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NEWS
September 11, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra has satisfied the terms of a major challenge grant, triggering a $10 million gift and pushing the orchestra's campaign for its endowment past the $100 million mark. The orchestra will receive $10 million from the Neubauer Family Foundation - now that the orchestra has raised an additional $10 million from various donors and $10 million from its own board. The Neubauer money puts the total raised for the endowment campaign at $100,800,000. The current goal is $125 million - "though I'd like to see us blow past that," said Julie D?az, the orchestra's vice president of development.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced yesterday that it had received a $3 million challenge grant from the William Penn Foundation, the first gift from a major Philadelphia foundation for the proposed $95 million concert hall. "It's a very significant sign," said Peter Wyeth, director of development for the orchestra. The foundation grant, he said, gave the concert-hall project "the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. " According to a statement by Bernard C. Watson, president of the William Penn Foundation, the grant "reflects our belief that the concert hall project is an extremely important one for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra takes its case to the people tomorrow, beginning a three-week, cross-country, sea-to-sea tour. But despite all the departure hoopla scheduled at Philadelphia International Airport - balloons, a brass quintet playing Sousa marches, and a speech by music director Riccardo Muti - the orchestra will board its plane wondering if this may be the end of a format, the last flight into the sunset, the twilight of a 70-year-old tradition....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The two Kimmel Center resident organizations will combine their operational functions, though each will remain a separate nonprofit entity with their own board of directors. The public may see little change in the near-term, though crossmarketing and cost savings will eventually benefit both organizations. "Only about 6 percent of the audience attends both orchestras, so there is plenty of opportunity," said outgoing orchestra association president Joseph Kluger. "The Pops budget is about $4 million, a tenth of ours, but by combined saving on administration, ticketing, fund-raising and other matters, the number of Pops performances may be able to increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra will perform three neighborhood concerts this summer. Once again, all are free. Continuing a practice that started regularly in 2000, the orchestra will trade its downtown venue for area neighborhoods. This year's concerts will be on Penn's Landing, in Camden's Whitman Park, and at Montgomery County Community College. The program will differ slightly for each concert, but all three will include Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, Bernstein's "Overture" to Candide, and the "Symphonic Dances" from West Side Story.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Our Philadelphia Orchestra has garnered many historic firsts, and tomorrow night adds a cosmic one: the first symphony orchestra represented in space. The occasion is the 100th space shuttle launch, a slick tie-in to the upcoming 100th birthday of the Orchestra Nov. 16. Several weeks ago, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration filmed the Orchestra at the Academy of Music playing the opening bars of Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra," indelibly linked with Stanley Kubrick's film "2001: A Space Odyssey.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Karl Nielsen's symphonies blow through concert halls, their sounds a reminder that late romantic music is not neatly categorized. When Daniel Hege led the Haddonfield Symphony in Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 on Saturday, he was on a voyage of discovery. Certainly the piece is not overplayed, and it was probably being heard for the first time at the Voorhees Schools Theater. Nielsen's melodic ideas sound like poetry read in a not-quite-familiar language. Phrases, whole sections, move with fresh motion, modulate, shift and, in this work, burst into gaiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's first concert after its gala opening always has the air of a grateful return to its real mission. Orchestra and audience meet with high expectations on both sides and with few distractions to jostle those hopes. That was the basis on which the orchestra began its season last night at the Academy of Music. Riccardo Muti was on the podium, and in this beginning program, defined the orchestra's mission as one of pointing out the unifying threads that connect 19th- and 20th-century music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2011 | By David Runk, Associated Press
