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Oral Cancer

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NEWS
May 3, 2010 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Diane Allen lay on a gurney at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, she knew she had to learn to let go. She had found the right doctor, the right hospital. She told relatives and close friends she was about to undergo surgery for an aggressive form of oral cancer. Part of her tongue and part of the floor of her mouth were to be removed in that November surgery. Her doctors had told her she probably would never speak normally again. So, the woman who had made a living talking - as a television news reporter and anchor in Philadelphia and Chicago and most recently as a Republican New Jersey state senator - probably would lose one of her greatest assets.
FOOD
July 13, 1986 | The Inquirer staff
A form of carotene, the substance found in carrots and leafy green vegetables, has been shown to shrink and prevent cancer tumors in the mouths of hamsters, and that might lead to a nontoxic treatment for human oral cancer, Harvard University researchers said last week. "It would be wonderful if we could have something that works in humans that wouldn't be as toxic as the current chemotherapy," said Dr. Gerald Shklar of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. In one part of the experiment, Shklar, Dr. Joel Schwartz and their associates painted a cancer-causing chemical solution on the pouches found inside hamsters' mouths.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curt Schilling blames his oral cancer on 30 years of chewing tobacco. While it is impossible to say for sure in any one person's case, that conclusion by the former Phillies pitcher is certainly plausible, cancer experts say. "I can't taste anything and I can't smell anything," Schilling said this month during a Boston radio telethon, according to MLB.com. Schilling, 47, retired in 2007 after 20 seasons in the major leagues, 81/2 with the Phillies. And he is unlikely to be the last to be affected, despite continued efforts by Major League Baseball to discourage the habit.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge has chewed out a local dentist for fraudulent Medicare billings and drilled him for $18 million in "civil penalties," even though the crooked bills totaled less than $131,000. The judgment might be "excessive and out of proportion to the damages sustained," U.S. District Judge Joseph L. McGlynn observed. But the law embraces a minimum penalty of $5,000 for each of the 3,683 false claims submitted, and this left him powerless to enter a lower judgment, the judge noted.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | By Mary Ann Roser, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Alarmed by the growing use of smokeless tobacco products by young males and the potential for a "cancer time bomb," a national physicians group called yesterday for an advertising ban on snuff and chewing tobacco. A tobacco industry organization and the American Civil Liberties Union immediately promised to fight any such ban in court, contending that it would be an unconstitutional infringement of free speech. Smokeless tobacco products are highly addictive and wrongly considered a safe alternative to smoking, said members of the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, as they announced a "Through With Chew" campaign.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
I OWE, I OWE Wrestling with bills? Join the crowd. Eighty-five percent of all U.S. households owed money at some time last year - on mortgages and automobiles, credit cards and department store wares. Household debt nearly tripled in the last decade, according to a Federal Reserve study. The study says that total household debt represented 83.5 percent of disposable personal income in December, up from 65.4 percent in 1980. CHEW ON THIS It's commendable to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time, but it's dangerous to drink (alcohol)
NEWS
November 21, 1994 | BY ANTHONY FAROLE, D.M.D
I would like to shed some light on an ill-advised smoking-cessation strategy you may have read about lately. The strategy recommends that cigarette smokers who are having difficulty quitting switch to smokeless tobacco instead. An article that appeared this summer in the American Journal of Medical Sciences argues that this is a good idea because cigarette smoking is linked to numerous health problems ranging from heart disease to lung cancer, while smokeless tobacco is associated only with an increased risk of oral cancers.
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
To the delight of the tobacco industry and the dismay of health professionals, the Bush administration yesterday scuttled a move in Congress to raise taxes on snuff and chewing tobacco to discourage their use. Studies have linked the smokeless tobacco products to high rates of oral cancer and other gum and dental diseases. The House Ways and Means Committee dropped a proposal by Chairman Dan Rostenkowski (D., Ill.) to impose a major tax increase on the items after administration officials said it would violate President Bush's campaign pledge of "no new taxes.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Bill Tuttle was just starting out in baseball with the Detroit Tigers in the early 1950s when, like many other ballplayers, he picked up a chewing tobacco habit. Last year, he was diagnosed with oral cancer, and his face is disfigured despite reconstructive surgery after a golf-ball-size tumor was removed from his mouth. He hopes the swelling in his gums will go down so his dentist can fit him with false teeth. "I was one of the lucky ones that had this cancer and survived it," Tuttle said.
