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NEWS
September 11, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra has satisfied the terms of a major challenge grant, triggering a $10 million gift and pushing the orchestra's campaign for its endowment past the $100 million mark. The orchestra will receive $10 million from the Neubauer Family Foundation - now that the orchestra has raised an additional $10 million from various donors and $10 million from its own board. The Neubauer money puts the total raised for the endowment campaign at $100,800,000. The current goal is $125 million - "though I'd like to see us blow past that," said Julie D?az, the orchestra's vice president of development.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced yesterday that it had received a $3 million challenge grant from the William Penn Foundation, the first gift from a major Philadelphia foundation for the proposed $95 million concert hall. "It's a very significant sign," said Peter Wyeth, director of development for the orchestra. The foundation grant, he said, gave the concert-hall project "the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. " According to a statement by Bernard C. Watson, president of the William Penn Foundation, the grant "reflects our belief that the concert hall project is an extremely important one for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra takes its case to the people tomorrow, beginning a three-week, cross-country, sea-to-sea tour. But despite all the departure hoopla scheduled at Philadelphia International Airport - balloons, a brass quintet playing Sousa marches, and a speech by music director Riccardo Muti - the orchestra will board its plane wondering if this may be the end of a format, the last flight into the sunset, the twilight of a 70-year-old tradition....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The two Kimmel Center resident organizations will combine their operational functions, though each will remain a separate nonprofit entity with their own board of directors. The public may see little change in the near-term, though crossmarketing and cost savings will eventually benefit both organizations. "Only about 6 percent of the audience attends both orchestras, so there is plenty of opportunity," said outgoing orchestra association president Joseph Kluger. "The Pops budget is about $4 million, a tenth of ours, but by combined saving on administration, ticketing, fund-raising and other matters, the number of Pops performances may be able to increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra will perform three neighborhood concerts this summer. Once again, all are free. Continuing a practice that started regularly in 2000, the orchestra will trade its downtown venue for area neighborhoods. This year's concerts will be on Penn's Landing, in Camden's Whitman Park, and at Montgomery County Community College. The program will differ slightly for each concert, but all three will include Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, Bernstein's "Overture" to Candide, and the "Symphonic Dances" from West Side Story.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Our Philadelphia Orchestra has garnered many historic firsts, and tomorrow night adds a cosmic one: the first symphony orchestra represented in space. The occasion is the 100th space shuttle launch, a slick tie-in to the upcoming 100th birthday of the Orchestra Nov. 16. Several weeks ago, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration filmed the Orchestra at the Academy of Music playing the opening bars of Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra," indelibly linked with Stanley Kubrick's film "2001: A Space Odyssey.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Karl Nielsen's symphonies blow through concert halls, their sounds a reminder that late romantic music is not neatly categorized. When Daniel Hege led the Haddonfield Symphony in Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 on Saturday, he was on a voyage of discovery. Certainly the piece is not overplayed, and it was probably being heard for the first time at the Voorhees Schools Theater. Nielsen's melodic ideas sound like poetry read in a not-quite-familiar language. Phrases, whole sections, move with fresh motion, modulate, shift and, in this work, burst into gaiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's first concert after its gala opening always has the air of a grateful return to its real mission. Orchestra and audience meet with high expectations on both sides and with few distractions to jostle those hopes. That was the basis on which the orchestra began its season last night at the Academy of Music. Riccardo Muti was on the podium, and in this beginning program, defined the orchestra's mission as one of pointing out the unifying threads that connect 19th- and 20th-century music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2011 | By David Runk, Associated Press
DETROIT - The Detroit Symphony Orchestra and its striking musicians said Monday that a tentative agreement reached after a weekend of lengthy negotiating sessions could resolve a six-month walkout. The deal, which was reached after a final 10 hours of talks on Sunday, is subject to a ratification vote expected this week, said musicians' spokesman Greg Bowens. If approved, he said, Detroit Federation of Musicians union members with the nationally acclaimed orchestra could be back at work by next weekend.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has been keeping alive the music of composer Vincent Persichetti with greater care since his death than before. James DePreist, in his first concert of the season, conducted the orchestra in Persichetti's Symphony No. 4 last night at the Mann Music Center. It was a good reminder off the composer's range, for this piece is full of bright good spirits and short bursts of melody. The dark, acerbic sounds of some of his other symphonies appear only occasionally in this piece.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
There was, at dusk Wednesday, a persistently utopian dreamlike aura that could be felt settling over Pastorius Park. A leisurely crowd of several hundred gathered on the sloping lawn that led down to a still, diminutive moat and a group of string players playing Mozart just beyond. The park's amphitheater is without a doubt one of the great tucked-away charms of tucked-away Chestnut Hill. This is the 68th year of summer concerts in the suburban - if sylvan - enclave, and Wednesday came with some history.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
How can Yannick hold both jobs at once? What makes him a good fit for the job? Will he stay committed to Philadelphia? Consolidating his young but flowering career, Yannick Nézet-Séguin will assume the podium of the Metropolitan Opera in New York while remaining music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Nézet-Séguin, 41, will phase in his Met duties gradually, becoming music director-designate in the 2017-18 season with two productions, and music director in 2020-21 leading five, the opera company announced Thursday.
