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NEWS
September 11, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra has satisfied the terms of a major challenge grant, triggering a $10 million gift and pushing the orchestra's campaign for its endowment past the $100 million mark. The orchestra will receive $10 million from the Neubauer Family Foundation - now that the orchestra has raised an additional $10 million from various donors and $10 million from its own board. The Neubauer money puts the total raised for the endowment campaign at $100,800,000. The current goal is $125 million - "though I'd like to see us blow past that," said Julie D?az, the orchestra's vice president of development.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced yesterday that it had received a $3 million challenge grant from the William Penn Foundation, the first gift from a major Philadelphia foundation for the proposed $95 million concert hall. "It's a very significant sign," said Peter Wyeth, director of development for the orchestra. The foundation grant, he said, gave the concert-hall project "the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. " According to a statement by Bernard C. Watson, president of the William Penn Foundation, the grant "reflects our belief that the concert hall project is an extremely important one for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra takes its case to the people tomorrow, beginning a three-week, cross-country, sea-to-sea tour. But despite all the departure hoopla scheduled at Philadelphia International Airport - balloons, a brass quintet playing Sousa marches, and a speech by music director Riccardo Muti - the orchestra will board its plane wondering if this may be the end of a format, the last flight into the sunset, the twilight of a 70-year-old tradition....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The two Kimmel Center resident organizations will combine their operational functions, though each will remain a separate nonprofit entity with their own board of directors. The public may see little change in the near-term, though crossmarketing and cost savings will eventually benefit both organizations. "Only about 6 percent of the audience attends both orchestras, so there is plenty of opportunity," said outgoing orchestra association president Joseph Kluger. "The Pops budget is about $4 million, a tenth of ours, but by combined saving on administration, ticketing, fund-raising and other matters, the number of Pops performances may be able to increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra will perform three neighborhood concerts this summer. Once again, all are free. Continuing a practice that started regularly in 2000, the orchestra will trade its downtown venue for area neighborhoods. This year's concerts will be on Penn's Landing, in Camden's Whitman Park, and at Montgomery County Community College. The program will differ slightly for each concert, but all three will include Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, Bernstein's "Overture" to Candide, and the "Symphonic Dances" from West Side Story.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Our Philadelphia Orchestra has garnered many historic firsts, and tomorrow night adds a cosmic one: the first symphony orchestra represented in space. The occasion is the 100th space shuttle launch, a slick tie-in to the upcoming 100th birthday of the Orchestra Nov. 16. Several weeks ago, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration filmed the Orchestra at the Academy of Music playing the opening bars of Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra," indelibly linked with Stanley Kubrick's film "2001: A Space Odyssey.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Karl Nielsen's symphonies blow through concert halls, their sounds a reminder that late romantic music is not neatly categorized. When Daniel Hege led the Haddonfield Symphony in Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 on Saturday, he was on a voyage of discovery. Certainly the piece is not overplayed, and it was probably being heard for the first time at the Voorhees Schools Theater. Nielsen's melodic ideas sound like poetry read in a not-quite-familiar language. Phrases, whole sections, move with fresh motion, modulate, shift and, in this work, burst into gaiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's first concert after its gala opening always has the air of a grateful return to its real mission. Orchestra and audience meet with high expectations on both sides and with few distractions to jostle those hopes. That was the basis on which the orchestra began its season last night at the Academy of Music. Riccardo Muti was on the podium, and in this beginning program, defined the orchestra's mission as one of pointing out the unifying threads that connect 19th- and 20th-century music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2011 | By David Runk, Associated Press
DETROIT - The Detroit Symphony Orchestra and its striking musicians said Monday that a tentative agreement reached after a weekend of lengthy negotiating sessions could resolve a six-month walkout. The deal, which was reached after a final 10 hours of talks on Sunday, is subject to a ratification vote expected this week, said musicians' spokesman Greg Bowens. If approved, he said, Detroit Federation of Musicians union members with the nationally acclaimed orchestra could be back at work by next weekend.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has been keeping alive the music of composer Vincent Persichetti with greater care since his death than before. James DePreist, in his first concert of the season, conducted the orchestra in Persichetti's Symphony No. 4 last night at the Mann Music Center. It was a good reminder off the composer's range, for this piece is full of bright good spirits and short bursts of melody. The dark, acerbic sounds of some of his other symphonies appear only occasionally in this piece.