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NEWS
September 11, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra has satisfied the terms of a major challenge grant, triggering a $10 million gift and pushing the orchestra's campaign for its endowment past the $100 million mark. The orchestra will receive $10 million from the Neubauer Family Foundation - now that the orchestra has raised an additional $10 million from various donors and $10 million from its own board. The Neubauer money puts the total raised for the endowment campaign at $100,800,000. The current goal is $125 million - "though I'd like to see us blow past that," said Julie D?az, the orchestra's vice president of development.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced yesterday that it had received a $3 million challenge grant from the William Penn Foundation, the first gift from a major Philadelphia foundation for the proposed $95 million concert hall. "It's a very significant sign," said Peter Wyeth, director of development for the orchestra. The foundation grant, he said, gave the concert-hall project "the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. " According to a statement by Bernard C. Watson, president of the William Penn Foundation, the grant "reflects our belief that the concert hall project is an extremely important one for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra takes its case to the people tomorrow, beginning a three-week, cross-country, sea-to-sea tour. But despite all the departure hoopla scheduled at Philadelphia International Airport - balloons, a brass quintet playing Sousa marches, and a speech by music director Riccardo Muti - the orchestra will board its plane wondering if this may be the end of a format, the last flight into the sunset, the twilight of a 70-year-old tradition....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The two Kimmel Center resident organizations will combine their operational functions, though each will remain a separate nonprofit entity with their own board of directors. The public may see little change in the near-term, though crossmarketing and cost savings will eventually benefit both organizations. "Only about 6 percent of the audience attends both orchestras, so there is plenty of opportunity," said outgoing orchestra association president Joseph Kluger. "The Pops budget is about $4 million, a tenth of ours, but by combined saving on administration, ticketing, fund-raising and other matters, the number of Pops performances may be able to increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra will perform three neighborhood concerts this summer. Once again, all are free. Continuing a practice that started regularly in 2000, the orchestra will trade its downtown venue for area neighborhoods. This year's concerts will be on Penn's Landing, in Camden's Whitman Park, and at Montgomery County Community College. The program will differ slightly for each concert, but all three will include Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, Bernstein's "Overture" to Candide, and the "Symphonic Dances" from West Side Story.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Our Philadelphia Orchestra has garnered many historic firsts, and tomorrow night adds a cosmic one: the first symphony orchestra represented in space. The occasion is the 100th space shuttle launch, a slick tie-in to the upcoming 100th birthday of the Orchestra Nov. 16. Several weeks ago, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration filmed the Orchestra at the Academy of Music playing the opening bars of Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra," indelibly linked with Stanley Kubrick's film "2001: A Space Odyssey.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Karl Nielsen's symphonies blow through concert halls, their sounds a reminder that late romantic music is not neatly categorized. When Daniel Hege led the Haddonfield Symphony in Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 on Saturday, he was on a voyage of discovery. Certainly the piece is not overplayed, and it was probably being heard for the first time at the Voorhees Schools Theater. Nielsen's melodic ideas sound like poetry read in a not-quite-familiar language. Phrases, whole sections, move with fresh motion, modulate, shift and, in this work, burst into gaiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's first concert after its gala opening always has the air of a grateful return to its real mission. Orchestra and audience meet with high expectations on both sides and with few distractions to jostle those hopes. That was the basis on which the orchestra began its season last night at the Academy of Music. Riccardo Muti was on the podium, and in this beginning program, defined the orchestra's mission as one of pointing out the unifying threads that connect 19th- and 20th-century music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2011 | By David Runk, Associated Press
DETROIT - The Detroit Symphony Orchestra and its striking musicians said Monday that a tentative agreement reached after a weekend of lengthy negotiating sessions could resolve a six-month walkout. The deal, which was reached after a final 10 hours of talks on Sunday, is subject to a ratification vote expected this week, said musicians' spokesman Greg Bowens. If approved, he said, Detroit Federation of Musicians union members with the nationally acclaimed orchestra could be back at work by next weekend.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has been keeping alive the music of composer Vincent Persichetti with greater care since his death than before. James DePreist, in his first concert of the season, conducted the orchestra in Persichetti's Symphony No. 4 last night at the Mann Music Center. It was a good reminder off the composer's range, for this piece is full of bright good spirits and short bursts of melody. The dark, acerbic sounds of some of his other symphonies appear only occasionally in this piece.