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Organ Donation

NEWS
January 11, 2002 | By James M. DuBois
Last month, the American Medical Association entertained changes to the way we understand organ donation. Whereas organ donation has always been viewed as a gift, the AMA suggested that we investigate offering financial incentives to encourage organ donation. The proposal was inspired in part by a questionable statistic: that only about a third of all eligible donors agree to donate their organs. In fact, donation rates are most reliably assessed at a regional level, and in some regions considerable majorities consent to donation.
NEWS
May 1, 2001
Protection for fetuses? Congress's concern for life would be funny if it weren't so hypocritical. These protectors of the "unborn," these champions of life, voted against national health care for children, Head Start and school lunch programs. Save those fetuses, but once they're born, let them starve! These are the same people who voted to cut back welfare benefits to women with children (although corporate welfare is fine) but have nothing to say about making deadbeat dads pay for the children they helped create.
NEWS
April 20, 2001
U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson has launched a nationwide effort to increase the supply of human organs available for transplantation. Although the number of organs donated last year was nearly 23,000 - up 5.3 percent over 1999 - the number of people on the national waiting list has been growing even faster. It was about 76,000 in 2000, up more than 10 percent over the previous year. The HHS plan calls on companies, unions and other organizations to stimulate donations of organs from their members.
NEWS
January 22, 2001 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Rev. Dayle Malloy discovered that it would be possible for her to donate a kidney to her husband, Dick, the decision took no time at all. "It seemed like the most natural thing in the world to me," she said. But because donating an organ is not so natural for others, Pastor Malloy, 53, an associate at Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church in Lansdale, also will donate her experience to try to persuade them. "It is such a blessing and gift that we can give," she said of the opportunity to educate her 5,700-member congregation.
LIVING
November 12, 2000 | By Brendan January, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anthony Yeni has a new liver and a new purpose. "Before, I didn't know why I had been given a second chance," the Cherry Hill resident said. "Now, I know it's to go out to speak and educate. " Yeni's drive is common among organ recipients, and many of them are out this weekend - Donor Sabbath Weekend - speaking for what they call "the gift of life. " The message is going out in hundreds of sanctuaries across the country in an effort to raise awareness of organ donation and reassure worshipers that they don't need their organs to make it to heaven.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was young and full of energy, yet Philadelphia Police Officer Jose M. Ortiz had faced his own mortality. When he renewed his driver's license, he checked the organ-donation box. And he told his wife, Theresa, a nurse, that if he died, she was to see that his organs were made available. His wishes have been followed. Ortiz, 29, died Thursday night, three days after being hit by a police cruiser that was rushing to assist him as he chased a suspect in the Fairhill section of North Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gloria Campisi contributed to this report
His body was too broken, too bruised beyond repair to continue to live on in this world. But Philadelphia Police Officer Jose Ortiz will live on as a "guardian angel," as an example to other police officers - and in those he saves through organ donation. Last night, just hours after his wife made the heartbreaking decision to take Ortiz off life support, a painstaking, hourslong organ-harvesting process began at Temple University Hospital, in the hopes the young officer's death would not be in vain.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Spurred by the relentless encouragement of one of his constituents, Rep. James C. Greenwood has introduced legislation to create a five-year, $125 million pilot program to increase organ donation, including a federally funded life-insurance program for people who agree to donate their organs when they die. The bill means at least a partial victory for Eugene Epstein, a retired Bucks County businessman who has spent nearly three years and more...
NEWS
June 12, 1999
End organ waiting list Pennsylvania's recent effort to pass legislation to become the first state to provide a financial reward for organ donation underscores an unavoidable reality in America: Each day, 10 people on the national waiting list die because they do not receive the organs they need. Rather than try to solve the organ shortage through monetary funds, we should turn our attention toward the real root of the problem. Many of the patients who die awaiting a transplant would live if the families of most medically eligible donors would say yes to donation.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | by Jerome Groopman
I recently helped a family friend in his quest for a liver transplant. He suffered from long-standing hepatitis and would die without a new organ. I directed him to an outstanding transplant center in New York. Like all transplant candidates, my friend entered a race against death where the finish line keeps changing. No one knows when a liver will become available because of the scarcity of organs. For three months, my friend steadily deteriorated. On the brink of coma, he received the organ.
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