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NEWS
August 16, 1997 | By Derrick DePledge, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
You're stuck in your car on a Friday afternoon. It's 98 degrees. Your head is splitting. And the only thing separating you from a cold one and the living-room couch is an approaching freight train. Run it, man. Experts believe that drivers who succumb to temptation and try to defy a train are responsible for more than half of rail-crossing accidents. Last year, trains collided with vehicles or pedestrians 4,257 times, down from 4,633 the year before. Temptation urges drivers to try to beat the odds.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They put up fences; they put up "danger" and "no-trespassing" signs; they run print and broadcast public service announcements, and take the message into schools and other youth and community groups. But railroads and the agencies that regulate them say they can't keep people off the tracks. The three teenagers killed Sunday by an Amtrak Acela train going 100 m.p.h. lived in Morrisville, Bucks County. Within the last year, Amtrak had presented a program called "Operation Lifesaver" in the Morrisville public schools.
NEWS
December 12, 2002 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A pedestrian who authorities said was trespassing on railroad tracks near the Delaware border was struck and killed yesterday by a train heading to New York. Passengers were delayed at the scene of the accident for about 90 minutes, and about 10 trains throughout Amtrak's Northeast Corridor experienced delays, rail officials said. Amtrak spokesman Dan Stessel said the victim was hit at 2:48 p.m. by an Acela train from Washington. Stessel said the accident did not occur at a grade crossing.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | BY ANGELO FICHERA, Daily News Staff Writer fichera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5913
A20-YEAR-OLD man who was struck and killed by a Regional Rail train Thursday was the fifth person to die on SEPTA tracks this year. Emmanuel Henderson, of Ardsley, Montgomery County, was trying to cross the fence separating the east and west tracks near the North Hills station in Glenside about 6:15 p.m., when he was struck, police said. At the time, an eastbound train was stopped at the station, said Abington Police Deputy Chief John Livingood, which prevented Henderson from successfully entering the east tracks.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trains struck and killed 28 pedestrians in Pennsylvania last year, an increase of 22 percent over the number of such deaths in 2011. Nearly half the deaths occurred on SEPTA's tracks. Last year, SEPTA trains killed 12 people, up from 11 in 2011 and six each in 2010 and 2009. Last month, a rash of train-related accidents and suicides prompted State Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Bucks-Montgomery) to urge SEPTA officials to do more to prevent such fatalities, even if it meant reduced speeds or lost revenue.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trains struck and killed 28 pedestrians in Pennsylvania last year, an increase of 22 percent over the number of such deaths in 2011. Nearly half the deaths occurred on SEPTA's tracks. Last year, SEPTA trains killed 12 people, up from 11 in 2011 and six each in 2010 and 2009. Last month, a rash of train-related accidents and suicides prompted State Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Bucks-Montgomery) to urge SEPTA officials to do more to prevent such fatalities, even if it meant reduced speeds or lost revenue.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 1996 U.S. Department of Transportation report on them was titled simply: "Accidents That Shouldn't Happen. " The thrust: With proper education of motorists and good warning signals, crashes of motor vehicles and trains at railroad grade crossings could be virtually eliminated. And, in fact, a concerted campaign by the government and the rail industry in the last decade has helped reduce sharply the number of fatal grade-crossing accidents. Yet across the country, particularly in rural areas, grinding crashes such as the one Monday night in Illinois of an Amtrak passenger train and a semitrailer truck remain common and deadly, although, in the vast majority of cases, the victims are not on the trains but in front of them.
NEWS
December 23, 2001
Railroad tracks have always had a certain attraction for children, perhaps because they smack of forbidden adventure. No one really knows what drew three teenagers from Morrisville to walk on the railroad tracks used by the super-fast and super-quiet Amtrak Acela train Dec. 9, in Bucks County's Falls Township. Tragically, the three teens were killed that Sunday when a train hit them. Death seems no deterrent: A day later, children could be seen taking short cuts across the tracks.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | By Rich Henson and Margie Fishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The deaths last week of two pedestrians struck by trains while crossing railroad tracks have prompted SEPTA officials to renew their call for train safety. "We need to convince people not to cross railroad tracks," a SEPTA spokesman, Richard Maloney, said. "It is a point that we drive home over and over and over. "Any time there is a tragedy, it sends shudders through the entire community," he said. "Each of these incidents we view as a personal tragedy. " On Thursday, 21-year-old Monica Young was hit by a SEPTA R5 commuter train as she crossed the tracks along Butler Pike in Ambler, next to SEPTA's Ambler Station.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK & STEPHANIE FARR, skowrom@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
SEPTA officials may consider additional security options after an 11-year-old boy was killed when he decided to climb onto a parked train Saturday night in Germantown. Jewels Angelo, of Albanus Street in Olney, was electrocuted by 11,000 volts when he grabbed an electrified mechanism atop a train about 6:55 p.m. at the Wayne Electric Shop, near Stenton Avenue and Berkley Street, a SEPTA spokesman said. Jaime Tucker, Angelo's stepmother, said yesterday that her son and another boy, 12, who was a family friend wandered off Saturday night while the two families were at a nearby block party on Elwood Street.
