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Oral Surgeon

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NEWS
November 10, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James S. Skinner, 84, formerly of Gladwyne, an oral surgeon and community activist who was an advocate for people with mental disabilities, died from complications of Alzheimer's disease Oct. 28 at Sunrise Assisted Living in Lafayette Hill. A native of Easton, Pa., Dr. Skinner graduated from Blair Academy in Blairstown, N.J. During World War II, he attended Ursinus College on a program to train future Navy officers. He remained in the Naval Reserve until 1951. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania Dental School, he completed residencies in oral surgery at Episcopal and Presbyterian Hospitals in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carmen A. Troisi Jr., 81, of Glenside, a retired oral and maxillofacial surgeon, died of cancer Thursday, Dec. 15, at his home. For more than 40 years, Dr. Troisi extracted teeth and performed surgery from offices in Chestnut Hill and on South Broad Street. His patients came from across Southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Dr. Troisi was frequently called upon by the Phillies, Flyers, and Eagles to perform surgery on players, fixing broken jaws and extracting teeth.
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Back in 1984, Irene Tesaura suffered severe injury when an oral surgeon damaged a nerve in her jaw with an injection of alcohol. A Philadelphia Common Pleas jury awarded her $2,747,000. The surgeon, Dr. M.L. Perrige, appealed, claiming the award was "excessive. " The state Superior Court didn't agree. It told Perrige he's going to have to bite the bullet and pay the award. "This jury verdict does not shock our sense of justice," said the appeals court. "The severity of Mrs. Tesauro's injury in itself would support the compensatory award.
NEWS
August 4, 2010 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
All his professional life, Steve Moriconi, an oral surgeon with a private practice in Jenkintown, had wanted to do a medical mission, and the Haitian earthquake was the catalyst for him. He spent a week in Haiti in April. In the little town of Gressier, Moriconi, also director of the dental residency program at Abington Memorial Hospital, found a tumor ballooning in the jaw of a 31-year-old woman and took a tissue sample. But, of course, there was no working lab in the earthquake-ravaged area, so he smuggled the tissue home in his suitcase and sent it to a lab at Temple University.
NEWS
July 17, 1986 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Houston oral surgeon wanted to kill his ex-wife in Manhattan, federal authorities say, so he hired a hit man, paying him $2,000 down on the $20,000 job. What the dentist, who was arrested yesterday in Houston, did not know was that the hit man he hired was an FBI agent from the agency's Bellmawr, Camden County, office, authorities said. The oral surgeon, S. Frederick Pullman, of the 12400 block of Boheme Street in Houston, was held without bail by a federal magistrate. Pullman is being held under a federal murder-for-hire statute enacted in 1984 when the entire federal criminal code was revamped.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | By Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. Milanesi, 79, a pioneer in reconstructive dentistry who practiced 56 years on Torresdale Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia, died of pancreatic cancer Friday at his home in Abington. A man of humor and humanity, Dr. Milanesi loved jazz and opera and golf and books, but it was his work "that was his life expression," according to his daughter, Linda Milanesi. He was still seeing patients as recently as three weeks ago, and to the end, found that his specialty "kept him intellectually challenged and emotionally stimulated," his daughter said.
SPORTS
March 17, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Kelyn Block's reward for leading Indiana State to another of this year's first-round upsets in the NCAA Tournament was an emergency trip to the dentist. The junior had three teeth either knocked out or chipped late in regulation, then found a way to help the 13th-seeded Sycamores (22-11) beat No. 4 Oklahoma, 70-68, in overtime yesterday in the South Regional. Block scored five of his 17 points in overtime after he dramatically returned from the locker room just before the tipoff of the extra period.
SPORTS
February 25, 1996 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Winger Russ Romaniuk underwent surgery yesterday to repair his jaw, which was fractured in Friday's 7-2 loss to Buffalo, and winger Mikael Renberg's strained lower abdominal muscle has not responded well to medication. Both players are sidelined indefinitely. A puck hit the left side of Romaniuk's jaw in the first period against the Sabres, and he did not play the rest of the game. Yesterday morning, Romaniuk was examined by Guy Lanzi, the team's oral surgeon, and was admitted to Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden, where his jaw was wired shut.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | By GINA BOUBION, Daily News Staff Writer
A Philadelphia dentist has been charged with cheating hundreds of poor people under the state Medicaid program by making them pay extra for anesthesia. Dr. Bernard Rothman, 49, of Delancey Place near 21st Street in Center City, was charged with 524 counts of Medicaid fraud in Harrisburg yesterday. Rothman, an oral surgeon, is accused of requiring his poorest patients to pay $15 to $20 a shot for general anesthesia, then billing Medicaid for the treatment. Each count is a felony and carries a maximum penalty of seven years in prison and a $15,000 fine.
SPORTS
September 29, 1995 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Minnesota's Kirby Puckett was hit in the left cheek by a pitch from Dennis Martinez in the first inning of yesterday's 12-4 loss to Cleveland. The 34-year-old Puckett was removed from the game and taken to Fairview- Riverside Hospital in Minneapolis. He was examined by an oral surgeon and an ear-nose-throat specialist. The doctors determined that surgery is not necessary at this time. The outfielder was released last night. Puckett is expected to fully recover in four to six weeks.
