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Ordinary Life

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NEWS
April 24, 2016
Lust and Wonder A Memoir By Augusten Burroughs St. Martin. 304 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by Aubrey Whelan There are really only two reasons to write a memoir: You have had an unusual life, and you have good reason to believe others will want to read about it. You are living a mostly ordinary life, but you are prepared to write about it so beautifully the mundane becomes transcendent. Augusten Burroughs started writing memoirs for the first reason.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many years, artist Lady Bird Strickland painted the people that she met in her life - and it was no ordinary life. Subjects such as Dizzy Gillespie, Josephine Baker, Charlie Parker, Marian Anderson, Miles Davis, and Duke Ellington were all part of the jazz bebop scene in Harlem where the young Georgia native danced and romanced in the 1940s, before putting it all down with brushstrokes. But by the 1980s - married, settled down in suburban Willingboro, and still painting - Strickland began to grasp that the New York jazz era that she had witnessed was just one scene in a much larger mural of the African American experience.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By Gregory J. Sullivan
The Da Vinci Code opens in theaters today. If it is faithful to Dan Brown's embarrassingly mediocre novel, the movie will advance a host of historical and theological errors, and it will caricature the Catholic group Opus Dei. Since this will be many viewers' introduction to Opus Dei, some facts are in order: Founded in 1928 by a Spanish priest, St. Josemaria Escriva, Opus Dei (which is Latin for "Work of God") has approximately 80,000 members throughout the world. They are priests and laymen and laywomen, married and celibate.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1989 | By Sherryl Connelly, New York Daily News
They are rather a common family, these Wardmans, having drawn the dreary lot of working-class life in the British class system. Mom, a widow, does perms in the kitchen for pin money, Fee's planning an overly elaborate wedding, while Philip's just drifting. But not for long. Senta is "Bridesmaid," the agent of terror in Ruth Rendell's horrific new novel (Mysterious Press, $17.95). She has come to rescue Philip from his ordinary life. She's going to take him to Hell. Senta looks like a model, says she's an actress.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Theater Critic
Artistic director Deborah Baer Mozes says she wanted to open Theatre Ariel, Philadelphia's first theater company dedicated to Jewish themes, with a play that "celebrates life," for a theater's coming to life. She also wanted a play that reflects "the spirit of the month of December, a play for Hanukah, a play for all celebrating winter holidays. " In Dividends, which Mozes is directing at the Walnut Street Theater's Studio 3, she found a work that fits her requirements. Gary Richards' play, about a dying elderly man's relationship with his adult grandson, is all about the small joys that make an ordinary life worth living.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the peaceful era of the 1950s, a slender, elderly woman named Ida Ruth Jones lived here surrounded by farm animals and flowers. She had raised 10 children, but they had flown the coop, as they say in this tiny village just outside of Coatesville. It seemed an ordinary life, but Jones was the talk of the town. A self-taught creator of charmingly quaint paintings depicting sleigh rides, family pets and the chores of farm life, Jones was hailed as "the Grandma Moses of Chester County.
NEWS
April 8, 2012
A Novel By Anne Tyler Alfred A. Knopf. 198 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler Anne Tyler is one of America's premier novelists of middle-class morality and manners. Tyler places her quirky, flawed, and fundamentally decent characters in ordinary situations, generating smiles and sighs of recognition from her readers at their responses. She reminds us that human beings cope with the vicissitudes of life because they have no other choice, that small things loom larger than large things, and that, on balance, in relationships that matter, it is best to tap untapped feelings.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
Right now, Jada Pinkett is the girl with all the chips. She's Eddie Murphy's co-star in "The Nutty Professor," which opens today. She's featured in an upcoming HBO movie with Cher and she's already wrapped a film with Queen Latifah due in October. Plus she's Philly homeboy Will Smith's girlfriend. But don't define Pinkett by the man in her life. The 24-year-old Baltimore native may be just a shade over 5 feet tall, but she's holding her own. As a black actress in a town where "black" is most often thought of as the color of a car or an Armani power suit, she's developing a high-powered career.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the peaceful era of the 1950s, a slender, elderly woman named Ida Ruth Jones lived here surrounded by farm animals and flowers. She had raised 10 children, but they had flown the coop, as they say in this tiny village just outside of Coatesville. It seemed an ordinary life, but Jones was the talk of the town. A self-taught creator of charmingly quaint paintings depicting sleigh rides, family pets and the chores of farm life, Jones was hailed as "the Grandma Moses of Chester County.
