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Organ Donation

NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through the 1990s and into the 2000s, as public awareness about the need for organ transplants grew, the number of people who became donors - living and deceased - increased by several hundred each year. In the last four years, however, that number has leveled off. Last year, total donors were down slightly nationwide. Locally, there was a bigger drop. Pennsylvania saw a 6.6 percent decline in the number of people who were organ donors last year, while New Jersey's number fell 7.9 percent, according to data collected by the United Network for Organ Sharing, a federal contractor that manages the U.S. transplant system.
NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Rehrmann is such a believer in organ donation that he ran a full-page ad in Tuesday's Inquirer urging people to follow his example and register as a donor. "Think of the incredible relief of human suffering you will have helped bring about," the 84-year-old retired aeronautical engineer wrote in the $3,700 advertisement, published in Pennsylvania editions. Alas, his altruistic promotion contained some misinformation about how to register. And it turns out that he actually signed up to give his body for medical education, not organ donation.
NEWS
May 29, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
William V. Keys, 82, of Cherry Hill, a former Philadelphia Electric Co. supervisor who underwent a heart transplant in 1990 and became a major advocate for organ donations, died Wednesday, May 26, at home. After working nearly 30 years in the transportation division of Philadelphia Electric, now Peco Energy Co., Mr. Keys suffered a massive heart attack that forced him to retire earlier than expected. His gall bladder was removed in 1989 and he was also hospitalized at that time with congestive heart failure.
NEWS
March 16, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hey, buddy, can you spare a kidney? What if you got $10,000 for your trouble? $100,000? Or more? With 106,131 Americans now on waiting lists for an organ - 83,754 of them for kidneys - researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia VA Medical Center sought to find out whether financial incentives would increase living organ donation. Their findings - that payments would draw more participants without relying disproportionately on poor people - are highly controversial.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2008 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Howard Nathan set out to be a doctor. Rejected from medical school, he hoped that networking with some prominent local transplant surgeons might give him another shot at admission. Instead, Nathan, who runs Philadelphia's Gift of Life Donor Program, wound up a world traveler and a prominent leader in the world of organ transplantation. Now in his 31st year at the organ program, he is president of the International Society of Organ Donation and Procurement. In 1978, Nathan became the third employee of what was then the Delaware Valley Transplant Program.
NEWS
July 29, 2008 | By Jonathan Tamari INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In New Jersey, summer doesn't just bring the dog days. In June, July and August there's also Delaware Bay Day, National Airborne Day and Toms River East Little League World Champions Day (Aug. 29, if you're planning ahead). Those are just some of the 80-plus honorary days, months and weeks New Jersey lawmakers have put on the books to raise awareness, commemorate acts and honor causes, including the patriotic (Liberty Day), the obscure (Credit Union Day) and the redundant (New Jersey Day)
NEWS
February 19, 2008
RICK SELVIN, the ex-Daily News staffer who died recently, was very lucky to get a heart transplant and 10 more years of life. More than half of the 98,000 Americans on the national waiting list will die before they get a transplant, most needlessly. Americans bury or cremate about 20,000 transplantable organs every year. More than 6,000 of their neighbors die every year as a result. There is a simple way to put a big dent in the organ shortage - give organs first to people who have agreed to donate their organs when they die. Giving organs first to organ donors will persuade more people to register as organ donors.
NEWS
February 14, 2008 | Daily News wire services
Police hunting for madman who butchered N.Y. therapist NEW YORK - Police were hunting last night for a man who entered a psychologist's office with a bag of knives and a meat cleaver and hacked her to death. A colleague who responded to the victim's screams was badly wounded, and investigators were trying to determine whether the attacker was a patient at the clinic. Three knives were recovered at the scene, including the cleaver, which was apparently bent from the attack, police said.
NEWS
February 13, 2008
After you breathe your last breath, you may help another person live - if you have signed an organ and tissue donor card. Remember that tomorrow, which in addition to being Valentine's Day is National Donor Day. What a way to show your love? Anyone can become a potential donor, regardless of age, race or medical history. In Pennsylvania and New Jersey, you can sign up where you get your driver's license or nondriver ID. Online, go to www.organdonor.gov There are 98,000 people in the United States awaiting a donation.
NEWS
August 4, 2006 | Inquirer staff
Pennsylvanians with a valid driver's license or photo identification card can now register online to become an organ donor on the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation's Driver and Vehicle Services Web site. Previously, Pennsylvanians could become registered organ donors when obtaining or renewing a driver's license or photo identification card - a process that, for most people, occurs every four years. Currently, 43 percent of licensed drivers and photo identification holders in Pennsylvania are registered organ donors, according to state officials.
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