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NEWS
May 29, 2003 | By Thomas L. Lewis
Open and vigorous debate is to be expected on new legislation. How else can legislators - and the public - be informed about the issues at hand? However, it's not unknown for debate to go off the rails and lose any pretense of educating and informing in favor of pure invective. That's what happened in New Jersey with the Optometric Scope of Practice Act, a measure that was intended to expand the level of practice provided by New Jersey optometrists. In their zeal to defeat the bill, opponents slandered the entire medical discipline of optometry, leaving the public with the impression that optometry can be placed somewhere between aromatherapy and mesmerism.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Buyers of eyeglasses and contact lenses could save millions of dollars each year because of a new Federal Trade Commission ruling against widespread state laws restraining economic competition in optometry. The rule, scheduled to take effect Sept. 1, overturns state laws that prohibit optometrists from owning or working for chain stores; bar optometry offices from shopping malls, or stop optometrists from using trade names over their offices. Forty-four states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, had one or more such laws in 1985, according to a commission survey.
NEWS
June 25, 2000 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Pennsylvania College of Optometry in Elkins Park recently initiated a professional doctoral-degree program in audiology with an emphasis on biomedical studies and clinical training. "Our students will have between 2,000 and 3,000 actual clinical hours of experience, where traditional graduate-school requirements are 300 hours," said George S. Osborne, dean of the college's School of Audiology. The emphasis on clinical training over research distinguishes the college's professional Au.D.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | By Kate Campbell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Pennsylvania College of Optometry made the decision to uproot two years ago, its directors worried that there might be hard feelings in the East Oak Lane neighborhood where the school had been a thriving part of the community since 1932. But during a dedication ceremony yesterday in front of the college's new, glass-exterior facility in Elkins Park, it was clear that no bridges had been burned. Instead, college directors and local politicians lined the shimmering campus lake and waxed philosophical on the treasure that East Oak Lane and Cheltenham Township now share.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | Inquirer photographs by Sharon J. Wohlmuth
At the Montgomery County Association for the Blind in Norristown, Richard Brillant recently gave a presentation to people with low vision. Brillant, an associate professor at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry, said that more than 11 1/2 million Americans are visually impaired. Among the glasses he brought along were multiple-pinhole sunglasses that he designed to reduce light.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | BY G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
The Pennsylvania College of Optometry has announced a multi-year program aimed at providing free vision screenings for children and adults at schools throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The program, announced to coincide with the college's Save Your Vision Month campaign was launched with screenings of students and teachers from the Gesu School in North Philadelphia. The program targets some 40,000 Catholic school children and their parents for screenings over the next several years.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerry Davidoff, 58, of West Chester, an optometrist, died of lung cancer on Wednesday, Nov. 30, at Chester County Hospital. Dr. Davidoff joined his father Sydney's optometry practice in Broomall in 1981 and took over the practice when his father retired. Ten years ago, he opened a second office in West Chester. In tributes sent to his family, Dr. Davidoff's patients commented on his sense of humor, his caring, and how comfortable he made them feel. He often provided optometric care for those who had no insurance, his family said.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alvin J. Cuff, 70, a pioneering African American optometrist whose early struggles led him to help organize an association for black eye-care professionals, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at the West Oak Lane home where he had practiced for more than 30 years. Dr. Cuff, the son of a maintenance worker from Darby, paid his way through Lincoln University, where he earned a bachelor of science degree, by working at odd jobs. While employed as a postal worker, he met an African American optometry student who inspired him to enter the field.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. J.G. Emil Roeger Sr., 94, a retired Philadelphia optometrist, died Thursday of pneumonia and respiratory failure at North Arundel Hospital in Glen Burnie, Md. At the time of his death, he was living with his daughter in Glen Burnie. Dr. Roeger, a native of Philadelphia, was a 1926 graduate of the Pennsylvania State College of Optometry. He had his office for more than 50 years in the Bailey Building at 12th and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia. He retired at age 79. Dr. Roeger was a former instructor and assistant clinical chief of the Pennsylvania State College of Optometry.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Arcadia University and Salus University said Friday that they have entered into a strategic alliance to share educational, clinical, and administrative resources. Students at Arcadia would be able to study advanced health technologies offered by Salus, while Salus students, faculty, and alumni could take part in Arcadia's programs abroad, the two Montgomery County schools said in a news release. The universities already share an optometry program. Students complete three years of pre-optometry science studies at Arcadia, in Glenside, followed by four years at Salus, based in Elkins Park.
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BUSINESS
December 20, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Arcadia University and Salus University said Friday that they have entered into a strategic alliance to share educational, clinical, and administrative resources. Students at Arcadia would be able to study advanced health technologies offered by Salus, while Salus students, faculty, and alumni could take part in Arcadia's programs abroad, the two Montgomery County schools said in a news release. The universities already share an optometry program. Students complete three years of pre-optometry science studies at Arcadia, in Glenside, followed by four years at Salus, based in Elkins Park.
