CollectionsOpus
IN THE NEWS

Opus

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1990 | By Marilyn Beck, Special to the Daily News
Columbia Records is rushing "Simon and Garfunkel: Collected Works" - a three-cassette/compact disc set containing 58 of the duo's classic songs - onto the shelves by Jan. 17. The special project is in commemoration of the induction of Simon and Garfunkel into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame later this month. Also due to be inducted in ceremonies are The Who, the Kinks, the Four Tops, Frankie Vallee and the Four Seasons, the Platters, Hank Ballard and the late Bobby Darin. "Collected Works," which features previously unpublished lyrics from Simon and Garfunkel tunes, was digitally remastered by Roy Halee, the engineer of the duo's original five albums.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
"My life is now defined by its endings and its closures," Terry Beck intones and then makes chalk marks over and over on the floor with increasing hysteria. After he's all but destroyed his chalk, Tim Early dream-walks on, snipping strands of his curly brown hair. All the while, Josh Walbert has been standing at the back of the stage, almost nude, in a "silent scream. " Now he lets go with a dance of self-flagellation. If you want to start a dance with a bang, Lina Antonini Early's Running - one of four dances she choreographed for her Opus 1 Contemporary's weekend show at the Mandell Theater - is the way to do it. But at some point soon after this introductory chapter to Early's version of hell, Running loses its edge and its focus.
NEWS
April 5, 2004 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
Two engaging works by the late Anna Sokolow anchored Dancefusion's new program, continuing its admirable mission of reconstructing early modern dance by Sokolow and others. The company shared this full but not over-long evening at the Painted Bride with Opus 1 Contemporary Dance, a local group making its first appearance in the city. Sokolow's 1974 Quartertones, a solo danced on Saturday by Janet Pilla, seemed at first to recall Martha Graham's solo works - not surprising, given that Sokolow studied and danced with Graham.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
BEETHOVEN'S FINAL string quartet, the seething Opus 131, is the catalyst in Michael Hollinger's fascinating "Opus," now having its world premiere at the Arden Theatre. The play depicts a famed string quartet's struggle with the departure and replacement of one of its members. The five actors in the cast simulate their playing, but since they are supposed to be world-class musicians, real world-class music was needed. The production turned to a quartet of Curtis Institute students who recorded fragments of four classical pieces - including mistakes - that are woven into the story.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's a tree with a showy, blazing flower. It's a traffic artery cutting across L.A.'s San Fernando Valley. And now it's a movie: Magnolia, Paul Thomas Anderson's dazzling, daring opus, long and showy - and pretty brilliant - that begins in a blaze of glory (and stories), traverses a road rife with lane-changes, intersections, stops and starts, and winds up whomping us on the head with surprise. It's an audacious - and, OK, excessive - meditation on Big Stuff: chance; fate; the sins of the father visited on the son (and daughter)
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Opus, about the intrigues among musicians in a string quartet, has meant good things for Philadelphia's Arden Theatre Company ever since it came to life on Arden's stage two years ago, then moved on to a New York production. The vibe continues: On Monday night, the play's sound designer, Jorge Cousineau, won Off-Broadway's top theater award for his work on Opus. Cousineau, the busiest sound, light and multimedia designer for professional stages in metropolitan Philadelphia, was at Manhattan's Union Square Theatre for the announcement of the winners of the Lucille Lortel Awards - Off-Broadway's version of the Tonys, chosen by theater artists, journalists and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1989 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
We were warned. Cartoonist Berke Breathed announced in April that, effective Aug. 6, he was discontinuing "Bloom County," the irreverent strip that won him the Pulitzer Prize for distinguished cartooning in 1987. "The ugly truth is that, in most cases, comics age less gracefully than their creators," Breathed said then in a statement released by the Washington Post Writers Group, which syndicates the strip. "Bloom County is retiring before the stretch marks show. " But what Breathed saw as stretch marks the rest of us viewed as laugh lines.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | by Sono Motoyama, Daily News Staff Writer
This is the fantasy: You're sitting in a lush garden on a sultry summer evening, humid enough that you feel a slight dew on your skin but breezy enough so the heat isn't oppressive. You're sitting alone, perhaps sipping a cocktail. Then suddenly into the garden strolls the handsome scion of a wealthy European family, who then sits down at your table. Lounging in the garden at Opus 251 will encourage such daydreams. And in fact, my experience there was a pretty close approximation, although instead of the hero of a romance novel, I had to make do with my friend Andrei.