LIVING
February 10, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Is a philosopher who writes novels automatically a philosophical novelist? Is a dancer who becomes a patient automatically a dancing patient? Like all philosophy professors, Dame Iris Murdoch, who died Monday at age 79, took logical inference seriously. She didn't like the tag "philosophical novelist" because, despite all the bric-a-brac from Plato, ethics and existentialism that appeared in her 26 novels, the aesthetic path she struck early in her career was best labeled anti-philosophical.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 24, 2016
Lust and Wonder A Memoir By Augusten Burroughs St. Martin. 304 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by Aubrey Whelan There are really only two reasons to write a memoir: You have had an unusual life, and you have good reason to believe others will want to read about it. You are living a mostly ordinary life, but you are prepared to write about it so beautifully the mundane becomes transcendent. Augusten Burroughs started writing memoirs for the first reason.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Orhan Pamuk seems to be infatuated with the idea of love at first sight. The postmodern novelist, who in 2006 became the first Turkish author to win a Nobel Prize in literature, mines that particular topic in two of his greatest novels, Snow (2002) and The Museum of Innocence (2008). Pamuk's sometimes hapless heroes, overeducated men of class, distinction, and intellect, fall hopelessly under the spell of beauties they glimpse for but a moment. The result is usually less than heartwarming: The men generally end up alone and miserable.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many years, artist Lady Bird Strickland painted the people that she met in her life - and it was no ordinary life. Subjects such as Dizzy Gillespie, Josephine Baker, Charlie Parker, Marian Anderson, Miles Davis, and Duke Ellington were all part of the jazz bebop scene in Harlem where the young Georgia native danced and romanced in the 1940s, before putting it all down with brushstrokes. But by the 1980s - married, settled down in suburban Willingboro, and still painting - Strickland began to grasp that the New York jazz era that she had witnessed was just one scene in a much larger mural of the African American experience.
NEWS
April 8, 2012
A Novel By Anne Tyler Alfred A. Knopf. 198 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler Anne Tyler is one of America's premier novelists of middle-class morality and manners. Tyler places her quirky, flawed, and fundamentally decent characters in ordinary situations, generating smiles and sighs of recognition from her readers at their responses. She reminds us that human beings cope with the vicissitudes of life because they have no other choice, that small things loom larger than large things, and that, on balance, in relationships that matter, it is best to tap untapped feelings.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By Gregory J. Sullivan
The Da Vinci Code opens in theaters today. If it is faithful to Dan Brown's embarrassingly mediocre novel, the movie will advance a host of historical and theological errors, and it will caricature the Catholic group Opus Dei. Since this will be many viewers' introduction to Opus Dei, some facts are in order: Founded in 1928 by a Spanish priest, St. Josemaria Escriva, Opus Dei (which is Latin for "Work of God") has approximately 80,000 members throughout the world. They are priests and laymen and laywomen, married and celibate.
SPORTS
September 22, 2002 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Megan Moody, a theater-arts student in Perth, Australia, spent almost two months on a half-million-dollar catamaran in the waters below Australia early last year. There were four others on board, including the owner, Bison Dele, who had just bought the boat, the Hakuna Matata. During her time on the boat, Moody learned that Dele, 33, had walked away from the more than $30 million left on his contract with the NBA's Detroit Pistons. She also believed that she had come to understand why. "I think he came to a point where he didn't like who he became, through the sensationalism of being a prominent basketball player in the States," Moody said in a telephone interview last week.
FOOD
April 25, 2001 | by Renee Lucas Wayne Daily News Staff Writer
Eat Mangoes Naked: Finding Pleasure Everywhere and Dancing with the Pits! by SARK; Fireside Books (203 pages, $16) SARK - that succulent woman given to living juicy, dispensing inspiration sandwiches and serving up transformation soup - is back. This time she's eating mangoes - naked. Known as Susan Ariel Rainbow Kennedy to the IRS and others devoid of whimsy, the author now gives us "Eat Mangoes Naked: Finding Pleasure Everywhere and Dancing with the Pits!" It's a handbook for discovering, embracing, magnifying and passing along pleasure.
LIVING
February 10, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Is a philosopher who writes novels automatically a philosophical novelist? Is a dancer who becomes a patient automatically a dancing patient? Like all philosophy professors, Dame Iris Murdoch, who died Monday at age 79, took logical inference seriously. She didn't like the tag "philosophical novelist" because, despite all the bric-a-brac from Plato, ethics and existentialism that appeared in her 26 novels, the aesthetic path she struck early in her career was best labeled anti-philosophical.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Princess Diana never found her happily-ever-after. Despite her storybook 1981 wedding, complete with gleaming carriages, glorious footmen and a dazzling tiara, despite riches and fame and the entire world's attention, the young royal spent most of her adult life trapped in a troubled sea of loneliness and dissatisfaction. Just when it seemed as if the doe-eyed 36-year-old had finally discovered her real Prince Charming, Dodi al-Fayed, her story came to a shocking end. So much for fairy tales.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
Right now, Jada Pinkett is the girl with all the chips. She's Eddie Murphy's co-star in "The Nutty Professor," which opens today. She's featured in an upcoming HBO movie with Cher and she's already wrapped a film with Queen Latifah due in October. Plus she's Philly homeboy Will Smith's girlfriend. But don't define Pinkett by the man in her life. The 24-year-old Baltimore native may be just a shade over 5 feet tall, but she's holding her own. As a black actress in a town where "black" is most often thought of as the color of a car or an Armani power suit, she's developing a high-powered career.
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