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Opportunities

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NEWS
May 6, 1988 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Spencer Gale Dennis Jr. has said that if his life had a theme, it was never letting an opportunity for advancement slip by. "Opportunities were made available to me," he told a reporter five years ago, "and I think because of that - because I knew that opportunities had not been afforded in the past to the extent that I was a beneficiary of - that I really should not waste them. " Born in an era of segregation, the first black man to serve as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania has made the most of opportunities in his 43 years - rising from boyhood in race-conscious Dover, Del., to the Merchant Marine Academy to the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania to chief of the Justice Department's narcotics and dangerous drug section in Washington, to the high-profile U.S. attorney's post in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 6, 1986 | By Ian L. McHarg
Philadelphians enjoy a rich inheritance. Their forebears chose a wonderful site for a city and built well. Independence and Carpenters Halls, the First and Second Banks, City Hall, the Museum of Art and the Parkway are only a few conspicious treasures, but one simple title embraces the largest single inheritance of all - Fairmount Park. The largest urban park in the world is also the finest. Its structure permeates much of the city and confers beauty and delight. The Cresheim and Wissahickon, Pennypack and Schuylkill, riparian lands and enclosing wooded slopes provide the skeleton.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Tchaikovsky wrote 10 operas but most American houses stage only a couple, including The Queen of Spades and Eugene Onegin (and even these, it seems to me, aren't performed often enough). Eugene Onegin is always special to encounter, as Tchaikovsky's music so sensitively elaborates the characters in Pushkin's love story (a poem actually) of tragically lost opportunities. Rising young Canadian baritone Gino Quilico, son of the baritone Louis Quilico, is expected to make a dashing title character in tonight's production of Eugene Onegin by the Opera Company of Philadelphia at the Academy of Music.
NEWS
January 24, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Prince John: Mother! He has a knife! Eleanor of Aquitaine: Of course he has a knife. I have a knife. We all have knives. It's 1183 and we are barbarians. And what witty barbarians they are, this ridiculously dysfunctional royal family struggling for power and land, betraying, fornicating, murdering, double-dealing, and slinging out one-liners all the while in The Lion in Winter. Eleanor was the richest woman in the world when she married Henry II, and he has, in the 30 years since then, become "the greatest power in a thousand years.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | BY JULIET C. WELKER
Jim, a successful 30-something male attorney, is divorced, rents a two- bedroom apartment in the 'burbs, and spends about an hour and a half each day commuting to Center City. "Jim," I said. "You must buy a home in the city this year! Both prices and interest rates are way down. " "But," he replied, "look at Donald Trump's problems because he bought real estate. " I hadn't realized that Trump's get-rich-quick deals with junk bonds and the S&Ls lining the pockets of the good ol' boys' real estate scams could obscure people's understanding of today's legitimate real estate opportunities.
NEWS
July 17, 1989
Let's not get into a swivet over whether Harold J. Katz wants to move our basketball team to New Jersey. Even Katz is smart enough to realize that the 76ers' lease with Spectacor, the firm that manages the Spectrum, runs through 1999. If Katz wants to break that lease, it would cost him about 1.5 million smackers, every year. The guy's not stupid. Katz isn't the issue we should be thinking about. Nor should we be thinking only about what to do with the reportedly unsafe John F. Kennedy Stadium.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | By William Raspberry
Someone once told me about a farmer who was hurrying home during a flash flood and, because he wasn't sure what to do, decided to ride his horse right through the rushing creek bordering his farm. Well, the situation was worse than the farmer thought, and the result was horse and rider were swept downstream, both nearly drowning before they managed to clamber to safety. After that, I was told, the farmer couldn't induce that horse to cross the creek even when the flow was a mere trickle.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louis Malone couldn't stop smiling about the opportunity his Marlton advertising firm sees in jumping onto the economic juggernaut known as the Republican National Convention. "It would be very influential for us to do business for anyone that's coming to the convention," said Malone, vice president for business development for Adventures in Advertising, which can create items such as banners, buttons, logos and T-shirts. "There are opportunities for all of us. " Yesterday, two top officials from Philadelphia 2000, the host and organizational arm of the convention, touted the GOP shindig to more than 100 business leaders here at a breakfast meeting sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Southern New Jersey.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The pay is decent and the title is nice. But the work involved, by almost every comparison that can be made among jobs in state government, isn't exactly exciting. So why are six people, including two respected state senators with a combined 38 years of legislative experience, seeking to capture the Democratic and Republican nominations for state auditor general in the April 28 primary? The opportunities, the candidates say. Opportunities to improve Pennsylvania's fiscal management, shape public policy, safeguard the taxpayers' dollars and leave a mark on the commonwealth.
