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Opening Doors

NEWS
December 10, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
As she wandered around her back yard over the weekend, 8-year-old SaraJoyce Galloway seemed like any other little girl. Dressed in a light-pink snow jacket and black boots, she watched as about 20 workers hammered and drilled and sawed in a noisy chorus of Christmastide. But SaraJoyce is not like any other little girl in Bridgeton Township, a rural Bucks County community on the Delaware River. And the workers were anything but ordinary. True, they were skilled tradesmen - carpenters, painters, electricians, plumbers.
NEWS
August 11, 2002 | By Jeff Speck
I have never been to your Levittown, but somehow I feel qualified to write about it. The truth is that I don't need to visit. I've been to other Levittowns, and you bought yours off the same lot. That doesn't mean it's a bad product, only that it is mass produced and lacking uniqueness. What really matters is how well it runs, and yours runs pretty well. In terms of quality of life - what really matters - Levittown is strides ahead of its modern-day competitors. It is a sad and remarkable fact that few communities built today serve their residents as well as Levittown does.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | BY ALLEN M. HORNBLUM
During the Goode and Rendell administrations, Philadelphia has steered a gradual but steady course toward privatization of its prisons. Presumably to save taxpayers money, the prisons went private with food and health-care concessions. The latest step, but arguably the most significant yet - is exporting prisoners to Delaware County, a penal system run by a private for-profit company. Philadelphia's beleaguered jails are already overcrowded, thereby necessitating exportation of prisoners to other Pennsylvania prisons with cells to rent.
NEWS
August 2, 1986 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
Just over a week ago, I was in San Francisco atop a 22-story building that was under construction. Earlier in the day, I watched a number of hardhats using a crane to lift heavy sections of concrete which formed the building's "skin. " The building is called The Portman and is just across from The Donatello, one of America's great hotels. Fascinated, I watched the workers and discovered in myself a strong desire to join in, or at least to examine the frame they had constructed.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Andy Hackstaff is eagerly looking forward to the day when he can work at a real job and bring home a paycheck for his efforts. The 24-year-old, who has cerebral palsy and mild retardation, spends his days in the adult day-care center at Brian's House Enterprises - the newest facility of Brian's House Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides services to people with developmental and/or physical disabilities. The center opened in early December but will hold its official grand opening tomorrow.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | Daily News Staff Report
OK, kids, so you can't shoot a rubber band farther than the 99 feet that Leo Clouser shot one in Wyomissing in 1999. And you can't grow a pumpkin heavier than the one Gerry Checkon grew in Altoona that weighed 1,131 pounds. And your shoes aren't bigger than the 28.5 size worn by Matthew McGrory. Don't despair. You, too, can get into the "Guinness Book of World Records. " All you have to do is join in on the creation of a 25-by-32-foot logo for the X Games, coming here Aug. 17-22, using Lego blocks.
NEWS
August 12, 2010 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Reviewing the news from the last two weeks during which I was enjoying a Cape Cod vacation, I've been gripped by the story of 10 medical aid workers murdered last week in Afghanistan. This human tragedy provides some insights that may surprise you about the prospects for progress in the Afghan war. The aid team, six of whom were Americans, was attacked while returning from an arduous trip to a remote area of northeastern Afghanistan where they provided medical services to Afghan villagers.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
BAD NEWS for Pennsylvania: The payday-lending industry, which we warned early this spring was making a return to the halls of Harrisburg, trying to gain entry into the state and thus the bank accounts of residents, is making progress. Predatory loans - characterized by high fees and interest rates, as well as a tendency for lenders to ensure repayment by gaining access to a borrower's bank account, rather than considering his ability to repay - are not currently allowed in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 30, 2008
Using an outrageous loophole in state law, many wealthy New Jersey communities have for years avoided providing more affordable housing by paying off poorer towns to shoulder the responsibility. The practice has shamefully made New Jersey one of the most economically segregated states in the country, with high concentrations of poverty in its urban centers. Thankfully, the Legislature took a step toward changing that last week by approving an overhaul of New Jersey's housing policies.
SPORTS
August 21, 1987 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, Daily News Sports Writer
The International Olympic Committee is considering a proposal that would open the Olympics to all competitors, including professionals, by the 1992 Games in Barcelona, Spain. Such an action conceivably would make NBA players available to the United States for international basketball competitions such as the Olympics and the Pan American Games. But before you get carried away by the thought of Larry Bird, Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan laying waste to the Soviet Union and Cuba, be advised that the United States Basketball Federation is opposed to the inclusion of pros on national teams.
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