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NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curt Schilling blames his oral cancer on 30 years of chewing tobacco. While it is impossible to say for sure in any one person's case, that conclusion by the former Phillies pitcher is certainly plausible, cancer experts say. "I can't taste anything and I can't smell anything," Schilling said this month during a Boston radio telethon, according to MLB.com. Schilling, 47, retired in 2007 after 20 seasons in the major leagues, 81/2 with the Phillies. And he is unlikely to be the last to be affected, despite continued efforts by Major League Baseball to discourage the habit.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day that a movie star says "cancer" and "cunnilingus" to a reporter, so Michael Douglas probably should have known his frankness would become fodder for bloggers, tweeters, and late-night comics. In any case, his revelation last week that his throat cancer was caused by a sexually transmitted virus can serve as a teachable moment - which is what he later said was his aim in the Guardian interview. Human papillomavirus, or HPV, is a family of more than 100 virus types that can live in the flat, thin cells on the surface of the skin, cervix, vagina, anus, vulva, penis, mouth, and throat.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
LIKE A politician who puts his foot in his mouth and then has his "people" try to remove it, Michael Douglas spokesman Allen Burry said Monday that the "Fatal Attraction" star did not blame his throat cancer on oral sex. This came after Douglas spoke with the Guardian newspaper and did blame his cancer on oral sex. Asked about his cancer, Douglas told the Guardian that "without wanting to get too specific, this particular...
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis H. Guernsey Sr., 89, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, died of kidney failure Thursday, Dec. 6, at a care facility in Frederick, Montgomery County, where he had gone for rehabilitation after hospitalization. Dr. Guernsey came to Philadelphia in 1973 and settled in Wayne. Several years ago, he moved to Shannondell, a retirement community in Audubon, Montgomery County. He was an internationally renowned oral surgeon, author, educator, and pioneer of treatments, but his work resonated most with those whose shattered faces he rebuilt after war wounds or other disfigurements.
NEWS
February 18, 2011
It's good to see the boys of summer back on the baseball field. It will be even better if more players take the field without a pinch of chewing tobacco tucked under their lower lips. Sure, that puffed-out jaw of Lenny "Nails" Dykstra will live in the memory of every Phillies' fan who ever watched him tear up the base paths. And ballplayers' chewing habit goes back more than a century, to a time when baseball diamonds were dustier places - and a bit of "dip" helped keep the mouth moist.
NEWS
May 3, 2010 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Diane Allen lay on a gurney at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, she knew she had to learn to let go. She had found the right doctor, the right hospital. She told relatives and close friends she was about to undergo surgery for an aggressive form of oral cancer. Part of her tongue and part of the floor of her mouth were to be removed in that November surgery. Her doctors had told her she probably would never speak normally again. So, the woman who had made a living talking - as a television news reporter and anchor in Philadelphia and Chicago and most recently as a Republican New Jersey state senator - probably would lose one of her greatest assets.
NEWS
April 29, 2010 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Diane Allen (R., Burlington) will return to work on Thursday, ending a six-month hiatus during which she was treated for oral cancer. Allen, 62, of Edgewater Park, said Wednesday that she planned to attend a Women's Legislative Caucus at Rutgers University in New Brunswick. The former television newscaster underwent two surgeries after discovery of a tumor at the base of her tongue. During rehabilitation, she took speech lessons. "They told me I'd never be able to speak normally," Allen said Wednesday in a clear voice during a telephone interview.
SPORTS
July 29, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Roger Clemens had to battle more than just the Texas hitters. Clemens won his eighth straight decision despite pitching with flu symptoms and Jose Canseco hit a two-run double as Toronto beat the visiting Rangers, 8-3, last night to hand the Rangers their fourth straight loss. "I don't know what's up. My temperature has been going up a little crazy," Clemens said. Clemens (13-6) allowed three runs and seven hits in 6 2/3 innings. He walked two and struck out four. The four-time Cy Young winner has allowed seven or fewer hits in 12 of his last 13 starts.
NEWS
November 21, 1994 | BY ANTHONY FAROLE, D.M.D
I would like to shed some light on an ill-advised smoking-cessation strategy you may have read about lately. The strategy recommends that cigarette smokers who are having difficulty quitting switch to smokeless tobacco instead. An article that appeared this summer in the American Journal of Medical Sciences argues that this is a good idea because cigarette smoking is linked to numerous health problems ranging from heart disease to lung cancer, while smokeless tobacco is associated only with an increased risk of oral cancers.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Bill Tuttle was just starting out in baseball with the Detroit Tigers in the early 1950s when, like many other ballplayers, he picked up a chewing tobacco habit. Last year, he was diagnosed with oral cancer, and his face is disfigured despite reconstructive surgery after a golf-ball-size tumor was removed from his mouth. He hopes the swelling in his gums will go down so his dentist can fit him with false teeth. "I was one of the lucky ones that had this cancer and survived it," Tuttle said.
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