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Opportunities

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NEWS
May 6, 1988 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Spencer Gale Dennis Jr. has said that if his life had a theme, it was never letting an opportunity for advancement slip by. "Opportunities were made available to me," he told a reporter five years ago, "and I think because of that - because I knew that opportunities had not been afforded in the past to the extent that I was a beneficiary of - that I really should not waste them. " Born in an era of segregation, the first black man to serve as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania has made the most of opportunities in his 43 years - rising from boyhood in race-conscious Dover, Del., to the Merchant Marine Academy to the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania to chief of the Justice Department's narcotics and dangerous drug section in Washington, to the high-profile U.S. attorney's post in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 6, 1986 | By Ian L. McHarg
Philadelphians enjoy a rich inheritance. Their forebears chose a wonderful site for a city and built well. Independence and Carpenters Halls, the First and Second Banks, City Hall, the Museum of Art and the Parkway are only a few conspicious treasures, but one simple title embraces the largest single inheritance of all - Fairmount Park. The largest urban park in the world is also the finest. Its structure permeates much of the city and confers beauty and delight. The Cresheim and Wissahickon, Pennypack and Schuylkill, riparian lands and enclosing wooded slopes provide the skeleton.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Tchaikovsky wrote 10 operas but most American houses stage only a couple, including The Queen of Spades and Eugene Onegin (and even these, it seems to me, aren't performed often enough). Eugene Onegin is always special to encounter, as Tchaikovsky's music so sensitively elaborates the characters in Pushkin's love story (a poem actually) of tragically lost opportunities. Rising young Canadian baritone Gino Quilico, son of the baritone Louis Quilico, is expected to make a dashing title character in tonight's production of Eugene Onegin by the Opera Company of Philadelphia at the Academy of Music.
NEWS
January 24, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Prince John: Mother! He has a knife! Eleanor of Aquitaine: Of course he has a knife. I have a knife. We all have knives. It's 1183 and we are barbarians. And what witty barbarians they are, this ridiculously dysfunctional royal family struggling for power and land, betraying, fornicating, murdering, double-dealing, and slinging out one-liners all the while in The Lion in Winter. Eleanor was the richest woman in the world when she married Henry II, and he has, in the 30 years since then, become "the greatest power in a thousand years.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | BY JULIET C. WELKER
Jim, a successful 30-something male attorney, is divorced, rents a two- bedroom apartment in the 'burbs, and spends about an hour and a half each day commuting to Center City. "Jim," I said. "You must buy a home in the city this year! Both prices and interest rates are way down. " "But," he replied, "look at Donald Trump's problems because he bought real estate. " I hadn't realized that Trump's get-rich-quick deals with junk bonds and the S&Ls lining the pockets of the good ol' boys' real estate scams could obscure people's understanding of today's legitimate real estate opportunities.
NEWS
July 17, 1989
Let's not get into a swivet over whether Harold J. Katz wants to move our basketball team to New Jersey. Even Katz is smart enough to realize that the 76ers' lease with Spectacor, the firm that manages the Spectrum, runs through 1999. If Katz wants to break that lease, it would cost him about 1.5 million smackers, every year. The guy's not stupid. Katz isn't the issue we should be thinking about. Nor should we be thinking only about what to do with the reportedly unsafe John F. Kennedy Stadium.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | By William Raspberry
Someone once told me about a farmer who was hurrying home during a flash flood and, because he wasn't sure what to do, decided to ride his horse right through the rushing creek bordering his farm. Well, the situation was worse than the farmer thought, and the result was horse and rider were swept downstream, both nearly drowning before they managed to clamber to safety. After that, I was told, the farmer couldn't induce that horse to cross the creek even when the flow was a mere trickle.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louis Malone couldn't stop smiling about the opportunity his Marlton advertising firm sees in jumping onto the economic juggernaut known as the Republican National Convention. "It would be very influential for us to do business for anyone that's coming to the convention," said Malone, vice president for business development for Adventures in Advertising, which can create items such as banners, buttons, logos and T-shirts. "There are opportunities for all of us. " Yesterday, two top officials from Philadelphia 2000, the host and organizational arm of the convention, touted the GOP shindig to more than 100 business leaders here at a breakfast meeting sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Southern New Jersey.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The pay is decent and the title is nice. But the work involved, by almost every comparison that can be made among jobs in state government, isn't exactly exciting. So why are six people, including two respected state senators with a combined 38 years of legislative experience, seeking to capture the Democratic and Republican nominations for state auditor general in the April 28 primary? The opportunities, the candidates say. Opportunities to improve Pennsylvania's fiscal management, shape public policy, safeguard the taxpayers' dollars and leave a mark on the commonwealth.
SPORTS
November 24, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pittsburgh Steelers are a tough bunch that plays football on the muscular, visceral level. They're also almost universally picked to wind up in the AFC playoffs this season. So neither Steelers coach Bill Cowher nor any of his players could explain exactly what went wrong yesterday at Veterans Stadium, where the Eagles looked like the playoff-bound club and the Steelers a team that had simply lost its way. "It was a game of mistakes and missed opportunities," said Cowher, wincing at the impact of five turnovers by his offense and no takeaways by his defense.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Egg-glazed pastries, bright yellow egg tarts, and golden brown buns sit behind a glass window at Mong Kok Station, one of the many bakeries in Chinatown. There's a bakery at 109 N. 10th St. And, on the same block, two others plus Mong Kok at 153 N. 10th. That's four bakeries on one block, all offering almost the same thing: a cacophony of cream and carbohydrates. In the kitchen, dough is rising. And bun by bun, the bakers, some of them Chinese immigrants with little or no education and English language skills, are improving their lot in life.
