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Ordinary People

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1996 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
'Hidden in Plain Sight" is a photography exhibition based on a very familiar, simple idea - that beauty and truth can exist in images so ordinary they hardly seem worth noticing. The world-in-a-grain-of-sand concept is most easily recognized when the photographers' subjects are common objects. A similar approach, which seems more prevalent today, involves ordinary people doing ordinary things in ordinary places. The three photographers featured in "Hidden in Plain Sight," at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, are especially skilled at finding visual and sociological interest in places where many people wouldn't think to look.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | By Daniel Woolls, Associated Press
SANT CLIMENT DE LLOBREGAT, Spain - Drop those cherries, you're under arrest. Crops and cops are converging along Spain's journey through economic crisis: People enduring hardship are stealing the earth's bounty from farmers to help get by from day to day. Police have added the patrolling of farmland - sometimes on horseback - to their list of daily tasks. Farmers in some areas are teaming up for nighttime patrols on their own. In villages near farming areas, several thousand paramilitary Civil Guards, regional and local police are even setting up checkpoints to sniff out not drugs or drunken drivers but stolen fruit or farming equipment, like copper wire used in irrigation systems.
LIVING
October 29, 2000 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're everywhere. We see them featured in newspaper columns and on national television. They're starring Off-Broadway and guest-hosting on Live With Regis in lieu of Kathie Lee. Webcams track their trips to the toilet and we're fascinated. They're ordinary people and they are the new celebrities. Meg, Madonna and Jewel may continue to rake in millions and dominate the cover of Entertainment Weekly. Meanwhile, let us celebrate the lives of real people. Let us elevate the ordinary.
NEWS
April 12, 2014
It's often amazing to read how ordinary people react in extraordinary circumstances. Take Wednesday's mass stabbings at Franklin Regional High School near Pittsburgh, where more than 20 people were stabbed or injured, but no deaths occurred due largely to heroic acts by students and school officials. Assistant principal Sam King wrestled Alex Hribal, the 16-year-old suspect, to the ground, with assistance from senior Ian Griffith. Sophomore Brett Hurt, who was stabbed in the back while trying to protect his friend Gracey Evans, gives her credit for saving his life by putting pressure on the wound to slow the bleeding.
NEWS
July 30, 2008
The death yesterday of pioneer television journalist Edie Huggins, the first African American woman to report on the air in the city, has touched thousands of Philadelphians who admired her stories about ordinary people. Huggins was 72. Her career spanned more than 40 years, but she may be best remembered for her "Huggins' Heroes" vignettes on NBC10, in which she profiled plain people, many of whom had devoted their lives to helping others. Viewers were invited to nominate "ordinary people doing extraordinary things" for the recognition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The thesis behind David Schulner's An Infinite Ache is that regular folks fall in love, and that they, too, deserve their moment in the spotlight. Or as Charles, the male half of this couple whose entire 50-year relationship and marriage we're about to watch, explains, "I'm just an ordinary guy. Nobody tells us how ordinary people should love. " Theatre Horizon agrees, and indulges Schulner with an utterly run-of-the-mill production. The problems with Schulner's thesis are many. First, no one thinks he's ordinary - and certainly no one who works in a coffeehouse and aspires to be a historian/novelist.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN FLORENCE and David Cohen were married in New York City in 1946, they had time for only a quick honeymoon. Florence's union was on strike. Her dedication to the union, United Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America, for which she traveled up and down the East Coast as an organizer, was an early example of Florence's lifelong devotion to causes of benefit to ordinary people. "She was a voice of the people," said her daughter, Sherrie Cohen, a Philadelphia lawyer and current candidate for a City Council at-large seat.
NEWS
June 9, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
To conduct a massive research "legacy project" demonstrating how his policies have helped the lives of ordinary people, Gov. Rendell has hired Philadelphia public relations honcho and former mouthpiece Kevin Feeley for $30,000. A steal! The governor's helped us ordinary people immeasurably, giving us nearly eight years of nonstop entertainment. We ordinary people initially, and unwittingly, funded the Ed legacy project - dare I call it the lEdgacy - with our donations, otherwise known as taxes.
NEWS
May 24, 2000
The Phillies, the new stadium and the taxpayers It was refreshing to read Andrew Cassel's column on new stadiums (Inquirer, May 15). I was beginning to think that I was the only one who saw the location issue as a smokescreen covering up the real issue: Who's going to foot the bill? And who made John Street stadium czar? I would like to see Philadelphia have a great new downtown baseball stadium, but let the team owners pay for it, a la the San Francisco Giants. I'd be all for any city and state support in the form of tax breaks, but I don't want to foot the bill.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | By HENDRIK HARTOG
I AM THE CHILD of Holocaust survivors. I write that not to assert authority, but to introduce a perspective common to those of us who grew up in the households of survivors. That is, I learned from my parents, with little being said about it, that everyday life - including its routine, its safety, its security and its freedom - was a momentary accident likely to disappear. A life without traumas was not something to which one felt entitled, even if, as was certainly the case for me, childhood brought no cataclysms.