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra was on much newish ground Thursday with familiar composer names but not familiar pieces, chief among them that woolly bear of a choral work, the Glagolitic Mass of Leos Janacek. I looked forward to seeing the facial reactions of the listeners around me to a piece so singular in the choral literature that you might not know what hit you. The piece is primitivistic yet modern, devotional yet secular, and so impulsive that even seasoned Janacek lovers are hard-pressed to know what comes next.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The program could easily be titled Tortured Beginnings. Khachaturian's Piano Concerto went so badly that the composer was found after the premiere hugging a birch tree while weeping. Rachmaninoff fled from the badly played premiere of his Symphony No. 1 with plugged ears. When both works arrived Wednesday in the Philadelphia Orchestra's Kimmel Center concert, you could understand how awful things happen to such good pieces. Rachmaninoff didn't yet know how best to sequence his musical ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
"GOOD evening and welcome to the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Kimmel Center. At this time, we request you kindly turn your cellphone on . " Believe it or not, that's what concertgoers will be hearing (or words akin) at a series of shows, starting with the Free College Concert Oct. 14, then continuing with subscription concerts Oct. 16-18, as the orchestra introduces "LiveNote," an "interactive concert guide for mobile devices. " Loaded as an application onto an iOS (iPhone)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The purity and severity of a strings-only orchestra sooner or later is a siren call to most classical composers, but an entire program of such works by Orchestra 2001, performed Sunday at Swarthmore's Lang Concert Hall, showed how difficult this high-exposure medium - no winds to soften timbres or brass to add muscle - can be for all concerned. Robert Capanna, Andrew Rudin, Aaron Jay Kernis, and Andrea Clearfield were all represented in "Five Philadelphians" (the fifth is percussionist Angela Zator Nelson)
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
This year, the Philadelphia Orchestra's official opening night - the one that lets you mingle with the maestro at an "exclusive" reception topping out at $2,500 per ticket - doesn't come until a couple of weeks into the season. Actual music-making, though, began in Verizon Hall on Friday night, with no less a gala soloist than Lang Lang. Many listeners in these parts still think of the pianist as an aberrantly eccentric Curtis Institute of Music student, and, for better or worse, in the last decade and a half of his working with every major orchestra and conductor on earth, absolutely nothing has rubbed off on him musically.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 ("Pastoral") is usually about as safe as concert programming can be. Yet when the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia decided to opened its 50th season with Beethoven's celebration of nature and weather Monday at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, it took one of the bigger chances of its recent history. Audiences here aren't used to hearing that music played by 35 or so players. But then, music director (and composer) Sir Dirk Brossé (newly knighted in his native Belgium)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Throughout much of Macy's department store in Center City, "20 percent off" signs added to the celebratory air of Symphony in C's concert on Saturday night, scheduled immediately after closing time, in yet another of its mountain-comes-to-Muhammad collaborations with the fabled Wanamaker organ. Known as one of the biggest and grandest working instruments of its kind, the Wanamaker organ is mostly heard as a musical world unto itself in noontime concerts that range from classical to show tunes.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The first Philadelphia Orchestra principal player to be hired during the tenure of music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin is an old friend of the orchestra. Israeli-born Nitzan Haroz will return to his former chair as principal trombonist effective immediately, the orchestra announced Thursday, four months after he won the audition. Haroz, 45, first came to the orchestra in the Wolfgang Sawallisch era, holding the principal spot from 1995 to 2012, then leaving to become principal of the Los Angeles Philharmonic for two years.
NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months. That's how much time Bob Rosen figured he had left. The Yardley accountant was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, typically a rapidly spreading form of the disease. The doctors advised surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Rosen, 71, began getting his affairs in order. He talked with his son Eric, who would have the responsibility of disbursing his father's $160,000 in charitable donations after Rosen passed away. His father's generous gesture would be executed under heartbreaking circumstances; Eric Rosen dreaded the day. He told his father he had a better thought: Why wait?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Symphony orchestra as jukebox? Such was the idea behind the Philadelphia Orchestra's People's Choice concert on Friday at the Mann Center. Some 16 possibilities posted on radio station WRTI-FM's website were subject to open voting, which yielded a good medium-weight concert of Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Smetana - all classical music greatest hits that, with any luck, gave the audience an increased sense of ownership. Philosophically, it's a fine idea. But having such a concert more than once a year might not be healthy.
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