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Opportunities

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NEWS
May 6, 1988 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Spencer Gale Dennis Jr. has said that if his life had a theme, it was never letting an opportunity for advancement slip by. "Opportunities were made available to me," he told a reporter five years ago, "and I think because of that - because I knew that opportunities had not been afforded in the past to the extent that I was a beneficiary of - that I really should not waste them. " Born in an era of segregation, the first black man to serve as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania has made the most of opportunities in his 43 years - rising from boyhood in race-conscious Dover, Del., to the Merchant Marine Academy to the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania to chief of the Justice Department's narcotics and dangerous drug section in Washington, to the high-profile U.S. attorney's post in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 6, 1986 | By Ian L. McHarg
Philadelphians enjoy a rich inheritance. Their forebears chose a wonderful site for a city and built well. Independence and Carpenters Halls, the First and Second Banks, City Hall, the Museum of Art and the Parkway are only a few conspicious treasures, but one simple title embraces the largest single inheritance of all - Fairmount Park. The largest urban park in the world is also the finest. Its structure permeates much of the city and confers beauty and delight. The Cresheim and Wissahickon, Pennypack and Schuylkill, riparian lands and enclosing wooded slopes provide the skeleton.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Tchaikovsky wrote 10 operas but most American houses stage only a couple, including The Queen of Spades and Eugene Onegin (and even these, it seems to me, aren't performed often enough). Eugene Onegin is always special to encounter, as Tchaikovsky's music so sensitively elaborates the characters in Pushkin's love story (a poem actually) of tragically lost opportunities. Rising young Canadian baritone Gino Quilico, son of the baritone Louis Quilico, is expected to make a dashing title character in tonight's production of Eugene Onegin by the Opera Company of Philadelphia at the Academy of Music.
NEWS
January 24, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Prince John: Mother! He has a knife! Eleanor of Aquitaine: Of course he has a knife. I have a knife. We all have knives. It's 1183 and we are barbarians. And what witty barbarians they are, this ridiculously dysfunctional royal family struggling for power and land, betraying, fornicating, murdering, double-dealing, and slinging out one-liners all the while in The Lion in Winter. Eleanor was the richest woman in the world when she married Henry II, and he has, in the 30 years since then, become "the greatest power in a thousand years.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | BY JULIET C. WELKER
Jim, a successful 30-something male attorney, is divorced, rents a two- bedroom apartment in the 'burbs, and spends about an hour and a half each day commuting to Center City. "Jim," I said. "You must buy a home in the city this year! Both prices and interest rates are way down. " "But," he replied, "look at Donald Trump's problems because he bought real estate. " I hadn't realized that Trump's get-rich-quick deals with junk bonds and the S&Ls lining the pockets of the good ol' boys' real estate scams could obscure people's understanding of today's legitimate real estate opportunities.
NEWS
July 17, 1989
Let's not get into a swivet over whether Harold J. Katz wants to move our basketball team to New Jersey. Even Katz is smart enough to realize that the 76ers' lease with Spectacor, the firm that manages the Spectrum, runs through 1999. If Katz wants to break that lease, it would cost him about 1.5 million smackers, every year. The guy's not stupid. Katz isn't the issue we should be thinking about. Nor should we be thinking only about what to do with the reportedly unsafe John F. Kennedy Stadium.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | By William Raspberry
Someone once told me about a farmer who was hurrying home during a flash flood and, because he wasn't sure what to do, decided to ride his horse right through the rushing creek bordering his farm. Well, the situation was worse than the farmer thought, and the result was horse and rider were swept downstream, both nearly drowning before they managed to clamber to safety. After that, I was told, the farmer couldn't induce that horse to cross the creek even when the flow was a mere trickle.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louis Malone couldn't stop smiling about the opportunity his Marlton advertising firm sees in jumping onto the economic juggernaut known as the Republican National Convention. "It would be very influential for us to do business for anyone that's coming to the convention," said Malone, vice president for business development for Adventures in Advertising, which can create items such as banners, buttons, logos and T-shirts. "There are opportunities for all of us. " Yesterday, two top officials from Philadelphia 2000, the host and organizational arm of the convention, touted the GOP shindig to more than 100 business leaders here at a breakfast meeting sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Southern New Jersey.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The pay is decent and the title is nice. But the work involved, by almost every comparison that can be made among jobs in state government, isn't exactly exciting. So why are six people, including two respected state senators with a combined 38 years of legislative experience, seeking to capture the Democratic and Republican nominations for state auditor general in the April 28 primary? The opportunities, the candidates say. Opportunities to improve Pennsylvania's fiscal management, shape public policy, safeguard the taxpayers' dollars and leave a mark on the commonwealth.
SPORTS
November 24, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pittsburgh Steelers are a tough bunch that plays football on the muscular, visceral level. They're also almost universally picked to wind up in the AFC playoffs this season. So neither Steelers coach Bill Cowher nor any of his players could explain exactly what went wrong yesterday at Veterans Stadium, where the Eagles looked like the playoff-bound club and the Steelers a team that had simply lost its way. "It was a game of mistakes and missed opportunities," said Cowher, wincing at the impact of five turnovers by his offense and no takeaways by his defense.