DETROIT - The Detroit Symphony Orchestra and its striking musicians said Monday that a tentative agreement reached after a weekend of lengthy negotiating sessions could resolve a six-month walkout. The deal, which was reached after a final 10 hours of talks on Sunday, is subject to a ratification vote expected this week, said musicians' spokesman Greg Bowens. If approved, he said, Detroit Federation of Musicians union members with the nationally acclaimed orchestra could be back at work by next weekend.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has been keeping alive the music of composer Vincent Persichetti with greater care since his death than before. James DePreist, in his first concert of the season, conducted the orchestra in Persichetti's Symphony No. 4 last night at the Mann Music Center. It was a good reminder off the composer's range, for this piece is full of bright good spirits and short bursts of melody. The dark, acerbic sounds of some of his other symphonies appear only occasionally in this piece.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's dress-to-kill program on its soon-to-start European tour was previewed Wednesday at Verizon Hall in what was also the close of Yannick Nézet-Séguin's third season as music director. The show illustrated his way of taking smart, middling chances and drawing the best from those around him. The world premiere of Nico Muhly's Mixed Messages showed the composer, in his first wholly new piece for the orchestra, eager to wow the audience with all the resources the orchestra offers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia began its 50th-anniversary season amid fears within the music community that there may not be a 51st, the official half-century celebration arrived Sunday at Verizon Hall with many visiting dignitaries and an air of solidity, both artistic and financial. Enjoyment was buoyed by relief. Music director Dirk Brossé promised an Organ Concerto but missed the deadline, and filled the slot with his own Philadelphia Overture and Barber's Toccata Festiva (with organist Alan Morrison often using demure tone colors to show just how wild this piece can be)
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
At what point does music become more of a tourist experience than art? Philadelphia Orchestra conductor-in-residence Cristian Macelaru walked all over such not-so-fine lines on Thursday at the Kimmel Center in a winningly idiosyncratic program bookended by two travelogues in sound from his native Romania - with folk elements cleaned and polished to a high gloss. Such music - Ligeti's Romanian Concerto and Enescu's Romanian Rhapsody Op. 11 No. 1 - can be a point of pride or a source of embarrassment to those who know the less-mediated roots of it all. But Macelaru had a whale of a time, also using these crowd-pleasing pieces for a more serious examination of great composers on the cusp of greatness with Dvorák's Violin Concerto featuring Sarah Chang, and Beethoven's Symphony No. 1 . Nothing trivial about that.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Philadelphia's All City Orchestra, the School District's little orchestra that could, is joining the ranks of its bigger, better-funded musical brethren and going on a foreign tour. The 115-or-so-member ensemble, drawn from public schools and recent alumni, will play five concerts in Italy in nine days starting June 20. It is the first tour for the program, says Don S. Liuzzi, the Philadelphia Orchestra timpanist who has led the orchestra for a decade. "There is no musical experience quite like taking your collective work on the road and musically giving and sharing with another country or culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Great music isn't a stranger to the Church of the Advocate on Diamond Street in the urban frontier of North Philadelphia. Just inside the French Gothic sanctuary, a large greenish angel points its trumpet heavenward. And only a few feet beyond that, on certain nights, stands the Prometheus Chamber Orchestra, in one of its regular season of free concerts - the second season concludes on Saturday - with hardly any budget and, what's more significant, no conductor. "It saves on overhead," says bassist Jerrell Jackson with subtle, smart-aleck irony.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Now that the Barnes Foundation has left its ancestral home, the award for most cloistered leading arts group in our city might belong to the Academy of Vocal Arts. Several decades of creating bespoke environments for experiencing art have not touched AVA's tiny theater - a cramped railway car-proportioned space of bourbon-colored walls, Arcadian murals and a grand hearth. It's paradoxical that AVA prepares opera students for the real world by having them perform in a venue unlike any other they will ever encounter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
CAMDEN - A large, blue package with one of the largest bows in the history of gift-giving sat in the Symphony in C box office Saturday, containing a recording of every concert departing music director Rossen Milanov has conducted over the last 15 years with this orchestra. One major performance was, of course, missing: his Saturday farewell at the Gordon Theater with Bruckner's Symphony No. 4 , which was, unsentimentally speaking, one of his best with this postgraduate ensemble. In his preperformance speech, Milanov spoke of growing up in front of the New Jersey public with the freedom to experiment - though he smartly took into account a conservative public that doesn't hear as many concerts as its counterpart across the river.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
What does it mean that the Philadelphia Orchestra is now stocking its subscription series with lighter works it once used to draw crowds to the Mann Center and as musical primers at children's concerts? French conductor Stéphane Denève is here for two weeks of populist programming that began Thursday night in the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall with a reprise of a Peter and the Wolf film the orchestra brought to the Mann in 2007. The hall was filled with plenty of grown-ups and a scattering of children who, by their general level of happy buzz, indicated approval.
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