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NEWS
September 11, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra has satisfied the terms of a major challenge grant, triggering a $10 million gift and pushing the orchestra's campaign for its endowment past the $100 million mark. The orchestra will receive $10 million from the Neubauer Family Foundation - now that the orchestra has raised an additional $10 million from various donors and $10 million from its own board. The Neubauer money puts the total raised for the endowment campaign at $100,800,000. The current goal is $125 million - "though I'd like to see us blow past that," said Julie D?az, the orchestra's vice president of development.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced yesterday that it had received a $3 million challenge grant from the William Penn Foundation, the first gift from a major Philadelphia foundation for the proposed $95 million concert hall. "It's a very significant sign," said Peter Wyeth, director of development for the orchestra. The foundation grant, he said, gave the concert-hall project "the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. " According to a statement by Bernard C. Watson, president of the William Penn Foundation, the grant "reflects our belief that the concert hall project is an extremely important one for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra takes its case to the people tomorrow, beginning a three-week, cross-country, sea-to-sea tour. But despite all the departure hoopla scheduled at Philadelphia International Airport - balloons, a brass quintet playing Sousa marches, and a speech by music director Riccardo Muti - the orchestra will board its plane wondering if this may be the end of a format, the last flight into the sunset, the twilight of a 70-year-old tradition....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The two Kimmel Center resident organizations will combine their operational functions, though each will remain a separate nonprofit entity with their own board of directors. The public may see little change in the near-term, though crossmarketing and cost savings will eventually benefit both organizations. "Only about 6 percent of the audience attends both orchestras, so there is plenty of opportunity," said outgoing orchestra association president Joseph Kluger. "The Pops budget is about $4 million, a tenth of ours, but by combined saving on administration, ticketing, fund-raising and other matters, the number of Pops performances may be able to increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra will perform three neighborhood concerts this summer. Once again, all are free. Continuing a practice that started regularly in 2000, the orchestra will trade its downtown venue for area neighborhoods. This year's concerts will be on Penn's Landing, in Camden's Whitman Park, and at Montgomery County Community College. The program will differ slightly for each concert, but all three will include Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, Bernstein's "Overture" to Candide, and the "Symphonic Dances" from West Side Story.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Our Philadelphia Orchestra has garnered many historic firsts, and tomorrow night adds a cosmic one: the first symphony orchestra represented in space. The occasion is the 100th space shuttle launch, a slick tie-in to the upcoming 100th birthday of the Orchestra Nov. 16. Several weeks ago, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration filmed the Orchestra at the Academy of Music playing the opening bars of Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra," indelibly linked with Stanley Kubrick's film "2001: A Space Odyssey.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Karl Nielsen's symphonies blow through concert halls, their sounds a reminder that late romantic music is not neatly categorized. When Daniel Hege led the Haddonfield Symphony in Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 on Saturday, he was on a voyage of discovery. Certainly the piece is not overplayed, and it was probably being heard for the first time at the Voorhees Schools Theater. Nielsen's melodic ideas sound like poetry read in a not-quite-familiar language. Phrases, whole sections, move with fresh motion, modulate, shift and, in this work, burst into gaiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's first concert after its gala opening always has the air of a grateful return to its real mission. Orchestra and audience meet with high expectations on both sides and with few distractions to jostle those hopes. That was the basis on which the orchestra began its season last night at the Academy of Music. Riccardo Muti was on the podium, and in this beginning program, defined the orchestra's mission as one of pointing out the unifying threads that connect 19th- and 20th-century music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2011 | By David Runk, Associated Press
DETROIT - The Detroit Symphony Orchestra and its striking musicians said Monday that a tentative agreement reached after a weekend of lengthy negotiating sessions could resolve a six-month walkout. The deal, which was reached after a final 10 hours of talks on Sunday, is subject to a ratification vote expected this week, said musicians' spokesman Greg Bowens. If approved, he said, Detroit Federation of Musicians union members with the nationally acclaimed orchestra could be back at work by next weekend.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has been keeping alive the music of composer Vincent Persichetti with greater care since his death than before. James DePreist, in his first concert of the season, conducted the orchestra in Persichetti's Symphony No. 4 last night at the Mann Music Center. It was a good reminder off the composer's range, for this piece is full of bright good spirits and short bursts of melody. The dark, acerbic sounds of some of his other symphonies appear only occasionally in this piece.