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Orange Crush

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LIVING
October 25, 2002 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It brings to mind traffic cones, Cheetos, and maximum-security prison uniforms. In one national survey, it was the color the country liked least. So why is orange everywhere, even under the kitchen sink? (No, Halloween is not the answer.) Orange is "the hue of optimism and happiness in 2002," said Jay de Sibour, president of the Color Marketing Group, a trade association in Alexandria, Va., that forecasts color trends for major manufacturers. Color Marketing predicted the crush on orange that greeted the turn of the millennium.
SPORTS
October 19, 1987 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer
Linebacker Trey Bauer leaned against a cold, concrete wall near the Penn State locker room, glanced toward the dimly lit, now almost deserted Carrier Dome and said, "It was a general nightmare. " This was the first orange-colored nightmare in the life of Bauer and his Penn State teammates. Earlier Saturday, the sellout crowd of 50,011 was wearing enough orange to overwhelm the colorful fall foliage outside. In the stands, orange sweaters, hats, balloons and pompons were everywhere.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
For the record, I was not scared as I prepared for my first bull ride. The sickening, visceral fear of getting maimed that had tied my stomach into a hard knot hours earlier had, to my surprise, left me. I felt calm as I climbed over the metal bars of the chute and lowered myself onto Orange Crush, who, cooperatively, kept his 1,500-pound bulk still - perhaps in deference, I thought, to his inexperienced rider. I put my gloved hand into the looped rope on Orange Crush's back.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
William H. Bunch's sale of modern collectibles does not really start to live up to its name until nearly two-thirds of the way through the 325 lots that Bunch will offer beginning at noon Monday at his gallery in Chadds Ford. That's when you can bid on 36 lots of pro football figurines and related sports memorabilia from the last half of the 20th century. They range from footballs used in various professional leagues to more than a dozen sets of figures from the Danbury Mint that include the Steel Curtain, Orange Crush and Purple People Eaters.
SPORTS
May 12, 2010
From: Gonzalez, John Are you all Flyer'd up? Do you feel the Orange Crush? . . . Uh . . . hockey is exciting, eh? (That pretty much exhausts my puck clichés.) Went to the bar the other night and was absolutely riveted by the game (seriously). Are the Flyers going to pull out the series? Even with two wins, the odds are seriously against the Flyers, and the mounting injuries don't help. But the Bruins have been vulnerable, and it certainly looked the other night like they were losing the battle between the ears.
SPORTS
October 27, 1989 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
West Philadelphia's Andrew Smith can answer the question, "When does a tie feel like a win?" When you enter with an 0-5 record, having been outscored, 107-28. And when you stop four opposition drives inside your 5-yard line. "Some of the guys were a little down as we left the field, but to me, this is a win," Smith said yesterday, after West played visiting Edward Bok Tech to a scoreless tie in the Public League West. "This sure feels better than the other games. "Each week, we're moving up a level.
SPORTS
May 3, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
In a world that is seldom fair, Bernard Jackson spoke in a clear, steady voice about being stricken with a rare form of liver cancer. An original member of the Orange Crush and the Denver Broncos' starting free safety in Super Bowl XII, Jackson learned of his condition three weeks ago. "Basically, it's not too good," said Jackson, who spent the past two seasons as running backs coach at Western State in Gunnison, Colo. "I started having pains in my right side and night sweats.
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | By Bob Hoffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just three years ago, Woodrow Wilson didn't have enough players to field a varsity girls' basketball team. This coming winter, the Tigers could contend for a South Jersey Group 3 championship. But it hasn't been an easy climb for Tony Coleman, Wilson's fourth-year coach. "We've had some success, but we're still working on the numbers," said Coleman, whose team went 19-7 last winter. "Getting kids into the program is still a problem. We'll have varsity and junior-varsity teams this year, but we're still working on getting a freshman team together.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services and USA Today contributed to this report
LIFE IN THE '90S: Wondering what you're missing by not being, say, a defense-contractor employee with recreational access to the Internet? For one thing, an amusing time-waster like the outraged message an Indiana user sent across the celebrated computer network's sex file recently to over a hundred horny, dimwit users. It started when "Indiana" posted a joke message to Internet file alt.sex.stories about how he'd come up with a "hypnosis program" that could be secretly slipped into another person's computer to make him/her the slipper's mesmerized sexual plaything.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
R.E.M. had fun with its video projector last night at the Spectrum. At one point, the screen read: "It's great to be back in (your town here). " To really get the joke, though, it's helpful to know that this underground- cult-group-turned-unlikely-arena-attraction is traveling with a set lift that's seemingly carved in stone. The fact that the show doesn't include "The One I Love," the 1987 hit that brought R.E.M. to the attention of the mainstream, underscores the studied ambivalence that the group brings to its run at the top. If college were a band, it would be R.E.M.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
William H. Bunch's sale of modern collectibles does not really start to live up to its name until nearly two-thirds of the way through the 325 lots that Bunch will offer beginning at noon Monday at his gallery in Chadds Ford. That's when you can bid on 36 lots of pro football figurines and related sports memorabilia from the last half of the 20th century. They range from footballs used in various professional leagues to more than a dozen sets of figures from the Danbury Mint that include the Steel Curtain, Orange Crush and Purple People Eaters.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA & DAN GERINGER, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
HALLOWEEN CAME either very early or very late to Philadelphia last night. A tsunami of orange and black swept across the city at exactly 9:35 p.m., as the horn sounded at a raucous Wachovia Center to seal the Flyers' 4-2 win over the Montreal Canadiens, and their first trip to the Stanley Cup finals in 13 years. They'll play the Chicago Blackhawks. On a seasonably warm spring night far removed from hockey's frozen-pond origins, the orange crush descended on Frankford and Cottman avenues in the Northeast, outside the sports complex in South Philly, and all party points in between.