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taking its lead from Pope Francis and the World Meeting of Families that will convene next month in Philadelphia, the Catholic Diocese of Camden on Monday announced a 40-day campaign to raise awareness of the profound poverty that pervades its six counties. Francis' arrival in Philadelphia on Sept. 26 "gives us the opportunity to focus on the poor . . . and to take action," Bishop Dennis Sullivan told a news conference. He noted that the diocese includes not only the state's poorest city, Camden, but its poorest county, Cumberland.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the World Meeting of Families, the world's largest Catholic gathering of families, draws near, there's a split in the family. Advocates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Catholics say the meeting is missing an opportunity by offering just one session on LGBT concerns out of dozens of panels over four days in Philadelphia. The event's organizers say the one-hour session - led by a gay, celibate man - is part of their efforts to keep the programming balanced. The tension reflects the church's ongoing struggle to test the waters on how to talk about same-sex marriage and other LGBT issues, while frustration grows among some Catholics who plunged into that conversation years ago. "The entire Catholic Church in America is having the discussion about LGBT issues, and yet there's no real discussion happening at the World Meeting of Families," said Francis DeBernardo, head of New Ways Ministry, a national group pushing for greater inclusion of LGBT parishioners.
SPORTS
August 7, 2015 | By Jesse Dougherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coach Derek Lewis knew that Trey Burton could excel at tight end for Florida, but in 2010 he couldn't persuade the freshman to trade six spots for one. Burton shuffled from wide receiver to running back to fullback to slot receiver to stand-up tight end, and even started at quarterback against Florida State. Against Kentucky, Burton set a school record with six touchdowns, five on the ground and one in the air. As the only first-year starter that season, he led Florida with 12 touchdowns, more than a fourth of the team's season total.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia property owner Richard Basciano has now sold off his entire real estate portfolio in Center City, opening a frontier for development along what had long been a blighted stretch of sex shops, empty buildings, and vacant land. Basciano's STB Investments Corp. has sold nearly an acre along the western portion of Market Street - including the site of Center City's last porn theater - since June to Brandywine Realty Trust, Parkway Corp., and PMC Property Group or their affiliates, according to city records and company officials.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Corporate mergers often mean layoffs, as new bosses redefine standards. But when Valley View at Elwyn, an assisted-living home for deaf residents, joined the Mercy Health System, something very different happened. Valley View's 13 direct-care providers are deaf and use American Sign Language with their patients, some of whom have lived there for 30 years. But Mercy LIFE (Living Independently for Elders) requires staff to be registered nurse aides, and Valley View's staff lacked that qualification.
SPORTS
July 8, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
SALT LAKE CITY - Nik Stauskas was the centerpiece of the 76ers' deal with the Sacramento Kings last week, but another acquisition expects to help his new team. South Jersey's Jason Thompson intends to fulfill a vital role with the squad he grew up following. "I'm expecting to come in here ready and have an impact from Day 1," Thompson said in a telephone interview. "I know they have a big amount of bigs, but I'm trying to come in there and re-amp myself. " The Sixers received the sharpshooting Stauskas, Thompson and Carl Landry, a 2018 protected first-round pick and the option to swap 2016 and 2017 first-rounders last week, all in exchange for recent second-round picks Arturas Gudaitis (47th overall)
SPORTS
June 29, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
HOUSTON - Ana Ulloa Romero and her two younger children reached their arms over the car tire supporting them as they propelled themselves through the murky Rio Grande toward the hope of something better. Debris and water started filling the tire, pulling them downward and scaring the younger ones, whom Romero comforted with quick prayers . Please God, protect my family. Somewhere in the desert expanse ahead of them, Romero's husband, Oscar, was crossing with "coyotes," human smugglers.
SPORTS
June 26, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
EARLIER THIS month, former Phillie and current Cleveland Indian Brandon Moss hit his 100th home run into the visiting bullpen at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City. Good place to hit a milestone home run, right? Yes and no. The Indians' relievers got the ball. Then they sent Moss a ransom note, filled with an assortment of Apple products, from iPads and iPhones to three MacBook Airs and an Apple Watch. The Indians' rotation pulled the same trick last week, when rookie shortstop Francisco Lindor collected his first big-league hit. Well, word travels fast in the baseball universe.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration on Tuesday laid out an ambitious vision for assuring that all children in Philadelphia benefit from high-quality early learning experiences. Labeled "A Running Start Philadelphia: For Every Child, Birth to Five," the outline offers guidance on how the city can guarantee the best learning opportunities for its youngest citizens as a way to offset the long-term, systemic poverty in some neighborhoods. "With this plan, Philadelphia has developed a strategy to support its children and families by building stronger schools to create a more competitive workforce," Nutter said.
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