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NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Leonard Denbo had known Eugene J. Bass since they were teenagers at Cooper B. Hatch Junior High School in Camden. And one night while they were in college - Denbo at Drexel University, Bass at Temple University - they went out on a double date at a club near the Airport Circle. After the foursome had spent a pleasant evening - especially notable since Denbo was on a blind date - the men were driving home after having dropped off the women. It was then that Bass told Denbo that he had taken a liking to Denbo's blind date.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis H. Guernsey Sr., 89, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, died of kidney failure Thursday, Dec. 6, at a care facility in Frederick, Montgomery County, where he had gone for rehabilitation after hospitalization. Dr. Guernsey came to Philadelphia in 1973 and settled in Wayne. Several years ago, he moved to Shannondell, a retirement community in Audubon, Montgomery County. He was an internationally renowned oral surgeon, author, educator, and pioneer of treatments, but his work resonated most with those whose shattered faces he rebuilt after war wounds or other disfigurements.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carmen A. Troisi Jr., 81, of Glenside, a retired oral and maxillofacial surgeon, died of cancer Thursday, Dec. 15, at his home. For more than 40 years, Dr. Troisi extracted teeth and performed surgery from offices in Chestnut Hill and on South Broad Street. His patients came from across Southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Dr. Troisi was frequently called upon by the Phillies, Flyers, and Eagles to perform surgery on players, fixing broken jaws and extracting teeth.
NEWS
October 8, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter T. Cassalia, 89, of Huntingdon Valley, an oral surgeon and decorated Korean War veteran who once foiled a bank robbery, died of pneumonia Monday, Oct. 4, at Abington Memorial Hospital. After Navy service in the United States during World War II, Dr. Cassalia was called back to duty during the Korean War and served with the Marines in a MASH unit. He was awarded a Bronze Star for heroism during the monthlong Battle of Heartbreak Ridge in 1951. Though he rarely spoke about his experiences, his comrades told his family that he had moved nine wounded men to safety under fire and manned a machine gun during an enemy attack.
NEWS
August 4, 2010 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
All his professional life, Steve Moriconi, an oral surgeon with a private practice in Jenkintown, had wanted to do a medical mission, and the Haitian earthquake was the catalyst for him. He spent a week in Haiti in April. In the little town of Gressier, Moriconi, also director of the dental residency program at Abington Memorial Hospital, found a tumor ballooning in the jaw of a 31-year-old woman and took a tissue sample. But, of course, there was no working lab in the earthquake-ravaged area, so he smuggled the tissue home in his suitcase and sent it to a lab at Temple University.
SPORTS
November 27, 2009 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
76ers point guard Lou Williams underwent surgery yesterday morning to have his jaw wired. Williams will miss eight weeks. Early in the first quarter of Tuesday night's loss to the Washington Wizards, Williams suffered the injury in a collision with Washington forward Antawn Jamison. In that game, he played 39 minutes and scored 26 points. "I was spitting out blood every time-out, but I thought it was my tooth, so I didn't think it was as serious as it was," said Williams, who is averaging 17.4 points and 5.1 assists per game.
NEWS
November 10, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James S. Skinner, 84, formerly of Gladwyne, an oral surgeon and community activist who was an advocate for people with mental disabilities, died from complications of Alzheimer's disease Oct. 28 at Sunrise Assisted Living in Lafayette Hill. A native of Easton, Pa., Dr. Skinner graduated from Blair Academy in Blairstown, N.J. During World War II, he attended Ursinus College on a program to train future Navy officers. He remained in the Naval Reserve until 1951. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania Dental School, he completed residencies in oral surgery at Episcopal and Presbyterian Hospitals in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 24, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although in his long life James L. Larson was an accomplished dentist, civic leader, craftsman and family man, perhaps he will be best remembered for his job of seeing to it that the members of the Flyers didn't lose any more teeth than they had to. Dr. Larson, 76, died June 13 of leiomyosarcoma, a rare soft-tissue cancer, at the Hospice of Lancaster County. For 11 years before his retirement in 1995, he and a friend, oral surgeon Everett Borghesani, were tasked with repairing damage to players' teeth caused by flying pucks, errant hockey sticks, and well-thrown punches.
NEWS
June 16, 2006 | By Stacy Heenan
Have I told you I love you today? My dad used to ask me this every morning before I went off to school. He was handsome, charming, and a true gentleman. Having grown up in the age of free love and rebellion, my dad also was wild and unpredictable. From spontaneous whipped-cream fights to screaming contests at the dinner table, he believed that childhood should be one thing and one thing only: happy. My dad would wake us up at 11 p.m. to catch the midnight showing of the Rocky Horror Picture Show on South Street.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | By Amie Parnes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Bucks County oral surgeon who has had a history of drug abuse now faces new charges of illegally self-prescribing drugs and operating on patients while under the influence, officials said yesterday. Dr. Howard A. Novick, 48, was charged Tuesday with one count of recklessly endangering another person, three months after authorities allegedly caught the 19-year doctor high on a prescription drug, state Attorney General Mike Fisher said. Novick, authorities say, was high on Demerol after he injected himself with the drug 10 times within a 24-hour period.
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