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NEWS
January 15, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN FLORENCE and David Cohen were married in New York City in 1946, they had time for only a quick honeymoon. Florence's union was on strike. Her dedication to the union, United Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America, for which she traveled up and down the East Coast as an organizer, was an early example of Florence's lifelong devotion to causes of benefit to ordinary people. "She was a voice of the people," said her daughter, Sherrie Cohen, a Philadelphia lawyer and current candidate for a City Council at-large seat.
NEWS
April 12, 2014
It's often amazing to read how ordinary people react in extraordinary circumstances. Take Wednesday's mass stabbings at Franklin Regional High School near Pittsburgh, where more than 20 people were stabbed or injured, but no deaths occurred due largely to heroic acts by students and school officials. Assistant principal Sam King wrestled Alex Hribal, the 16-year-old suspect, to the ground, with assistance from senior Ian Griffith. Sophomore Brett Hurt, who was stabbed in the back while trying to protect his friend Gracey Evans, gives her credit for saving his life by putting pressure on the wound to slow the bleeding.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The thesis behind David Schulner's An Infinite Ache is that regular folks fall in love, and that they, too, deserve their moment in the spotlight. Or as Charles, the male half of this couple whose entire 50-year relationship and marriage we're about to watch, explains, "I'm just an ordinary guy. Nobody tells us how ordinary people should love. " Theatre Horizon agrees, and indulges Schulner with an utterly run-of-the-mill production. The problems with Schulner's thesis are many. First, no one thinks he's ordinary - and certainly no one who works in a coffeehouse and aspires to be a historian/novelist.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
RE: "JUDICIAL Money Alert" ("Baer Growls" blog, philly.com, Nov. 19). With the 2013 judicial elections fast approaching, it's time for Pennsylvanians to get real about the impact of exploding judicial- election spending on our courts. As John Baer's blog illustrates, the most recent judicial elections across the country broke spending records left and right. There's no reason to believe that next year's judicial elections won't follow the trend. Runaway judicial campaign spending gives the impression that justice can be bought.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | By Daniel Woolls, Associated Press
SANT CLIMENT DE LLOBREGAT, Spain - Drop those cherries, you're under arrest. Crops and cops are converging along Spain's journey through economic crisis: People enduring hardship are stealing the earth's bounty from farmers to help get by from day to day. Police have added the patrolling of farmland - sometimes on horseback - to their list of daily tasks. Farmers in some areas are teaming up for nighttime patrols on their own. In villages near farming areas, several thousand paramilitary Civil Guards, regional and local police are even setting up checkpoints to sniff out not drugs or drunken drivers but stolen fruit or farming equipment, like copper wire used in irrigation systems.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella
This weekend a group of men will gather at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary to how learn to throw a spiral, make a three-point shot and hit a long ball — and to resist homosexual urges. Courage, a Catholic group that encourages people with same-sex attraction to remain celibate, is holding its 13th annual sports camp in which "men physically compete on the field while enriching their souls through a daily regimen of prayer, confessions, mass, and the Liturgy of the Hours," according to the group's website.
NEWS
October 15, 2010
By Ken Herman As I'm writing this, the 18th Chilean miner just hit ground level. The rescue has been inspiring to watch, complete with emotional family reunions. Good for the miners. Good for their families. Good for us for feeling good about this. And good for the Chileans who made it happen. But it occurs to me that the miners are going from one test to another. One is in a hot, challenging, sometimes dark environment in which survival is not guaranteed. The other was the mine they were trapped in. Both involve peril.
NEWS
June 9, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
To conduct a massive research "legacy project" demonstrating how his policies have helped the lives of ordinary people, Gov. Rendell has hired Philadelphia public relations honcho and former mouthpiece Kevin Feeley for $30,000. A steal! The governor's helped us ordinary people immeasurably, giving us nearly eight years of nonstop entertainment. We ordinary people initially, and unwittingly, funded the Ed legacy project - dare I call it the lEdgacy - with our donations, otherwise known as taxes.
NEWS
July 30, 2008
The death yesterday of pioneer television journalist Edie Huggins, the first African American woman to report on the air in the city, has touched thousands of Philadelphians who admired her stories about ordinary people. Huggins was 72. Her career spanned more than 40 years, but she may be best remembered for her "Huggins' Heroes" vignettes on NBC10, in which she profiled plain people, many of whom had devoted their lives to helping others. Viewers were invited to nominate "ordinary people doing extraordinary things" for the recognition.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | By HENDRIK HARTOG
I AM THE CHILD of Holocaust survivors. I write that not to assert authority, but to introduce a perspective common to those of us who grew up in the households of survivors. That is, I learned from my parents, with little being said about it, that everyday life - including its routine, its safety, its security and its freedom - was a momentary accident likely to disappear. A life without traumas was not something to which one felt entitled, even if, as was certainly the case for me, childhood brought no cataclysms.
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