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Opening Doors

NEWS
October 25, 1990 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
A Bucks County judge has overturned a decision last year by the New Britain Township Zoning Hearing Board that blocked a controversial drug-and-alcohol rehabilitation facility in the township. Judge Michael J. Kane said Friday that the township must grant Gerald Schatz a special exception to lease a 17.8-acre site at Old Iron Hill and Ferry Roads for the facility. The property, which abuts Doylestown Township, is zoned for institutional use. Schatz, a Fort Washington resident, has planned to lease the property to Recovery Centers of America Inc. for a treatment center for adolescents.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | By Daniel R. Biddle and Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writers
In a Harrisburg courthouse, a two-inch-thick stack of documents in a manila folder marked Larsen v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania tells the story - much of it, anyway - of the second secret investigation of state Supreme Court Justice Rolf Larsen, the most controversial member of the state's most powerful court. It is a Byzantine tale of angry words flying back and forth in secret hearings; of a strange telephone call to a prosecution witness; of an inquiry tied in knots and delayed for months by Larsen's legal challenges, and broadened by new and potentially damaging evidence from a judge whom Larsen had initially hoped to call as a friendly witness.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Ann Marie Escher, Special to The Inquirer
An East Fallowfield man will be able to put up a storage shed at the rear of his property, the township zoning board has ruled. The shed will have a frontage on the east side of Doe Run Road, across from South Brandywine Junior High. The man, Joseph Mammarella, was granted a zoning variance Wednesday to construct the 14-by-20-foot shed four feet from his rear property line. The zoning ordinance requires a setback of 15 feet. The board ruled in Mammarella's favor because he wants to build the shed beside an existing garage in the southeast corner of his property.
NEWS
July 7, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Thanks to advances in high-tech wizardry, audio recordings long considered "irretrievably" damaged are rising from the dead, reborn in an amazingly pristine, full-fidelity fashion. A case in point is the never-before-seen filmed performance of "The Doors: Live at the Hollywood Bowl," set for July 16 release by MCA Home Video on VHS Hi-Fi and Beta Hi-Fi tape at $24.95. A riveting piece of music history, this 65-minute tape captures America's darkest, most dramatic progressive rock band of the 1960s in prime form, working through classics such as "When the Music's Over," "Alabama Song" (a.k.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
After six closed sessions, Gloucester County's government study panel opened one of its meetings to the public last night - and members got an earful. "Why are you afraid to open your meetings?" asked Richard A. Dann, president of the Communications Workers of America Local 1085 that represents 1,000 county workers. "Is there anything so sensitive or confidential about the panel's deliberations that the public should not be allowed to see and hear it firsthand? I believe not," Dann said.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Michael Fay, Special to The Inquirer
The doors of Aldan's new municipal building are now open to the public, but council President John D. Bellopede is not altogether pleased. Bellopede last week told the first Aldan Borough Council meeting to be held in the building that he discovered the front door unlocked while the building was vacant at 5:05 p.m. on Jan. 28. . He suggested at Wednesday night's council caucus meeting that a letter be drafted and sent out to those who hold...
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Helen Walker closed the door on the cramped motel room in Cinnaminson yesterday morning and walked away from a life she didn't think she'd miss. No more nights of sleeping on the floor so that her four children could share the two beds. No more days in the drab room with worn, flowered bedspreads and a view of the parking lot - a room with no stove, no air conditioner, and no place for the children to play. But Walker was also a little bit afraid. Under a new state plan to house the homeless, she was moving to a cottage on the grounds of Ancora State Psychiatric Hospital in Winslow Township.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
Republic Bank, the city's newest, opened for business yesterday at its only office, at 1515 Market St. The state-chartered bank is capitalized at $5.6 million. It is a member of the MAC network of automated-teller machines, as well as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the Federal Reserve. Rolf A. Stensrud, the bank's president, joined Chamber of Commerce officials, legislators and city representatives at opening ceremonies.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
As she wandered around her back yard over the weekend, 8-year-old SaraJoyce Galloway seemed like any other little girl. Dressed in a light-pink snow jacket and black boots, she watched as about 20 workers hammered and drilled and sawed in a noisy chorus of Christmastide. But SaraJoyce is not like any other little girl in Bridgeton Township, a rural Bucks County community on the Delaware River. And the workers were anything but ordinary. True, they were skilled tradesmen - carpenters, painters, electricians, plumbers.
NEWS
August 11, 2002 | By Jeff Speck
I have never been to your Levittown, but somehow I feel qualified to write about it. The truth is that I don't need to visit. I've been to other Levittowns, and you bought yours off the same lot. That doesn't mean it's a bad product, only that it is mass produced and lacking uniqueness. What really matters is how well it runs, and yours runs pretty well. In terms of quality of life - what really matters - Levittown is strides ahead of its modern-day competitors. It is a sad and remarkable fact that few communities built today serve their residents as well as Levittown does.
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