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Organizer

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LIVING
October 9, 1998 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are 55 children at the residential treatment center where Derrick, 11, lives. He is protective of the younger ones and will crouch down to their level to talk, and take their hands and help them look for things they have lost. If they fall off their bikes, he'll run to brush them off and make them laugh. He likes to be helpful in many ways. He's a good organizer. When he picks up toys, he'll put dolls in one place and little cars in another. And he keeps his room clean. Derrick has made the honor roll in his special-education classes; they are taught at about a fourth-grade level.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph C. Nettleton, 83, who helped organize the meat cutters union in the Philadelphia-Camden area in 1939 and served in numerous capacities before retiring in 1978, died Monday in Farmington Hills, Mich., where he had lived since 1989. A Camden native, Mr. Nettleton was a city councilman there from 1966 to 1975. He was a longtime member of the Camden City Planning Board, serving eight years as chairman. He also served on the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment and the Citizens' Advisory Board to the Camden City Board of Education.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Omjasisa Kentu, born Louis K. Kearney, 52, a relentless advocate for the political empowerment of African Americans, died of a stroke Friday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. "Kentu was a passionate man who loved Philadelphia and his community," former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. said Tuesday, and who worked hard, Goode added, to help the people of his native North Philadelphia. Mr. Kentu's future may have been forged on a crisp fall day in November 1967, when he was beaten by police while participating in a demonstration outside Philadelphia School District headquarters.
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Sam Nocella Sr., a retired vice president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers of America and a member of the labor movement for more than a half-century, died Thursday. He was 82 and lived in Southampton, Bucks County. When Nocella retired in 1982, he also was manager of the Baltimore Region's Joint Board. He was recognized as one of the earliest in the textile industry to warn of the increasing danger to the domestic economy of foreign imports and was considered a pioneer in bringing about fringe benefits, including day care for working mothers.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Alfred Junior "Al" Jiles, an organizer for Local 56 of the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, died Sunday of a heart attack. He was 58 and lived in Wyndmoor, Montgomery County. Jiles had been an organizer for the union for more than 20 years. Educated in the Ardmore, Okla., public schools, he was a 1958 graduate of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Deborah Jiles, one of his daughters, said her father was highly regarded in the union and the community.
SPORTS
August 12, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Riders in cycling's Tour of Galicia in Spain refused to contest yesterday's stage as a sign of respect to a race organizer who died after crashing his motorcycle while trying to warn riders of an obstacle. Jesus Presa, 40, died yesterday of head injuries sustained after colliding Tuesday with Italian rider Denis Zanette. Zanette suffered minor injuries. After riding most of today's 190-kilometer stage at normal speed, the riders consulted organizers and decided to cross the finish line without the traditional sprint for victory.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists. He served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell. He was a key supporter for former City Councilman Angel Ortiz and the coalition that elected Mayor W. Wilson Goode.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Always looking for a better way to efficiently organize the contents of our luggage, we've used nylon cubes and lift-out fabric shelves. Now, the folks at Pack Gear have combined the two concepts to create an organizer system especially designed and sized for carry-on bags and backpacks. The Carry-On Traveler is a four-tier nylon shelf system, with see-through mesh zippered covers sealing in the three front-facing tiers. The uppermost tier opens from the top via an opaque zippered cover.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Services have been set for Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, who died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists, and served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shafik Asante, 49, a community activist and organizer, died at Graduate Hospital on Friday after a long fight with bone cancer. Mr. Asante, also known as Shafik Abu-Tahir, was born in West Philadelphia. His grandfather, Emmanuel Wyatt, was the president and cofounder of the Haddington Leadership Organization, an organization that Mr. Asante later chaired. Mr. Asante attended West Philadelphia High School, Wilberforce College in Ohio, the Philadelphia College of the Bible, and Antioch University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The prosecutor asked for a five-year term. The defendant, in a plea deal, agreed to that. Millions were stolen, a reputed member of the mob already had received a 30-year term, and the judge was known to be tough. So what happened in federal court in Camden on Thursday was unexpected. U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler turned to Cory Leshner; called him a "good person" with no criminal history; noted that the 33-year-old defendant with a law degree had a wife who was expecting their second child, a supportive family, and a job waiting for him; and sentenced him to a two-year term.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Labor Day inaugurates the political season for unions that muster their organizational power to campaign for pro-labor candidates. For Laurel Brennan, the highest-ranking female labor leader in New Jersey, this year's effort is especially meaningful. "I feel a deep sense of pride and satisfaction," said Brennan, 64, secretary- treasurer of the New Jersey State AFL-CIO, talking about the possibility that the nation will elect its first female president. "A woman in the White House will be a positive role model and inspire women to realize their own value," Brennan said.