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In the first minute or so of Webern's Im Sommerwind , the Philadelphia Orchestra produced such a gentle, otherworldly glow, you couldn't help feeling you had heard the most beautiful sound of the concert. The celebrated pianist Leif Ove Andsnes then played the Schumann Piano Concerto - though fitfully. After intermission came Brahms (his comfortable Symphony No. 2 ). Music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin captured that work's combination of candid emotions and formal rigor, which has eluded in the past, but not Thursday.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Yannick Nézet-Séguin's fifth season as Philadelphia Orchestra music director might not immediately look that different from the previous four. In some ways, that's intentional. Nézet-Séguin has often talked about the advantage in creating a familylike circle of performers - such as Karen Cargill, who was memorably featured in this season's Messiah and who will be back in May 2017 for the Mahler Symphony No. 3 . Certain composers don't stay away long: Now that Nézet-Séguin has conducted all of Rachmaninoff's symphonies, guest conductor Stéphane Denève will cover the composer's piano/orchestral works over three separate concerts April 27-29, 2017.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced its 2016-17 subscription season Tuesday at the Kimmel Center. Usual classical music suspects like Brahms, Mahler, and Rachmaninoff will be joined by 21st-century electronics by Mason Bates, a new organ concerto by Pulitzer Prize-winner Christopher Rouse, and a screening of the movie E.T. with a live performance of the John Williams score. Among performers in the orchestra's 117th season, past visitors such as Simon Rattle and conductor laureate Charles Dutoit will return, and celebrated 22-year-old Canadian cellist Stephen Tetreault will make his debut.
NEWS
January 18, 2016
Early one morning, David Bowie opened the gate and went out into the big world of orchestral music, and, in a single half-hour recording, bagged a triumph. Bowie's narration of Peter and the Wolf with the Philadelphia Orchestra released in 1978 hardly represents the first or last handshake over this piece between classical long-hairs and pop stars. In hopes of finding a larger following, classical music often has looked to Prokofiev's 1936 work, inviting pop culture, show business, and political names of the day to do the narration.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Some programs in the Philadelphia Orchestra's three-week Music of Vienna Festival could have happened anywhere in the season. But Wednesday night's program at the Kimmel Center was much more adventurous than that. With engaging recklessness, the concert was designed to show Vienna as a center for music both great and silly. Music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin's program was bookended by waltz king Johann Strauss, with Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4 and two piggyback works: Gustav Mahler's orchestral transcription of Beethoven's String Quartet No. 11 Op. 95 ("Serioso")
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
For Philadelphia Orchestra principal trumpeter David Bilger, the chance to help arrived as a friend request. AhmadBaset Azizi approached Bilger on Facebook about a year and a half ago with an intriguing overture: Could he study with Bilger - via video, online, from Afghanistan? Bilger agreed. It turns out that the 17-year-old Kabul musician has been making contacts all over the world, and now his drive and winsome way are paying off. Azizi will spend his last year of high school in northwest Michigan, at the well-regarded Interlochen Arts Academy, starting this fall - if money can be found.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Any Philadelphia Orchestra program of Russian chestnuts - the sort many classical music people have known since childhood - demands aggressively distinctive performances. And between guest conductor Fabio Luisi and violinist Christian Tetzlaff, such feats were accomplished Thursday at the Kimmel Center to varying degrees, sometimes brilliantly. Glinka's Ruslan and Lyudmila overture is often an entry-level classic: The piece's hectic velocity is great fun. Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto enshrines young, ardent emotions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Fabio Luisi and Christian Tetzlaff perform Tchaikovsky on Thursday through Saturday at the Kimmel Center. Information: 215-893-1999 or www.philorch.org .
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2016 | David Patrick Stearns, Staff Writer
At some point during an extended encounter with Philadelphia Orchestra guest conductor Fabio Luisi, you can't help comparing your socks with his - and wondering what that means. A studious, scholarly presence, the 56-year-old Luisi is probably the most soft-spoken person backstage at the Metropolitan Opera, where he is principal conductor and preparing for a revival of two of the noisier Italian operas in the repertoire, the blood-and-guts pair of I Pagliacci and Cavalleria Rusticana.
NEWS
December 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'How about one more movement?" Philadelphia Orchestra music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin couldn't resist making that faux-casual suggestion when the Friday audience erupted into full applause after three out of four movements in Henri Vieuxtemps' Violin Concerto No. 4 . The audience lapse was understandable: This concerto rarely turns up in the United States, and guest violinist Hilary Hahn automatically gets points for taking a...
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