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NEWS
September 11, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra has satisfied the terms of a major challenge grant, triggering a $10 million gift and pushing the orchestra's campaign for its endowment past the $100 million mark. The orchestra will receive $10 million from the Neubauer Family Foundation - now that the orchestra has raised an additional $10 million from various donors and $10 million from its own board. The Neubauer money puts the total raised for the endowment campaign at $100,800,000. The current goal is $125 million - "though I'd like to see us blow past that," said Julie D?az, the orchestra's vice president of development.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced yesterday that it had received a $3 million challenge grant from the William Penn Foundation, the first gift from a major Philadelphia foundation for the proposed $95 million concert hall. "It's a very significant sign," said Peter Wyeth, director of development for the orchestra. The foundation grant, he said, gave the concert-hall project "the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. " According to a statement by Bernard C. Watson, president of the William Penn Foundation, the grant "reflects our belief that the concert hall project is an extremely important one for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra takes its case to the people tomorrow, beginning a three-week, cross-country, sea-to-sea tour. But despite all the departure hoopla scheduled at Philadelphia International Airport - balloons, a brass quintet playing Sousa marches, and a speech by music director Riccardo Muti - the orchestra will board its plane wondering if this may be the end of a format, the last flight into the sunset, the twilight of a 70-year-old tradition....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The two Kimmel Center resident organizations will combine their operational functions, though each will remain a separate nonprofit entity with their own board of directors. The public may see little change in the near-term, though crossmarketing and cost savings will eventually benefit both organizations. "Only about 6 percent of the audience attends both orchestras, so there is plenty of opportunity," said outgoing orchestra association president Joseph Kluger. "The Pops budget is about $4 million, a tenth of ours, but by combined saving on administration, ticketing, fund-raising and other matters, the number of Pops performances may be able to increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra will perform three neighborhood concerts this summer. Once again, all are free. Continuing a practice that started regularly in 2000, the orchestra will trade its downtown venue for area neighborhoods. This year's concerts will be on Penn's Landing, in Camden's Whitman Park, and at Montgomery County Community College. The program will differ slightly for each concert, but all three will include Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, Bernstein's "Overture" to Candide, and the "Symphonic Dances" from West Side Story.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Our Philadelphia Orchestra has garnered many historic firsts, and tomorrow night adds a cosmic one: the first symphony orchestra represented in space. The occasion is the 100th space shuttle launch, a slick tie-in to the upcoming 100th birthday of the Orchestra Nov. 16. Several weeks ago, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration filmed the Orchestra at the Academy of Music playing the opening bars of Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra," indelibly linked with Stanley Kubrick's film "2001: A Space Odyssey.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Karl Nielsen's symphonies blow through concert halls, their sounds a reminder that late romantic music is not neatly categorized. When Daniel Hege led the Haddonfield Symphony in Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 on Saturday, he was on a voyage of discovery. Certainly the piece is not overplayed, and it was probably being heard for the first time at the Voorhees Schools Theater. Nielsen's melodic ideas sound like poetry read in a not-quite-familiar language. Phrases, whole sections, move with fresh motion, modulate, shift and, in this work, burst into gaiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's first concert after its gala opening always has the air of a grateful return to its real mission. Orchestra and audience meet with high expectations on both sides and with few distractions to jostle those hopes. That was the basis on which the orchestra began its season last night at the Academy of Music. Riccardo Muti was on the podium, and in this beginning program, defined the orchestra's mission as one of pointing out the unifying threads that connect 19th- and 20th-century music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2011 | By David Runk, Associated Press
DETROIT - The Detroit Symphony Orchestra and its striking musicians said Monday that a tentative agreement reached after a weekend of lengthy negotiating sessions could resolve a six-month walkout. The deal, which was reached after a final 10 hours of talks on Sunday, is subject to a ratification vote expected this week, said musicians' spokesman Greg Bowens. If approved, he said, Detroit Federation of Musicians union members with the nationally acclaimed orchestra could be back at work by next weekend.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has been keeping alive the music of composer Vincent Persichetti with greater care since his death than before. James DePreist, in his first concert of the season, conducted the orchestra in Persichetti's Symphony No. 4 last night at the Mann Music Center. It was a good reminder off the composer's range, for this piece is full of bright good spirits and short bursts of melody. The dark, acerbic sounds of some of his other symphonies appear only occasionally in this piece.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though choice of soloists is often an important component of Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia's sense of alternative symphonic experiences, previously unknown guest conducting talents can feel like an even more welcoming ambush. Sunday's headliner at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater ostensibly was Sean Chen, a young pianist who has placed well in competitions (the Van Cliburn, for one) and is a nominee for a 2015 Leonore Annenberg arts fellowship award at Penn. But the concert started with Haydn's little-known overture to the opera Armida , conducted by the lesser-known Nir Kabaretti with a solidity not heard consistently since Ignat Solzhenitsyn's departure and, more than that, a distinctive, glistening personality.