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Opportunities

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NEWS
May 6, 1988 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Spencer Gale Dennis Jr. has said that if his life had a theme, it was never letting an opportunity for advancement slip by. "Opportunities were made available to me," he told a reporter five years ago, "and I think because of that - because I knew that opportunities had not been afforded in the past to the extent that I was a beneficiary of - that I really should not waste them. " Born in an era of segregation, the first black man to serve as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania has made the most of opportunities in his 43 years - rising from boyhood in race-conscious Dover, Del., to the Merchant Marine Academy to the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania to chief of the Justice Department's narcotics and dangerous drug section in Washington, to the high-profile U.S. attorney's post in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 6, 1986 | By Ian L. McHarg
Philadelphians enjoy a rich inheritance. Their forebears chose a wonderful site for a city and built well. Independence and Carpenters Halls, the First and Second Banks, City Hall, the Museum of Art and the Parkway are only a few conspicious treasures, but one simple title embraces the largest single inheritance of all - Fairmount Park. The largest urban park in the world is also the finest. Its structure permeates much of the city and confers beauty and delight. The Cresheim and Wissahickon, Pennypack and Schuylkill, riparian lands and enclosing wooded slopes provide the skeleton.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Tchaikovsky wrote 10 operas but most American houses stage only a couple, including The Queen of Spades and Eugene Onegin (and even these, it seems to me, aren't performed often enough). Eugene Onegin is always special to encounter, as Tchaikovsky's music so sensitively elaborates the characters in Pushkin's love story (a poem actually) of tragically lost opportunities. Rising young Canadian baritone Gino Quilico, son of the baritone Louis Quilico, is expected to make a dashing title character in tonight's production of Eugene Onegin by the Opera Company of Philadelphia at the Academy of Music.
NEWS
January 24, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Prince John: Mother! He has a knife! Eleanor of Aquitaine: Of course he has a knife. I have a knife. We all have knives. It's 1183 and we are barbarians. And what witty barbarians they are, this ridiculously dysfunctional royal family struggling for power and land, betraying, fornicating, murdering, double-dealing, and slinging out one-liners all the while in The Lion in Winter. Eleanor was the richest woman in the world when she married Henry II, and he has, in the 30 years since then, become "the greatest power in a thousand years.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | BY JULIET C. WELKER
Jim, a successful 30-something male attorney, is divorced, rents a two- bedroom apartment in the 'burbs, and spends about an hour and a half each day commuting to Center City. "Jim," I said. "You must buy a home in the city this year! Both prices and interest rates are way down. " "But," he replied, "look at Donald Trump's problems because he bought real estate. " I hadn't realized that Trump's get-rich-quick deals with junk bonds and the S&Ls lining the pockets of the good ol' boys' real estate scams could obscure people's understanding of today's legitimate real estate opportunities.
NEWS
July 17, 1989
Let's not get into a swivet over whether Harold J. Katz wants to move our basketball team to New Jersey. Even Katz is smart enough to realize that the 76ers' lease with Spectacor, the firm that manages the Spectrum, runs through 1999. If Katz wants to break that lease, it would cost him about 1.5 million smackers, every year. The guy's not stupid. Katz isn't the issue we should be thinking about. Nor should we be thinking only about what to do with the reportedly unsafe John F. Kennedy Stadium.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | By William Raspberry
Someone once told me about a farmer who was hurrying home during a flash flood and, because he wasn't sure what to do, decided to ride his horse right through the rushing creek bordering his farm. Well, the situation was worse than the farmer thought, and the result was horse and rider were swept downstream, both nearly drowning before they managed to clamber to safety. After that, I was told, the farmer couldn't induce that horse to cross the creek even when the flow was a mere trickle.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louis Malone couldn't stop smiling about the opportunity his Marlton advertising firm sees in jumping onto the economic juggernaut known as the Republican National Convention. "It would be very influential for us to do business for anyone that's coming to the convention," said Malone, vice president for business development for Adventures in Advertising, which can create items such as banners, buttons, logos and T-shirts. "There are opportunities for all of us. " Yesterday, two top officials from Philadelphia 2000, the host and organizational arm of the convention, touted the GOP shindig to more than 100 business leaders here at a breakfast meeting sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Southern New Jersey.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The pay is decent and the title is nice. But the work involved, by almost every comparison that can be made among jobs in state government, isn't exactly exciting. So why are six people, including two respected state senators with a combined 38 years of legislative experience, seeking to capture the Democratic and Republican nominations for state auditor general in the April 28 primary? The opportunities, the candidates say. Opportunities to improve Pennsylvania's fiscal management, shape public policy, safeguard the taxpayers' dollars and leave a mark on the commonwealth.