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The personality of the screen composer is often a baffling mystery. From André Previn to John Williams to Howard Shore, the music might be dashingly sexy, inspired with fevered religiosity, or shrouded in enigmas - and completely unlike the composers who created it. The amiable, low-key Shore wouldn't seem to fit in with the myth-steeped screen characters for whom he has so memorably written in the Lord of the Rings series. That will be celebrated in a special concert screening of the film The Fellowship of the Ring , accompanied live by the Philadelphia Orchestra and Mendelssohn Club, at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seth MacFarlane is known for his vocal prowess, especially when it takes the form of an intelligent talking dog, a pot-smoking bear, or an evil baby. But MacFarlane, creator and voice of many of the characters on Family Guy and American Dad , and director and star of this summer's Ted 2 , has a hobby: singing selections from the Great American Songbook. On Saturday, MacFarlane will be joined by the Baltimore Symphony to sing his favorite standards. He's coming straight off his press tour for Ted 2 . In August comes Blunt Talk , the new Starz series he executive produced, written by Jonathan Ames (HBO's Bored to Death )
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In an extension of its already numerous outreach activities, the Philadelphia Orchestra announced a new partnership Thursday with Carnegie Hall's second youth orchestra, to be formed in 2016. Having already formed the National Youth Orchestra of the USA (NYO-USA) in 2013 for musicians ages 16 to 19, Carnegie Hall is now founding the 80-piece NYO2 for students 14 to 17 who "have been traditionally underserved by local music programs," according to a statement it released. As many as "several dozen" Philadelphia musicians will act as both as coaches and side-by-side players, said Philadelphia Orchestra president and CEO Allison Vulgamore.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra, which knows the way to London and Vienna, could use a little help these days finding the neighborhoods of the city in which it lives. In 15 years, the orchestra's wonderful free neighborhood concert series has brought it to North Philadelphia, the Navy Yard, Drexel Hill, and elsewhere. This year, the series consists of two concerts, and you might notice that the next one, July 30, has the intrepid Philadelphians venturing all the way to, well, their usual perch in Verizon Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The hard-core classical lover isn't exactly settling when he goes to hear an entire evening of Gershwin. As a melodist, Gershwin is right up there with Schubert. It is especially true that when orchestrated, and orchestrated well, his songs strike a particular vein in the American spirit that is more breathlessly optimistic than Irving Berlin, more urbane than Copland, and yet retains its sincerity to the tender core. The Philadelphia Orchestra and conductor Cristian Macelaru could not have picked a better banner for these ideals than the opener to Friday night's concert at the Mann Center.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
It was an offer you couldn't refuse: a classic film, a great score, a great classical orchestra. There was much to like about the Philadelphia Orchestra's Thursday-night performance at the Mann Center of Nino Rota's score beneath a vivid screen showing The Godfather . There is also something of a feeling of treading water on these movie nights. In terms of developing audiences for classical music, the trend of pairing live orchestras with film likely will have little to show for it in the end. Still, it feels like justice to those of us who believe that as much art lies in that quivering line off to the side of the celluloid as in the main frame.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROME - Finding an opening act for the pope is no easy task. Organizers of Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia announced Tuesday that the renowned Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli and the Colombian pop star Juanes, along with the Philadelphia Orchestra, will headline the Saturday free concert on the eve of Pope Francis' Mass on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in September. The pope - and as many as 1.5 million people - are expected to attend the Festival of Families performance on the last night of the World Meeting of Families, the Catholic Church's huge faith-and-families congress that week.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HE WAS A South Philly kid who made good. Joseph de Pasquale set new standards for the viola, playing for the Boston Symphony and, more famously, for the Philadelphia Orchestra in a career of performing and teaching that began at age 15 and ended with his retirement in 1996. He died yesterday at the age of 95. He lived in Merion Station. Joseph and his brothers, three of whom would comprise the world-renowned De Pasquale String Quartet, were born in South Philadelphia with the sound of classical music ringing in their heads.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
LONDON - The Philadelphia Orchestra's Europe 2015 tour can't be just about long ovations, great reviews, and full houses, because few if any tours are going to have those consistently. In Amsterdam on Thursday, Nico Muhly's new Mixed Messages got a chilly reception. In Berlin on May 26, music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin "whirled about but clarified nothing" in Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 3 , according to Ulrich Amling in Der Tagesspiegel. And at London's Royal Festival Hall on Friday, the first of two concerts there was only 60 percent full.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
AMSTERDAM - With its six tons of equipment, the Philadelphia Orchestra arrived for its Amsterdam concert on Thursday with success or failure dependent on one key person: not any musician, but an anonymous truck driver who maneuvered through streets the size of bike lanes to deliver the instruments to one of Europe's most majestic but problematic halls, the Royal Concertgebouw. "If Yannick [Nézet-Séguin] couldn't conduct the concert, Lio Kuokman would fill in. If a player gets sick, we have alternates.
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