SPORTS
November 24, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pittsburgh Steelers are a tough bunch that plays football on the muscular, visceral level. They're also almost universally picked to wind up in the AFC playoffs this season. So neither Steelers coach Bill Cowher nor any of his players could explain exactly what went wrong yesterday at Veterans Stadium, where the Eagles looked like the playoff-bound club and the Steelers a team that had simply lost its way. "It was a game of mistakes and missed opportunities," said Cowher, wincing at the impact of five turnovers by his offense and no takeaways by his defense.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 20, 2016
Two facts stand out about the constituency that has rallied to Donald Trump. His supporters are angry, and they come overwhelmingly from the less affluent reaches of the Republican Party. Ohio Gov. John Kasich is betting on the aspirations of these voters over their anger, and it's just possible that he's on to something his opponents are missing. For the angry vote, there is a lot of competition. The main dynamic of last Thursday's Republican debate was the clawing and jabbing between Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Trump.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2015
Services catering to children, seniors and pets. Child-enrichment, especially STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education, tutoring, sports agility/leagues, swimming. Adult entertainment, such as "paint-and-sip" studios. Senior care, nursing-home searches, hospice facilities, senior learning. Animal care, grooming and boarding. Food, especially noodle/salad bars, fresh-juice bars, artisan pizza, and low-calorie restaurants. Property management (for real estate, boats and vacation property)
SPORTS
December 17, 2015 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
BEFORE LAST week, Temple football had produced four All-Americas, each of whom played between 1970 and 1986. None were defensive players. One, offensive lineman Bill Singletary, had his number (64) retired. Another, quarterback Steve Joachim, won the Maxwell Award. Running back Paul Palmer finished runner-up for the Heisman Trophy. Now, senior linebacker Tyler Matakevich has gone past all of them as the most celebrated Owl ever to put on a helmet. And it might not even be close.
NEWS
November 29, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Willingboro convenience store worker fatally shot during a robbery Wednesday had come to America several years ago for better opportunities, and was sending money back to his family in Ghana, the store's owner said Friday. Matthew Mwinsori, 32, of Willingboro, was shot around 8:20 p.m. outside the Quick N Go in the 100 block of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Investigators on Friday were still looking for the shooter, who was seen entering the store on surveillance video. Sunny Singh, owner of the store, said Mwinsori had worked there and at a gas station Singh owns for almost a year, and that Mwinsori was closing out when the robbery occurred.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The winter holidays - starting with Thanksgiving this week - can be much more than a time for families to gather and celebrate. Mike Newell, a certified critical care nurse and case manager, says the visit to Grandma can also be an excellent time to assess how she is faring and consider whether you need to take extra steps to care for her. Newell is founder of Lifespan Care Management in Haddonfield. The company ( www.lifespancm.com ) offers health coordination and advocacy services for individuals and families.
SPORTS
November 20, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darren Sproles has spent his career watching players who were bigger or not as talented pass him over. The Eagles went out and signed two running backs this offseason that Chip Kelly hailed partly because of their size, and then slotted them ahead of Sproles despite his rushing production in 2014. After Kelly signed DeMarco Murray and Ryan Mathews in March, he said that he planned to utilize Sproles more in the passing game. While his catches per game have increased, his yards per catch have dropped.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie used what screen time he had during Wednesday's Republican presidential debate to press some of his biggest talking points: his willingness to overhaul Social Security and Medicare, and his law-enforcer message. But his other focus appeared to be Hillary Rodham Clinton, as he repeatedly used his opportunities - which were sparse, until he began interjecting late in the two-hour CNBC debate - to draw contrasts with the former secretary of state, who is the front-runner in the Democratic race.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Three hundred eleven years ago, the last time Pennsylvania's highest court had three vacancies, their replacements were up to the royal governor and, by extension, the queen. The three court vacancies to be filled on Nov. 3, two of them due to scandal, don't reflect the best work of the democracy that determines the composition of today's state Supreme Court. Dramatic reform, not to say another revolution, is in order. Fortunately, Pennsylvanians have the power to reshape the court this time, as well as a field of promising candidates to do so. How to retrieve a high court from a low point?
SPORTS
October 17, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not the role James Franklin was hired for, being the underdog, but it's the one he has this week, and one Penn State's coach is familiar with and even thrived in at his previous stop. Back in the preseason, you looked at Penn State's schedule and put the Nittany Lions down for 6-0 right now. It doesn't really matter what Franklin says after any game, at 5-1 his team is behind schedule. There's a chance, of course, to immediately turn that around. Nobody realistically had the Nits at 7-0 after the Ohio State game.
SPORTS
September 25, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rashon Lusane has strong ties to Norristown High School. His father, Rod, and brother, Rasheed, played football and wrestled for the Eagles. Rashon played the same sports as a freshman and sophomore at Norristown before transferring to Malvern Prep. "The opportunity presented itself," he said. "Nothing against Norristown, but I would have been a fool not to take advantage of it. " It was an opportunity that Lusane created. After falling short of the required entrance-exam grade for Malvern as an eighth-grader at Eisenhower Middle School, he excelled in the classroom at Norristown, with a 3.8 grade-point average, and passed on his second try. "Academically, going from Norristown to Malvern, was like night and day," Lusane said.
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