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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Of all the hours of music that will transpire at the Kimmel Center during the Philadelphia Orchestra's 2015-2016 season, the most eagerly anticipated are likely to be the concerts led by James Levine, revered music director of the Metropolitan Opera. Having been personally invited by Philadelphia Orchestra music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin - a regular guest conductor at the Met - Levine will make his first conducting appearance outside of New York City since he returned from a series of back-related surgeries and a two-year hiatus that ended in 2013.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
On a subfreezing night with an untested concert format, is it any surprise that the Philadelphia Orchestra's first LiveNote Night, designed to attract new audiences to classical music, was preaching to the semi-converted on Wednesday at the Kimmel Center? The event represented a confluence of past seasons' "Beyond the Score" concerts (earlier, shorter, instructively oriented) and the pop-up performance scheduled spontaneously in 2013 when the orchestra's Carnegie Hall date was canceled by a stagehands strike.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra last toured Europe in 2011 in deeply uncertain circumstances: The orchestra was still in bankruptcy and entering contract negotiations amid fears about the future. Yannick Nézet-Séguin had been appointed, but would not become music director until the next year. The orchestra was led by chief conductor Charles Dutoit. In contrast, the 2015 Tour of Europe, announced Tuesday, promises to be a consolidation of more successful times for the Philadelphia Orchestra, and under the leadership of Nézet-Séguin, already a well-known figure there.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Stokking, 81, retired principal cellist of the Philadelphia Orchestra and former faculty member of the Curtis Institute, died Sunday, Dec. 14, at a Moorestown nursing home of complications from a stroke. Esteemed for his refined tone, Mr. Stokking joined the orchestra in 1960 and played for six years under Eugene Ormandy before departing to play as principal with the Chamber Symphony of Philadelphia. Upon the chamber group's demise, he played for the Boston Philharmonic and as principal with the Cleveland Orchestra under George Szell before returning to the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1973.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
French cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras might have initially looked like a rerun: He played Haydn's mid-weight Cello Concerto in C in 2008 with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, even though an artist of his stature warrants a rather more grand musical platform. Or so it seemed until he actually played, reprising the concerto Thursday with the Philadelphia Orchestra. One of Europe's top cellists, Queyras makes this infrequent U.S. appearance on the heels of a memorable collaboration abroad with music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, who wanted to repeat the experience for Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2014 | By Dan Webster, For The Inquirer
It was Pied Piper night at the Philadelphia Orchestra. The audience Friday at Verizon Hall gladly would have followed clarinetist Ricardo Morales out the doors and to any destination he proposed. Morales, principal clarinet since 2003, explored shadings of his instrument's eloquence in Debussy's Premiere Rhapsodie and brought the audience to its feet with the cascades of notes and theatrical flourishes that characterize Rossini's Introduction, Theme and Variations . Although the sheer jubilance and charm of the Rossini evoked that ovation, it was in the subtle and thoughtful Debussy piece that a range of the soloist's gifts could be savored.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra will perform a free concert Tuesday at the Kimmel Center as part of the nationwide GivingTuesday campaign that seeks charitable contributions. Seating is general admission, and tickets may be reserved beginning at 8 a.m. Tuesday, at www.philorch.org . There will be holiday music in Commonwealth Plaza starting at 6 p.m., with opportunities to conduct the players. The Verizon Hall doors open at 7, and the 75-minute concert begins at 7:30. Music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will lead the ensemble in seasonal favorites from Tchaikovsky, Leroy Anderson, and Brahms, plus works by Pulitzer Prize-winning Philadelphia composer Jennifer Higdon and others.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The fashion world has long popularized clothes that appear to be turned inside out. Why shouldn't the Philadelphia Orchestra do its own version of that every so often? How could that work? Dvorák's Symphony No. 8 was so significantly reimagined by guest conductor Jakub Hruša that you'd think the prevailing, mellifluous tradition of Wolfgang Sawallisch never existed. The music was a rougher ride but full of incident. Orchestral sonorities that are normally string-dominated shared the sound picture more equally with brass and winds.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Ah, that's more like it. The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia found its autumn-season legs, a little late, in a program featuring the orchestra's brilliant principal violist, Ayane Kozasa, and a surprise from music director Dirk Brossé - not the usual bonbon, but an Arvo Pärt piece that was the best thing on the program, and possibly one of the season's highlights. The Japanese-born, Curtis Institute-educated Kozasa may not be a revelation to juries of the competitions she has won, but she was new to this listener, having been deterred from her December 2013 Astral Artists recital by one of many blizzards.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
China's global economic expansion has been slow to include a matching rise in cultural institutions among its exports, but Friday brought a major step toward changing that when a youthful orchestra from Beijing played an internationally televised concert at the Kimmel Center. The concert by the NCPA Orchestra had special resonance here, because the Philadelphia Orchestra played in 1973 in a nation that had once put its musicians in coal mines and closed universities and conservatories but was cautiously peering over its cultural wall.
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