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Organ Donation

NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
In our region, 6,500 critically ill residents wait for organs, kidneys, livers, hearts. After a notable 8.6 percent decline last year, local organ donations have increased - March was a banner month - but not enough if you ask anyone who has been waiting and waiting, an average of five years for a healthy kidney. In 1994, Pennsylvania became one of the first states to list organ donation on driver's licenses. The region is a mecca with eight surgical centers performing transplants.
LIVING
November 12, 2000 | By Brendan January, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anthony Yeni has a new liver and a new purpose. "Before, I didn't know why I had been given a second chance," the Cherry Hill resident said. "Now, I know it's to go out to speak and educate. " Yeni's drive is common among organ recipients, and many of them are out this weekend - Donor Sabbath Weekend - speaking for what they call "the gift of life. " The message is going out in hundreds of sanctuaries across the country in an effort to raise awareness of organ donation and reassure worshipers that they don't need their organs to make it to heaven.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Pamela J. Podger, Special to The Inquirer
Even before Sister Kathleenjoy Cooper grips her paddle in a table tennis match at this weekend's U.S. Transplant Games in Indianapolis, she knows she has already won a lifelong prize - a kidney. Sister Cooper of Haverford is one of 50 Delaware Valley contestants who will compete with about 450 other athletes - all transplant recipients - in Olympic-style games organized by the National Kidney Foundation Inc. and Sandoz Pharmaceutical Corp. The event is the first nationally organized counterpart to the International Transplant Games, slated for Budapest, Hungary, next year.
NEWS
May 31, 2002 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials at Mercy Suburban Hospital said the accused double murderer who hanged himself in a Montgomery County prison is brain dead. However, Chang Qi - charged with fatally stabbing the wife and 8-year old son of a former employer on May 9 - remains on life support. "He is brain dead. He's in grave condition," said Sonya Evans-Johnson, spokeswoman for the East Norriton hospital. She declined comment on whether he was being kept on life support for purposes of organ donation. Prison guards found Qi hanging from a shower rod in his cell in the prison's medical wing at about 1 a.m. on Wednesday.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The parents of a 10-year-old Newtown Square girl who is in dire need of a lung transplant have made a public appeal for a lung donation from any family that loses a loved one. Janet and Fran Murnaghan said such a directed organ donation is the "only hope" for daughter Sarah, who has cystic fibrosis and has been on the lung transplant waiting list for 18 months. She has been in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia since February, where she is on a pressurized oxygen machine. Her case illustrates how relatively few pediatric lungs become available for transplant while adult lungs - which could be cut down to fit her - must first be offered to all wait-listed adults in the region.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Innovative methods that would increase the number of human organs available for transplants in the future were the center of discussion yesterday at the regional conference of the National Kidney Foundation at the Sheraton Society Hill. Financial incentives for organ donors and the routine "harvesting" of organs from dead people unless survivors specifically object were among the controversial topics aired. The conference was called to examine innovative approaches to a problem that worsens daily.
NEWS
February 14, 2005 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's Valentine's Day, a perfect time to think about love and hearts. Not to mention kidneys, lungs, corneas and all the other precious organs you could possibly donate after death. Polls show 83 percent of Americans are in favor of organ donation and transplantation, yet most do not sign organ donor cards. That's true even in Pennsylvania, where passage of a law a decade ago promoting donation has made it a national model. Pennsylvanians can become designated organ donors through a simple checkoff on their driver's licenses or state identification cards, yet only 42 percent, or about 3.8 million, have done so. In Philadelphia, 29 percent are designated donors, the lowest county rate in the state.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
When the group of organ transplant experts approached Dr. Clive Callender, a senior black transplant surgeon in the U.S., the Howard University Hospital specialist was perplexed by their question. Why is it, they asked him, that 70 percent of the patients undergoing kidney dialysis treatment are black, but fewer than 10 percent of the kidneys donated for transplants come from black donors? "I didn't know the answer, so I said I'd get back to them," Callender said. That was six years ago. Today, he's found answers - and raised many new questions.
NEWS
March 16, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hey, buddy, can you spare a kidney? What if you got $10,000 for your trouble? $100,000? Or more? With 106,131 Americans now on waiting lists for an organ - 83,754 of them for kidneys - researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia VA Medical Center sought to find out whether financial incentives would increase living organ donation. Their findings - that payments would draw more participants without relying disproportionately on poor people - are highly controversial.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
Dialing Shirley Sinclair's number was harder than I thought it would be. Sure, she had agreed to talk about the New Year's Eve death of her son, but asking the questions was an uneasy, intrusive process. Delbert Sinclair went out at 8 that night. The call came at 1 a.m. At Einstein Medical Center, they told Sinclair and her husband their 29-year-old son had been beaten wih a bat -so brutally he would never wake up. Through a wall of shock and grief, the Sinclair family made a courageous choice.
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