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
J. Marvin Bloom, 81, of Blue Bell, an optometrist in Center City for 40 years, died Saturday, May 24, of cancer at his home. Before retiring in 2000, Dr. Bloom practiced optometry and fitted patients with contact lenses from an office at 12th and Market Streets. He was much beloved by his many patients, his family said. "We are hearing from hundreds of people who knew him. It is unbelievable," said his wife, Dene Samitz Bloom. Born in Chester, Dr. Bloom graduated from Chester High School in 1950 and the Pennsylvania College of Optometry with a doctor of optometry degree in 1955.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Kushner, 96, of Bala Cynwyd, an optometrist who served on the Pennsylvania State Board of Optometrical Examiners, died Sunday, Jan. 5, of cardiovascular failure at his home. A leader in his medical profession since graduating from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry in 1940, Dr. Kushner was appointed in 1961 to the state examining board for a four-year term. He was reappointed by Govs. William W. Scranton, Raymond P. Shafer, Milton J. Shapp, and Richard L. Thornburgh, and served as chairman of the board for many years.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Mike Mittelman, the new president of Salus University, believes strongly in the importance of a sound body for a sound mind. During his three decades in the Navy, he ran a dozen marathons and participated in several Olympic-distance triathlons. A graduate of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry, the institution that evolved into Salus, he is frustrated that so few people are familiar with Salus, what it offers, and the exciting work it is doing not only to improve vision but also to enhance health care in a wide variety of realms.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Herman R. Raines, 89, of Wynnewood, a decorated World War II veteran who served as a combat medic in several historic battles before returning home to pursue a career in optometry, died Sunday, Dec. 22, at Lankenau Hospital after a brief illness. Dr. Raines rose to the rank of first lieutenant and assistant battalion aid surgeon in the U.S. Army and fought in many European conflicts, including in Normandy, France, and Rhineland, Germany. He was awarded the American Campaign Medal, the European, North African and Middle Eastern Medals with three battle stars, and the Bronze Star for remaining in position and saving lives while under intense fire, his family said.
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard D. Bay, 67, publisher and president of Jobson Medical Information in Newtown Square, died Sunday, Dec. 2, of metastatic parotid cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Bay started out working in the mail room at Chilton Publishing Co. fresh from John Bartram High School in 1962. "We all came from West Philadelphia, and this was a big deal working at Chilton," said his wife, the former Jeanne Kirk. "His job was stacking and delivering the mail. " Over the years, Mr. Bay learned a succession of jobs - assistant production manager, writer, associate editor, managing editor, business manager and publisher of Chilton magazines such as Motor Age, Hardware Age, and Food Engineering.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerry Davidoff, 58, of West Chester, an optometrist, died of lung cancer on Wednesday, Nov. 30, at Chester County Hospital. Dr. Davidoff joined his father Sydney's optometry practice in Broomall in 1981 and took over the practice when his father retired. Ten years ago, he opened a second office in West Chester. In tributes sent to his family, Dr. Davidoff's patients commented on his sense of humor, his caring, and how comfortable he made them feel. He often provided optometric care for those who had no insurance, his family said.
NEWS
June 19, 2003
Public education is real failure High school English teacher Olga Polites wrote an indictment of the high school proficiency test ("Test for proficiency must check its own," May 28). Her column really indicts American public education and her own work. One of the proficiency test's essays deals with religion. Polites cried foul. Does she realize that religion, for better or for worse, was a foundation of Western civilization? Perhaps the state expects its schools to produce educated citizens.
NEWS
May 29, 2003 | By Thomas L. Lewis
Open and vigorous debate is to be expected on new legislation. How else can legislators - and the public - be informed about the issues at hand? However, it's not unknown for debate to go off the rails and lose any pretense of educating and informing in favor of pure invective. That's what happened in New Jersey with the Optometric Scope of Practice Act, a measure that was intended to expand the level of practice provided by New Jersey optometrists. In their zeal to defeat the bill, opponents slandered the entire medical discipline of optometry, leaving the public with the impression that optometry can be placed somewhere between aromatherapy and mesmerism.
NEWS
May 13, 2003
Regarding Monica Yant Kinney's column, I would like to clarify my position as to legislation I sponsored to improve the education and certification system for optometrists. ("Bill retreat: More than meets the eye," April 22.) This measure was crafted to enable optometrists to use a wider array of sight-correction technologies in their practices. I have withdrawn the bill for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that it triggered a new wave of unproductive contention between the state's ophthalmologists and optometrists.
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