SPORTS
November 24, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pittsburgh Steelers are a tough bunch that plays football on the muscular, visceral level. They're also almost universally picked to wind up in the AFC playoffs this season. So neither Steelers coach Bill Cowher nor any of his players could explain exactly what went wrong yesterday at Veterans Stadium, where the Eagles looked like the playoff-bound club and the Steelers a team that had simply lost its way. "It was a game of mistakes and missed opportunities," said Cowher, wincing at the impact of five turnovers by his offense and no takeaways by his defense.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
After President Obama on Dec. 17 called for restoring "travel, commerce, and the flow of information" to communist Cuba, island-watchers at Penn's Wharton School rushed to gather Cuban American magnates, scholars, and U.S. officials to brainstorm investors' return. They met in New York on Thursday for an all-day Cuba Opportunity Summit. Cuba is roughly as big and populous as Pennsylvania. Better beaches too. The two were linked from the 1700s to the 1960s by common interests in tobacco, sugar, chocolate, and medical products.
SPORTS
April 2, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
NEW YORK - Temple had a chance to make a statement on Madison Square Garden's fabled hardwood Tuesday night. The Owls had an opportunity to prove they could beat a team from the most prestigious conference in college basketball. So what did coach Fran Dunphy's Owls do with their big shot? They missed it. The Owls, in fact, missed over and over and over again during the second half of a 60-57 NIT semifinal loss to Miami that ended their season. Temple could have and even should have beaten a Miami team that earlier this season pinned a 16-point loss on Duke with all the Cameron Crazies watching on the Blue Devils' home court.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
As Philadelphia faces its once-in-15-years franchise renewal talks with Comcast, you may be worried that city officials are just a little too cozy with Philly's 1st Corporate Citizen - a reasonable concern after I reported last week that the mayor's office has been sitting on a report likely to embarrass the company. Well, here's one more reason to fret. Just as complaints about Comcast's customer-service flubs were boiling over publicly this winter, the company quietly won certification from the Federal Communications Commission that all four of its Philadelphia franchises were subject to "effective competition.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mysterious benefactor swoops in with a well-timed offer of assistance that, over time, has life-changing consequences. It's a scenario that has long been a staple of literature and mythology, but does it happen in real life? JoAnne Epps is confident it does. Epps is dean of Temple University Law School, and she has no doubt that but for a chance visit by a young Trinity College student years ago, when she was a senior at Cheltenham High School, her life would have gone in a different direction.
SPORTS
March 6, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Flyers have been outshooting and getting better chances than opponents recently, but their inability to finish the scoring opportunities is a major reason they are still five points behind Boston for the Eastern Conference's final playoff spot. The Flyers have left some critical points on the table, and they are in virtual must-win situations Thursday against powerful St. Louis at the Wells Fargo Center and Saturday afternoon in Boston, which has two games in hand. In their last five losses - to Columbus, Buffalo, Carolina, Toronto, and Calgary - the Flyers have had a lopsided shots advantage in four of the games.
SPORTS
March 3, 2015 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - A little more than 5 years ago, Andy Oliver was climbing onto the mound at Turner Field to make his major league debut against a Braves lineup that featured Chipper Jones, Jason Heyward and Brian McCann. He was 22 years old, barely a year removed from college, one of the top prospects in the Tigers' organization. Yesterday, Oliver was climbing onto the mound at Bright House Field to make his Phillies debut against a Division II lineup that featured a bunch of guys who won't get drafted next year.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Starnes Walker was a newly minted physicist and Navy electronic-weapons veteran in the 1970s, his job at Phillips Petroleum Corp. included finding ways to replace human oil-refinery operators, who once hand-checked miles of pipes, with digitally networked monitors and switches. "So that, now, valves are controlled by computers," Walker says, from his office in a converted Chrysler factory, where he heads the University of Delaware's new Cybersecurity Initiative. That digital technology had far-reaching results: It's part of the reason the brightly lit refineries that still line the rivers near Houston and Philadelphia now employ hundreds of workers each, not thousands.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Kat Mittman Kobak planned to design jewelry for this year's Grammy Awards attendees by personalizing her signature silver, sparkling, beaded choker. But then, three days before the pieces were to be shipped off, Kobak's publicist got the names of exactly who would be getting Kat Designs baubles: Taylor Swift, Jennifer Hudson, Miranda Lambert, and John Mayer. The dainty necklaces with edgy panther and arrowhead charms weren't quite right anymore - especially now that Mayer was in the mix. Kobak would have to start from scratch.
SPORTS
February 4, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
IT IS HERE - the calm after the storm, the teapot without a tempest. Sunday's Super Bowl was one of the more exciting ever, with New England beating Seattle, 28-24. Still, just moments after Seahawks coach Pete Carroll made the worst decision in Super Bowl history, the thought that crossed my mind was - OK, what now? The NFL is done. The Sixers and Flyers are both having seasons that yield little optimism. The Phillies are still 2 weeks away from pitchers and catchers reporting to Clearwater, and frankly, considering the last-place projections for them, who much cares?
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - At Gov. Wolf's inaugural last month, new House Majority Leader Dave Reed was among those seated in the A-list section outside the Capitol. After the ceremony, a state official turned to Reed, looking for a program. Reed told him he did not know where there was an extra one. The official, whom Reed declined to name, responded by saying, "If you want your boss, the governor, to be successful, you'd better know where the programs are. " Without missing a beat, Reed replied, "My apologies, sir. " It happens that way for Reed - a lot. At 36, he more closely resembles the star athlete who just got named president of his college fraternity than a six-term lawmaker just elected leader of the Republican House majority in the nation's sixth most populous state.
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