NEWS
October 20, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Burns doesn't lock his monsters away in the closet. They're out there in plain view in the artist's Northern Liberties living room. On one shelf scores of ghastly figurines look as if they roared straight out of a Godzilla movie, while fearsome Japanese robots stand ready for battle across the way. They're all over Burns' richly detailed drawings, whose woodcut-like precision is familiar not only to alt-comic fans, but also to anyone who's seen his Altoids ads, album covers (Iggy Pop's Brick by Brick, among others)
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | By John Corr and Marjorie Matthews Corr, Special to The Inquirer
Here in the Hudson Valley lie two of the most remarkable - even astonishing - outdoor "museums" anywhere, places to experience works of sculpture that can only be called heroic. The Storm King Art Center occupies 400 acres of carefully tended, rolling fields and woodlands outside this town, 60 miles north of New York. More than 100 sculptures - many of them massive - by distinguished modern sculptors from around the world are brilliantly placed in the landscape, so that a stroll through the trees and over the hills becomes a series of delightful surprises.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Often lost amid all the exactitude issuing from conservatories today is the reason we make music in the first place. It's not about being able to play all the notes or play them in tune. Interpretation has to mean something if it is to be worth the trouble, especially since the trouble is considerable. How fortunate, then, must be the students of Miriam Fried, the violin pedagogue who teaches at the New England Conservatory. On Sunday night, for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, she came to the Perelman Theater with one of her progeny - in fact, her prime progeny, pianist Jonathan Biss, who happens to be her son. Whatever their offstage dynamics may be, in terms of musical substance it was a performance of equals - if very different ones.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
In Chopin, it's about liberty - or at least, liberties. But Emanuel Ax isn't taking them, not many and not to any great extent, which makes him a minor radical. The pianistic tradition in this repertoire of erasing bar lines, blurring note values, and delivering the listener to time-defying spaciousness goes back a century or more. In Thursday night's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital at the Perelman Theater, Ax neither floated nor dallied in his encore, the Nocturne No. 5 in F Sharp, Op. 15 No. 2 . You could have set your metronome to sections of Chopin's Piano Sonata in B Minor, Opus 58 . Shouldn't the sonata's last movement be terrifying, the unexpected climax of a four-movement bildungsroman?
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
In their Philadelphia debut Thursday night, the Modigliani Quartet seemed to need some time to size up the Perelman Theater. This was the first stop on a U.S. tour, and the Paris-based group, opening with Haydn in a Philadelphia Chamber Music Society appearance, was reasonably tight. But something clicked in the next piece, Schumann, and from then on, they - and you - felt surety about the quartet's personality. What kind of personality it was shifted throughout the evening. The opening of the Haydn, the String Quartet in G Major, Opus 76, No. 1 , put perfectly matched sounds on display with a figure that passed from cellist François Kieffer, to violist Laurent Marfaing, second violinist Loïc Rio, and first violinist Philippe Bernhard.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Ghosts of performers past stand guard over standard repertoire, and it takes a ruthless individualist to wave then off. But Nareh Arghamanyan never seemed to consciously repudiate her predecessors in an extraordinarily charismatic Philadelphia Chamber Music Society appearance Wednesday night at the American Philosophical Society. Rather, it was as if the 23-year-old Armenian-born pianist had never encountered them at all, and was interested only in her own personal communions with Bach, Schumann, and Rachmaninoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By ROGER MOORE, The Orlando Sentinel
The last time we took any note of Roland Joffe, the director of "The Mission" and "The Killing Fields," it was through his take on the ugly genre "torture porn" titled "Captivity" back in 2007. To be fair, he followed that up with the lesbian murder mystery "You and I," which even fewer people saw. He's back in theaters and back in the world of period pieces with "There Be Dragons," a Spanish Civil War tale that tells the story of Josemaria Escriva, the founder of the Catholic Opus Dei organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
If movies could be judged by good intentions alone, then Roland Joffé's There Be Dragons , a sweeping historical drama about war, Christian ethics, the nature of forgiveness, and sainthood, would be a masterpiece. Sadly, it's not. Far from it. There Be Dragons marks a return of sorts to Joffé's early career and his celebrated films about religion and the morality of war - The Killing Fields (1984) and The Mission (1986). It chronicles the life of St. Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer (1902-1975)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2011 | By RON TODT, Associated Press
The world-renowned Philadelphia Orchestra, long considered one of the best in the nation, will be filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection - an apparent first in recent history for a major U.S. orchestra. Board chairman Richard Worley said that members made a nearly unanimous vote Saturday to file for reorganization in a federal bankruptcy court in Philadelphia after a "long meeting, thoughtful meeting, emotional meeting. " "We're running low on cash, we're running a deficit and we have to put ourselves in a position to attract investment funds to help us," Worley told reporters.
NEWS
March 18, 2010 | By Emily Tartanella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's make a sandwich. Take two helpings of Thelma and Louise, a dollop of Russ Meyer's sexploitation film The Big Dollhouse, put it all in between two slices of Quentin Tarantino, and for heaven's sake, don't forget the Miracle Whip. Leave it to Lady Gaga, with a little help from Beyonc?, to make a most innocuous American condiment suddenly so subversive. Because if you've seen the new video for their collaborative single "Telephone," which premiered March 11 (the "official explicit version," that is)
LIVING
December 14, 2008 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We at The Inquirer are big readers. Below are staff recommendations of much-enjoyed books, old and new. All prices are hardcover only. Nonfiction. Bill Marimow, editor of The Inquirer, writes: "I thoroughly enjoyed Truman by David McCullough [Simon & Schuster, 1,120 pp., $40]. It's an opus, but it was a highly readable, illuminating opus. " Nick Cristiano, copy editor and country/roots reviewer, likes Ted Gioia's Delta Blues (W.W. Norton, 448 pp., $27.95), about the blues, the people who invented the music, and the people who first carried it on. Foreign-affairs columnist Trudy Rubin recommends My Father's Paradise by Ariel Sabar (Algonquin, 325 pp., $25.95)
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Opus, about the intrigues among musicians in a string quartet, has meant good things for Philadelphia's Arden Theatre Company ever since it came to life on Arden's stage two years ago, then moved on to a New York production. The vibe continues: On Monday night, the play's sound designer, Jorge Cousineau, won Off-Broadway's top theater award for his work on Opus. Cousineau, the busiest sound, light and multimedia designer for professional stages in metropolitan Philadelphia, was at Manhattan's Union Square Theatre for the announcement of the winners of the Lucille Lortel Awards - Off-Broadway's version of the Tonys, chosen by theater artists, journalists and others.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|