CollectionsOrchestra
IN THE NEWS

Orchestra

NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
As talks continue between the Philadelphia Orchestra Association and musicians over a new labor pact, management has agreed to hire consultant Michael M. Kaiser to assist in addressing chronic big-picture challenges like fund-raising and strategic direction. Musicians have been frustrated in contract talks - not only with the financial details of the deals management has been floating, but also with the financial realities that appear to be underpinning those offers. The association has been engaged in an endowment drive whose goals are not ambitious enough to support an orchestra of the level of Philadelphia's, musicians say. Kaiser will be retained for a six-month contract, according to an association spokeswoman.
NEWS
October 4, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
So the Rachmaninoff concerto recordings continue with the Philadelphia Orchestra after all. With the wildfire acclaim for the orchestra's collaboration with pianist Daniil Trifonov in Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini (just released on Deutsche Grammophon), a follow-up this week with the same forces and same composer's Piano Concerto No. 4 seemed planned, with four concerts to record Thursday through Sunday at the Kimmel Center. When questioned, the recording company was vague.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
What is the artistic future of the Philadelphia Orchestra - its repertoire, its sound, its personality? Wednesday's opening-night gala passed up a chance to answer that big question, and asked instead: Did we ever tell you about Fantasia ? About 1,100 guests sat in Verizon Hall to watch clips and hear the orchestra play excerpts from the 1940 film before about half headed to the lobby for dinner. The event raised $550,000 before expenses for general operating support, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
September 29, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
All else seemed but an earthly prologue by Sunday afternoon's massive outdoor papal Mass on the Parkway. The logistical hurdles, pope tchotchkes silly and sincere, the queasy police-state feeling that gripped the city starting Friday - all was set aside as the Philadelphia Orchestra and a chorus of about 500 laid down a soundtrack of contemplation and triumph for an in-person and online audience of perhaps a million or more. The orchestra, led by music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, played Beethoven and Brahms as the papal motorcade arrived at Eakins Oval with the Philadelphia Museum of Art the backdrop, and a canopy of cool gray skies over the crowd.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Everyone in the Philadelphia Orchestra could assume, even before collaborating with pianist Daniil Trifonov, that he was much more than your typical hot competition winner. When he recorded Rachmaninoff with the orchestra in March in Philadelphia, it was under costly studio conditions, unusual for any major recording company working in America. The Deutsche Grammophon production was made from scratch, not in concert - rare since the CD heyday of the 1990s. Trifonov, 24, played Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini with relentless tenacity, take after take, hour after hour, never letting the tension go slack, according to musicians present.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Nobody ever said Orchestra 2001 couldn't rock - a modern ensemble has to be able to do anything - but perhaps no previous program has challenged this group (a 10-player version) to prove it so vehemently as the one Sunday under guest conductor Jayce Ogren at the Arts Bank. Four composers were heard at their most raucous, in performances that displayed a controlled abandon seldom heard in new-music concerts. The idea was to show how rock-and-roll has been morphed by minimalists such as Julia Wolfe and Louis Andriessen, as well as more mainstream figures such as Jennifer Higdon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Someday, if the current trend continues, technology addicts will skip all this handheld nonsense and just have cellphones implanted directly in their brains. Until then, arts groups will continue looking for ways to integrate technology into the concert experience, like Sunday afternoon's premiere at the Kimmel of a new work for piano, chamber orchestra, and iGadgets. Conrad Tao's An Adjustment , which opened the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia's 51st season, did not succumb to technology for its own sake.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Musicians and management of the Philadelphia Orchestra have agreed to talk and play as negotiations continue over a new labor contract, several sources say. The expiring deal was one of steep cuts crafted in 2011 under supervision of U.S. Bankruptcy Court after the Philadelphia Orchestra Association filed for Chapter 11 reorganization. The pact was to have expired Sept. 13, but both sides agreed to an extension until 12:01 a.m. Sept. 28 - just after a concert and Mass for Pope Francis' visit, for which the orchestra is playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Yet another charming, youthful conductor has arrived on classical music's doorstep. The 31-year-old Bulgarian Stilian Kirov, fresh from the associate conductorship of the Seattle Symphony, has promptly filled the void left by Symphony in C's departing longtime music director, Rossen Milanov. Kirov's debut concert Saturday at the Gordon Theater at Rutgers-Camden raised a lot of questions that will be answered only in future concerts, but one thing was clear: He is maintaining the orchestra's high standard of playing.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
When James Freeman founded a new music group in 1988, the name he chose might have suggested a specific date of expiry: Orchestra 2001. Today, with that once-futuristic-sounding year far in the rearview mirror, Orchestra 2001 is still here, and is still presenting 20th - and now 21st century - art music. But by the end of the season, Orchestra 2001 promises to be something quite different. Freeman has retired, and what once looked like a sole proprietorship with a limited run has emerged as a self-perpetuating, board-run organization.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|