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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Sometimes a thank-you note just won't do. And so the Curtis Institute of Music dedicated Sunday night's Curtis Symphony Orchestra concert in Verizon Hall to Marguerite and H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, whose philanthropic support of the school has eclipsed all before it. Having the orchestra do the honors was apt, since it was Gerry Lenfest, who is part-owner of the company that publishes The Inquirer and who is stepping down as board chair June 1, who...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Departed music directors aren't always missed, but Ignat Solzhenitsyn's return to the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia was greeted with unusual dedication by the musicians, almost as if they were reclaiming an identity Monday at the Kimmel Center. Solzhenitsyn's penchant for lesser-known works by major composers yielded a wonderful discovery in Schumann's Introduction and Allegro Appassionato (Op. 92 ; the conductor doubled as pianist), which tries to be urbane but has the composer's customary depths nonetheless.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
When you have an excellent clarinetist at your disposal, you send him out on stage with the Mozart concerto and crowds will swoon. But Ricardo Morales is no excellent clarinetist. He is a superlative one. For him on Thursday night, nothing less than the formidable   Weber Clarinet Concerto No. 1 would do, and the capacity audience roared. Christoph von Dohnányi was on the podium, and, rounding out the Philadelphia Orchestra program in Verizon Hall with Brahms and Beethoven, he won traditionalist hearts.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
There's a whiff of desperation to the Philadelphia Orchestra's current campaign to save music with the help of visuals. The latest salvo, unveiled Thursday night, imported artist/filmmaker Tal Rosner, who projected video pastiches on tall hanging scrims of Miami, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Los Angeles to roll along with the four movements of Britten's four "Sea Interludes. " Whether this sort of thing is an augmentation or a distraction is very much a personal call, and there are reasonable arguments to be made on both sides.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Is the Philadelphia Orchestra's audience being trained to respond to the dog whistle it sees, rather than the one it hears? Playing with movie scores, ballet dancers, even acrobats, the orchestra is increasingly sending the message that its core business - sound, right? - is no longer enough by itself. It announced Thursday that "stunning video images" will be added to next week's Britten program. Has the orchestra forgotten how to market an orchestra? You have to wonder, given concerts like Thursday night's, when a program as wholesome as Mozart and Brahms produced hundreds of empty seats in Verizon Hall.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonard Bogdanoff, 83, of Elkins Park, a violist with the Philadelphia Orchestra for a half-century, died Friday, March 15, at his home. Colleagues said Mr. Bogdanoff personified the best qualities of the orchestra's old guard. "When I think of Leonard, I think of the kindness in dealing with all of the other members of the viola section. He was just very fair," said Pamela Faye, a substitute violist with the orchestra and a frequent stand partner of Mr. Bogdanoff's. "You can have people who can make or break a section, and he was one of the ones who gave a positive influence, sound-wise, stylistically, all of it. That was really an inspiration to me. " Retired orchestra member Louis Lanza, who as a second violinist sat not far from Mr. Bogdanoff, called him "a very steady player, very accurate, and just a wonderful musician.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Although perfectly congenial, the Philadelphia Orchestra's high-concept program was up around the ozone Thursday when the Fauré Requiem was preceded by a succession of composers that spanned three centuries and as many nationalities - for no clear reason. Not knowing the connecting thread isn't a bad thing: Such things can reveal themselves over time. Hitting so many musical bases, though, translated into less cumulative impact, despite superb performances under guest conductor Alain Altinoglu.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
WARMINSTER Preparing a newly formed group of more than 100 high school musicians for a performance in less than three days takes guts. When that performance includes Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky, and an entire Dvorak symphony, it also requires practice. Unyielding hours of it. "It was a little intimidating at first," said Cindy Yeo, 15, a sophomore cellist at Germantown Friends School. "It's an intense little thing, it's not a prolonged thing. " Yeo was one of 117 students from more than 40 schools in Philadelphia, Bucks, Chester, Montgomery, and Delaware Counties who performed Saturday afternoon at William Tennent High School in Warminster.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The white floor cover on the Verizon Hall stage suggested something left over from a painting crew. Instead, the special surface was for Philadanco in its Friday collaboration with the Philadelphia Orchestra - an artistically gratifying enterprise that showed how easily such organizations can come together in an identity-enhancing experience. The meeting point was Poulenc's 1929 Aubade, a Jazz Age ballet/piano concerto hybrid performed with choreography by Tommie-Waheed Evans that wasn't out to change the world but showed off the quintet of female dancers well and authenticated the music's content.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The cost of war was palpable in the Philadelphia Orchestra's Thursday program of Strauss, Shostakovich, and Beethoven, one of Yannick Nézet-Séguin's most conceptually formidable and musically resourceful concerts. At this point in history, few of the musicians onstage have firsthand experience of the tragedies portrayed in Shostakovich's 1959 Cello Concerto No. 1 - a significant deterrent to tapping the music's fierce subtext about post-Stalin Russia. Nonetheless, the performance was bursting with empathy, the most audible manifestation being the extended cadenza in which cellist Johannes Moser (replacing Truls Mørk)
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