was in the early 2000s when he started the Def Jux label and released equally adventurous offerings such as Aesop Rock and Philly's RJD2.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
With Mayor Nutter as his opening act, hip-hop mogul and rapper Jay-Z stood atop the Philadelphia Museum of Art steps. His theme: Made in America, the music festival - announced Monday morning - that will take over the Benjamin Franklin Parkway on Labor Day weekend. Jay-Z, whose given name is Shawn Carter, was saying he embarks on a venture only if it has potential to be great. Just then, a fan shouted, "You're the best, Hov!", a shortening of "Jayhova," one of the MC's noms de rap. Without missing a beat, Jay-Z answered back: "I agree.
SPORTS
January 13, 2012 | by Vegas Vic, gabrielk@phillynews.com
Saints (-3) over 49ERS: Give Jim Harbaugh credit for taking San Francisco from 6-10 to 13-3 in his first season. But sit down while we put the Niners season under the microscope. They won the NFC West, the worst division in the NFL. Big Deal! Beating the Rams, Seahawks and Cardinals is not impressing me. OK, the 49ers have a solid running game, an OK quarterback in Alex Smith, and a very, very good defense. Lemme go back to the QB slot. Smith has had big problems in three games against New Orleans.
NEWS
May 22, 2011
Bill Skiles, 79, the wacky half of the Skiles and Henderson comedy duo, who entertained audiences for five decades with his sound effects, mimicry, and improvised musical instruments, died Monday at home in St. Cloud, Fla. The cause was kidney cancer, said his wife, Arlene. Mr. Skiles and Pete Henderson began their collaboration in Orange County, Calif., where they grew up. Starting as an act at Disneyland in the late 1950s, they worked their way up to Las Vegas showrooms, national television, and touring as the opening act for the Carpenters and the New Christy Minstrels.
NEWS
May 15, 2010 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Every two years about this time, the 203 seats of the state House of Representatives and half the 50 Senate seats are on the ballot. But beyond that, this is not your typical legislative primary election. Races will play out Tuesday as an opening act for the fall elections, when contests will determine control of the House - and perhaps which party holds the upper hand in the once-a-decade redistricting process. Democrats and Republicans will be vying for that control even as both parties have been humbled and hobbled by corruption scandals.
NEWS
March 8, 2010 | By AinĀ Doley FOR THE INQUIRER
Just before showtime, The Beat (100.3 FM) tweeted that Saturday's Omarion show with special guest Marques Houston at the TLA had been sold out, and the predominantly female crowd chanted "Marques! Marques! Marques!" as the former member of the R&B boy band Immature hit the stage. Houston hung around the edge of the stage crooning just four songs while offering sneak peaks at his abs during his 20-minute set. Full of raunchy posturing and dedications to "all the freaks out there," his onstage persona was like bad soap-opera acting.
NEWS
May 4, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Until Friday's Electric Factory show, the hype surrounding Lady Gaga seemed too good to be true. Lada Gaga's 2008 debut, The Fame, offered a mirthful mix of theatrical electronic disco and grand glam pop filled with snitty, pithy lyrics and coy vocals rich in cold soul. While Gaga, born Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta, had her hands in Fame's production, playing and songwriting, she's also a fashion maven with an eye toward wearing asymmetrical '80s tops, bodysuits instead of pants, and complementing her ensembles with an eyewear selection of disco-ball masks and TV-screen sunglasses.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2008 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
In January, Sharon Little was waiting on tables in Ardmore and West Chester and singing in coffee shops like Ardmore's MilkBoy, with a self-released CD and an EP to her name. On Saturday night, she will be opening for Robert Plant and Alison Krauss at the Mann Center for Performing Arts, one of her 34 dates on their stellar "Raising Sand" tour. It's been a rapid trajectory this year for the 28-year-old, but Little's no overnight sensation. She's been singing - jazz, blues, pop - since she was 16, and her unwavering goal has been to "Follow That Sound," as she declares on the opening track of her CBS debut, Perfect Time For A Breakdown.
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