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If, in the classical realm, technical mastery long ago became the norm, and if, more recently, greatness is as easily accessed as a YouTube search, what do we hope to glean from the live concert experience? Why go at all? A smart curatorial hand assembling the weekend's artists and repertoire at the Philadelphia Orchestra affirmed the value of surprise. Saturday night in Verizon Hall could not have looked more unassuming on paper: a long-established violinist in a warhorse. But Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg made Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E Minor into such a complete personal statement it left the impression it might never happen again (Sunday's repeat performance, broadcast live on WRTI-FM, came close)
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service and concert have been set to honor former Philadelphia Orchestra principal cellist William Stokking, 81, of Medford. The service is to be at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 12, at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 401 Kings Highway N., Cherry Hill. The concert is to be at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 9, at Field Concert Hall of the Curtis Institute of Music, 1726 Locust St. His wife, Nancy, said both events are open to the public. Mr. Stokking, who retired from the orchestra in 2005, died Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014, at a Moorestown nursing home of complications from a stroke.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Beethoven and Falla. Only one conductor would dare to pair such radically dissimilar composers with the Philadelphia Orchestra: the late Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos. Planned by him before his death last year, the program on Thursday fell to the orchestra's conductor in residence, Cristian Macelaru. He is as strong-minded as anyone standing before the orchestra this season and, overall, made the evening work in a manner hugely different from Frühbeck de Burgos'. Beethoven was represented by his least severe orchestral work, the Symphony No. 6 ("Pastoral")
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
For all of its reputed fabulousness, the Philadelphia Orchestra is also known for its winter contingency concerts. Most famously, Wolfgang Sawallisch once played Wagner on piano while weather-delayed orchestra musicians trickled in. On Thursday, music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin could not muster enough musicians for Vaughan Williams' Symphony No. 4 , so he substituted Ravel's Mother Goose Suite on four-hand piano with himself and none...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The world is impossible to imagine without Mahler's Symphony No. 4 , though its well-deserved ubiquity didn't stop Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia from indulging in amiably quixotic time travel back to when Mahler approved a parlor-size reduction, perhaps because options for hearing the large-orchestra version were limited. The 12-musician version - not counting the conductor or vocal soloists in the final movement - was made by Arnold Schoenberg's student Erwin Stein for strings, winds, percussion, piano, and harmonium - in a program that included a 14-string version of Schoenberg's challenging Verklarte Nacht . The concert was pleasing and never embarrassing (as the Mahler could have been)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Has Ligeti's Atmosphères lost some of its shock value in the decades since its use in 2001: A Space Odyssey ? Maybe not. Amid our current orchestral odyssey of making programs as obsequious as possible, the classic from 1961 is regaining ground as a stroke of wondrous impertinence. British conductor Robin Ticciati made it so Friday night, even while constructing a Philadelphia Orchestra program in Verizon Hall of sly interplay among pieces. Another conductor might have aped the film, pairing it with Also sprach Zarathustra . Ticciati instead connected this Ligeti with an antecedent: Wagner.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
A violin career that began when she was 3, playing "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" at home outside of Seoul, South Korea, has led a Chester County teenager to deliver award-winning classical performances at venues in Florida, California, Ohio, North Carolina - and Romania. On Sunday, Sein An is set to perform in Bryn Athyn. An, 17, of West Chester, said her success is the result of early support by her musical family. "I could actually make people happy by playing that little song," An said.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
With a couple of inches of fresh snow on the ground, Tuesday must not have felt much like Mardi Gras to Irvin Mayfield. But the trumpeter/bandleader did his best to bring the warmth of his native New Orleans to the Kimmel Center, with a raucous performance that was equal parts traditional and irreverent. Mayfield follows in the footsteps of fellow New Orleanian Wynton Marsalis in his efforts to marry jazz performance with education and outreach. The 37-year-old established the New Orleans Jazz Institute at the University of New Orleans in 2008, has opened two venues in the city, and was named by President Obama to the National Council on the Arts.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Conductor Valery Gergiev probably had one of the more civilized receptions of his winter U.S. tour at Thursday's Philadelphia Orchestra concert. Pro-Ukrainian protesters were outside the Kimmel Center, having their say in the ongoing debate about Gergiev's support of Russian president Vladimir Putin, and inside, the concert was business as usual - as much as Gergiev's concerts are ever typical. He has long been the master of spontaneous combustion. Although Gergiev's own Mariinsky Orchestra often plays with world-class inspiration, it's sonically compromised by the substandard quality of instruments.
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