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Three new works, a hot young Slovenian violinist, plus Mozart's Symphony No. 35 could have, would have, and should have added up to an impressive season finale for the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia Sunday at the Kimmel Center. But they didn't quite. This is the year music director Dirk Brossé emerged from the more constricted repertoire of past administrations. But the new-music programming, however attractive, didn't come close to holding its own alongside the established works.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
When the Chinese economy took a southward turn at the start of 2016, Philadelphia Orchestra watchers had to pause. The orchestra has invested heavily in relationships throughout China in recent years - were these ties now in jeopardy? Any hand-wringing seems to have evolved into a why-worry shrug as the orchestra embarks on its 2016 Tour of Asia. It starts with a pair of Hong Kong concerts May 19 and 20 that will be broadcast live by WRTI-FM - the first visits there since 2005 - followed by dates in Macau, Shanghai, Beijing, and then Japan.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
NEW YORK - Speculation over Yannick Nézet-Séguin's appointment to the Metropolitan Opera continues to rage - but you wouldn't suspect that amid the nonchalant Carnegie Hall crowd at the Philadelphia Orchestra's final concert of its season here. Usually the orchestra plays Carnegie Hall at the end of a subscription series. Wednesday's concert, though, preceded the same program Thursday through Saturday at the Kimmel Center. Though not at its most polished, the orchestra delivered a program of Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 1 with Lang Lang and the Mahler Symphony No. 10 that was greeted with considerable receptivity, though at nearly 21/2 hours, the concert had listeners leaving to catch their trains the minute the symphony ended.
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra's two-week John Williams festival ideally balanced the two lives of this hugely well-known, oft-awarded composer - and left you feeling that you knew the personality behind the music. Principal guest conductor Stéphane Denève integrated two Williams concertos into regular subscription concerts - showing how much they do belong there, especially with the deluxe treatment that came with the likes of James Ehnes, who played the Williams Violin Concerto at Thursday at the Kimmel Center with the insights and commitment he brings to better-known repertoire.
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Somehow the words love fest don't cover it. Wednesday's one-night-only concert of John Williams film music by the Philadelphia Orchestra as part of its two-week Williams celebration was bound to be good box office, with an audience exuding good will accumulated from the many popular Stephen Spielberg films that he has scored. But what unfolded at the Kimmel Center was beyond what could have been anticipated. Planned to be two hours long, it went an for an extra half hour, with three encores led by the composer himself, who shared the conducting podium with Stéphane Denève, prompting some of the longest and loudest ovations I've heard at the Kimmel Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
If John Williams is an alien presence on traditional symphonic programs, his concertos and overtures are like the friendly UFOs visiting Earth in Close Encounters of the Third Kind : They may not entirely fit in, but that's what makes their presence interesting. The composer has been the consistent musical voice of filmmaker Steven Spielberg for more than 40 years, an association that accounts for many of his 50 Oscar nominations and 22 Grammy Awards. For just as long, though, Williams has been writing classical concert works with an increasing assurance that's likely to be apparent in the Philadelphia Orchestra's John Williams mini-festival, which takes place over the next two weeks at the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Q uestion: I recently attended a concert held in a local church. The event was so crowded that we sat in the balcony and happened to be behind a couple who were probably in their 30s. Despite the fact that members of the Philadelphia Orchestra were performing and there were incredible professional singers, these two spent the entire time playing games on their phones. They never stopped and, sitting behind them, it was extremely distracting. Should I have said something to them? Were they being rude?
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
It's OK to show up at a Philadelphia Orchestra concert this season and feel conflicted that big plans never materialized. The Stravinsky Soldier's Tale in a staged version by James Alexander, announced for the current run of concerts, was a victim of this season's budget cuts, and so the program was reworked without actors and dancers. The orchestra's current leadership feels that visuals are a good way to lure more listeners to the sound. Maybe. And though the orchestra has staged The Soldier's Tale before - in an elegant 2006 family-concert production by director Susan Fenichell - it was tantalizing to consider what Alexander (who has staged the St. Matthew Passion here)
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