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NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trains struck and killed 28 pedestrians in Pennsylvania last year, an increase of 22 percent over the number of such deaths in 2011. Nearly half the deaths occurred on SEPTA's tracks. Last year, SEPTA trains killed 12 people, up from 11 in 2011 and six each in 2010 and 2009. Last month, a rash of train-related accidents and suicides prompted State Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Bucks-Montgomery) to urge SEPTA officials to do more to prevent such fatalities, even if it meant reduced speeds or lost revenue.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trains struck and killed 28 pedestrians in Pennsylvania last year, an increase of 22 percent over the number of such deaths in 2011. Nearly half the deaths occurred on SEPTA's tracks. Last year, SEPTA trains killed 12 people, up from 11 in 2011 and six each in 2010 and 2009. Last month, a rash of train-related accidents and suicides prompted State Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Bucks-Montgomery) to urge SEPTA officials to do more to prevent such fatalities, even if it meant reduced speeds or lost revenue.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | BY ANGELO FICHERA, Daily News Staff Writer fichera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5913
A20-YEAR-OLD man who was struck and killed by a Regional Rail train Thursday was the fifth person to die on SEPTA tracks this year. Emmanuel Henderson, of Ardsley, Montgomery County, was trying to cross the fence separating the east and west tracks near the North Hills station in Glenside about 6:15 p.m., when he was struck, police said. At the time, an eastbound train was stopped at the station, said Abington Police Deputy Chief John Livingood, which prevented Henderson from successfully entering the east tracks.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK & STEPHANIE FARR, skowrom@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
SEPTA officials may consider additional security options after an 11-year-old boy was killed when he decided to climb onto a parked train Saturday night in Germantown. Jewels Angelo, of Albanus Street in Olney, was electrocuted by 11,000 volts when he grabbed an electrified mechanism atop a train about 6:55 p.m. at the Wayne Electric Shop, near Stenton Avenue and Berkley Street, a SEPTA spokesman said. Jaime Tucker, Angelo's stepmother, said yesterday that her son and another boy, 12, who was a family friend wandered off Saturday night while the two families were at a nearby block party on Elwood Street.
NEWS
December 12, 2002 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A pedestrian who authorities said was trespassing on railroad tracks near the Delaware border was struck and killed yesterday by a train heading to New York. Passengers were delayed at the scene of the accident for about 90 minutes, and about 10 trains throughout Amtrak's Northeast Corridor experienced delays, rail officials said. Amtrak spokesman Dan Stessel said the victim was hit at 2:48 p.m. by an Acela train from Washington. Stessel said the accident did not occur at a grade crossing.
NEWS
December 23, 2001
Railroad tracks have always had a certain attraction for children, perhaps because they smack of forbidden adventure. No one really knows what drew three teenagers from Morrisville to walk on the railroad tracks used by the super-fast and super-quiet Amtrak Acela train Dec. 9, in Bucks County's Falls Township. Tragically, the three teens were killed that Sunday when a train hit them. Death seems no deterrent: A day later, children could be seen taking short cuts across the tracks.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They put up fences; they put up "danger" and "no-trespassing" signs; they run print and broadcast public service announcements, and take the message into schools and other youth and community groups. But railroads and the agencies that regulate them say they can't keep people off the tracks. The three teenagers killed Sunday by an Amtrak Acela train going 100 m.p.h. lived in Morrisville, Bucks County. Within the last year, Amtrak had presented a program called "Operation Lifesaver" in the Morrisville public schools.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | By Rich Henson and Margie Fishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The deaths last week of two pedestrians struck by trains while crossing railroad tracks have prompted SEPTA officials to renew their call for train safety. "We need to convince people not to cross railroad tracks," a SEPTA spokesman, Richard Maloney, said. "It is a point that we drive home over and over and over. "Any time there is a tragedy, it sends shudders through the entire community," he said. "Each of these incidents we view as a personal tragedy. " On Thursday, 21-year-old Monica Young was hit by a SEPTA R5 commuter train as she crossed the tracks along Butler Pike in Ambler, next to SEPTA's Ambler Station.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 1996 U.S. Department of Transportation report on them was titled simply: "Accidents That Shouldn't Happen. " The thrust: With proper education of motorists and good warning signals, crashes of motor vehicles and trains at railroad grade crossings could be virtually eliminated. And, in fact, a concerted campaign by the government and the rail industry in the last decade has helped reduce sharply the number of fatal grade-crossing accidents. Yet across the country, particularly in rural areas, grinding crashes such as the one Monday night in Illinois of an Amtrak passenger train and a semitrailer truck remain common and deadly, although, in the vast majority of cases, the victims are not on the trains but in front of them.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | By Derrick DePledge, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
You're stuck in your car on a Friday afternoon. It's 98 degrees. Your head is splitting. And the only thing separating you from a cold one and the living-room couch is an approaching freight train. Run it, man. Experts believe that drivers who succumb to temptation and try to defy a train are responsible for more than half of rail-crossing accidents. Last year, trains collided with vehicles or pedestrians 4,257 times, down from 4,633 the year before. Temptation urges drivers to try to beat the odds.
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