SPORTS
May 12, 2010
From: Gonzalez, John Are you all Flyer'd up? Do you feel the Orange Crush? . . . Uh . . . hockey is exciting, eh? (That pretty much exhausts my puck clichés.) Went to the bar the other night and was absolutely riveted by the game (seriously). Are the Flyers going to pull out the series? Even with two wins, the odds are seriously against the Flyers, and the mounting injuries don't help. But the Bruins have been vulnerable, and it certainly looked the other night like they were losing the battle between the ears.
SPORTS
April 26, 2009 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the Flyers, their Eastern Conference playoff series against Pittsburgh went longer than last year's, but was still a frustrating sequel. And, like most sequels, it was painful to watch. Call it The March of Penguins, Part II. The Penguins overcame a 3-0 deficit and shocked the Flyers, 5-3, at the Wachovia Center yesterday and won the conference quarterfinals, four games to two. It was like watching the '64 Phillies' collapse condensed into 35? minutes. Defenseman Sergei Gonchar scored on a slapshot from the top of the right circle with 17 minutes, 41 seconds left to give the Penguins a 4-3 lead.
SPORTS
April 8, 2003 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rangy kid from a hardscrabble section of West Philadelphia whose teammates nicknamed him "Helicopter" because of his springy legs took the flight of his life last night, and when he landed, Syracuse had its first national basketball championship. Hakim Warrick, who had just squandered a chance to clinch the victory, came seemingly from nowhere and blocked a three-point attempt by Kansas' Michael Lee with 1.5 seconds remaining to protect a thrilling 81-78 victory for Syracuse over Kansas in front of 54,524 at the Louisiana Superdome.
LIVING
October 25, 2002 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It brings to mind traffic cones, Cheetos, and maximum-security prison uniforms. In one national survey, it was the color the country liked least. So why is orange everywhere, even under the kitchen sink? (No, Halloween is not the answer.) Orange is "the hue of optimism and happiness in 2002," said Jay de Sibour, president of the Color Marketing Group, a trade association in Alexandria, Va., that forecasts color trends for major manufacturers. Color Marketing predicted the crush on orange that greeted the turn of the millennium.
SPORTS
November 7, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Queen Warrick had a feeling her son would choose to continue his education, basketball and regular, at Syracuse University. "Every time they called," she said, "there was a certain gleam that he'd get. " Mom knew. It's SU. Hakim "Skinny" Warrick, a 6-8, 185-pound (after a big lunch) combination forward at tiny Friends' Central School, last night announced his decision to join the Orangemen. Accompanied by family, friends and assorted community coaches, Warrick revealed his choice at the Mantua Recreation Center, not far from his home near 36th and Fairmount.
SPORTS
August 25, 1997 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Jimmy Hoffa really is buried here under the Giants Stadium turf, he can't be much lower than the matchmakers for the Kickoff Classic are feeling these days. In what is becoming an annoying habit, two college teams came to the swamplands to whet everyone's appetite for the upcoming season and instead provided another strong argument against playing football in August. For the fifth consecutive year, the Kickoff Classic was thoroughly void of drama as No. 17 Syracuse dismantled No. 24 Wisconsin, 34-0, yesterday before 51,185 at Giants Stadium, most of whom were streaming down the exit ramps by the middle of the third quarter.
SPORTS
May 3, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
In a world that is seldom fair, Bernard Jackson spoke in a clear, steady voice about being stricken with a rare form of liver cancer. An original member of the Orange Crush and the Denver Broncos' starting free safety in Super Bowl XII, Jackson learned of his condition three weeks ago. "Basically, it's not too good," said Jackson, who spent the past two seasons as running backs coach at Western State in Gunnison, Colo. "I started having pains in my right side and night sweats.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | By Bob Hoffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Woodrow Wilson brought just seven players to the playoffs of the Cherry Hill Recreation High School League last week at Cherry Hill West. But Wilson's small cast pulled off two big victories. Wilson, competing as Orange Crush, ousted previously undefeated Shawnee (the Tribe), 36-20, in the semifinals before rolling past Gloucester Catholic (ABCs), 47-39, in the final. "The girls really learned a lot this summer," Woodrow Wilson coach Tony Coleman said. "They played well, and they learned that it takes five playing together to win. They hung in there all summer.
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