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SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
CHICAGO - It was Ryne Sandberg's first chance to have an umpire's call reversed, but the Phillies manager declined. With runners at first and second and one out in the top of the fourth inning, catcher Wil Nieves hit a grounder at Mike Olt that was a tailor-made double play for the Chicago Cubs third baseman. He fielded it cleanly, moved toward the bag at third, and threw over to first for the final out of the inning. Chicago left the field. The Phillies took the field. Cliff Lee started warming up. And then Sandberg emerged from the visitors' dugout for a conversation with third-base umpire Hal Gibson, who assured the manager that Olt had pushed off the bag to start the double play.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia will lose more than 600 jobs when homegrown Destination Maternity Corp. leaves its headquarters at Fifth and Spring Garden Streets for South Jersey. But unlike other gloomy portraits of corporations defecting to the suburbs, this one may have a silver lining for the city. Diverse proposals are emerging to buy the retailer's headquarters and distribution complex, a colossal parcel of nearly eight acres in an industrial-zoned enclave that has changed little as neighboring Old City and Northern Liberties grew into upscale residential communities over the last two decades.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If you're a fan of buying low and selling high, then some (but not all) markets outside the U.S. might represent value for your portfolio. We interviewed Mebane Faber (his first name is Scottish, pronounced "meb-bin"), a portfolio manager running about $350 million in assets. His firm recently launched a new exchange-traded fund called the Cambria Global Value ETF (GVAL). This fund invests in roughly 100 stocks in the world's most undervalued markets, and Faber says those are - brace yourselves - Greece, Russia, Hungary, Ireland, Spain, Czech Republic, Italy, and Portugal.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
IF YOU are a business in Pennsylvania, you can live in a tax paradise without having to move to the Cayman Islands. In some cases, you just have to move across town. In 1998, in order to stimulate job growth, the Legislature created a device called Keystone Opportunity Zones - areas where businesses could move and pay virtually no state and local business taxes for 15 years. Philadelphia has a number of KOZs - the Cira Centre and the Naval Yard, to name just two - where businesses have clustered.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
VOORHEES Last year's passage of the Economic Opportunity Act rejiggered the formula to give South Jersey access to grants and tax incentives to lure businesses and investors - development carrots that the more heavily populated northern end of the state previously held claim to. Six months after the measure became law, many say the ripple effect is already being felt regionally. Among them are officials in Camden County and those as far south as Cumberland and Salem Counties who gathered Friday in Voorhees.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under Pennsylvania's Keystone Opportunity Zone Program, 617 businesses received city tax credits worth $384.7 million from 1999 through 2012, according to a report released Wednesday by Philadelphia City Controller Alan Butkovitz. But 424 of those firms were partnerships or limited liability companies that had no employees paying wage taxes - the main short-term payoff for Philadelphia under the KOZ program, which virtually eliminates state and local business taxes for companies that move into underdeveloped, desolate areas.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campus Philly was created in 2000 amid hand-wringing over the Philadelphia region's bumper crop of college graduates leaving the area, diplomas packed in their suitcases. Then, the organization's job was to sell the city to students in the hope that they would stay. With the city's popularity growing among young people, that sale has been made, said Deborah Diamond, the organization's president. Now, she said, the 392,491 students enrolled in 101 area colleges are asking, "How can I stay here?
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
JARVIS VARNADO, like a lot of players on the 76ers roster, is a man of few words. But when approached by reporters to talk about signing a new contract with the team, the reserved big man couldn't help but break out into a huge smile. Varnado said Tuesday's deal will keep him here this season and then two non-guaranteed seasons after that. "This is a great opportunity for me to stick my name in this league and coach is giving me an opportunity to play so I just have to take advantage of it," Varnado said yesterday.
SPORTS
February 21, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
IT'S YOUR last chance, America. Surely that's what NHL commissioner Gary Bettman implied this week and again yesterday morning on NBC. Four years from now, should the United States Olympic hockey team square off against Canada in a medal-deciding game, you will need to be a fan of college hockey or junior hockey to recognize any of the names. Or to care. So this is it. High noon today here, 9 p.m. Sochi time. A team of America's best NHL players against a team of Canada's best NHL players meeting in a knockout game for the second Olympics in a row, the third time in four Games.
SPORTS
February 4, 2014 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Staff Writer
IN LATE JANUARY last year, La Salle was 12-5 and not really in the NCAA conversation. The Explorers promptly beat Butler at home and then won at VCU on the way to winning nine of 11 and pushing right into the at-large pool. Saint Joseph's is in exactly the same position in early February. The Hawks were 14-6 heading into Saturday's home game with Massachusetts. Like La Salle last year, SJU is looking at opportunity over 8 days, all at home, with games this week against the Atlantic 10's best, Saint Louis and VCU. The Hawks got the first part of the trifecta, but definitely made it harder than it should have been.
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