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITER jterruso@phillynews.com 215-854-5506 @juliaterruso
Richard Washington already spends much of his time at James Logan Elementary School in North Philadelphia. The 43-year-old community organizer helps run youth basketball, chess club, and choir, and he volunteers in the cafeteria, at recess, and as a crossing guard. Now he'll go from part-time volunteer to full-time employee. Logan is one of nine schools selected to adopt a Community School model, and Washington will coordinate its transition. "Logan's kind of a hidden secret.
NEWS
September 3, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
The organs of an 8-year-old girl who was fatally shot while playing across the street from her Camden home last week have been donated, including her liver, which went to a cousin. Also, Gabrielle Hill Carter's mother, Meresa Carter Phillips, gave birth to another child Tuesday, and named him King Gabriel. Gabrielle was playing on the sidewalk just before 8:30 p.m. Aug. 24 across from her house on the 900 block of South Eighth Street when several men opened fire on another man. One of the bullets struck her in the head.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, STAFF WRITER
Ray Quick's father, Clarence, made a name for himself as a founding member of the Del-Vikings, a pioneering, Pittsburgh-based doo-wop quintet that was among the first racially integrated singing groups of the 1950s. Clarence Quick penned the group's biggest hits, including "Come Go With Me" - the tune John Lennon's band the Quarrymen was playing at a Liverpool church in 1957 when Paul McCartney first noticed him, according to Beatles lore. As magical as those moments are, they are not why Ray Quick most remembers his father and devotes his life's work to his memory.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The party's over, the painted donkeys are headed home, and all that remains is an arena to put back together, some bookkeeping, and a few hundred thank-you notes to be written. The week after the Democratic National Convention, local organizers were still basking in kudos while closing down the pop-up organization they created to run the show. "You work so hard for something, you put your heart and soul into it, and you wonder how's it going to be received," said Kevin Washo, 35, executive director of the city's host committee.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
Curtis encores. The main classical season may be over, but you can revisit some high points from recent performances at the Curtis Institute of Music via videos on the school's website. Captured is a nicely developing interpretation by Bolai Cao of the Brahms Piano Sonata No. 1 in C Major , a Mahler Symphony No. 5 conducted by Jahja Ling, a Mendelssohn quartet, Gershwin and Strauss vocal works, as well as new music. When you've had enough of organized sound, click on a performance by a cellist and pianist of Cage's 4'33 . " Strangely, the performance lasts a bit more than five minutes.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
For Robin Larocca, her lungs ravaged by a rare disease, the options were disappearing quickly. In three months, her doctors said, she would be too sick for the transplant she needed to save her life. In a year or so, she would likely be dead. There appeared to be no available match, particularly because Larocca needed a double transplant rather than the more common single lung. Then doctors at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania offered her a chance to be in a clinical trial of a process that allows surgeons to better assess and eventually, perhaps, fix an organ that otherwise would have been rejected.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Rashad Robinson
  'Look at my African American over here. " When Donald Trump pointed out a black man at a California rally, social media erupted: Here was a man running the most racist campaign in decades trying to use the language of diversity for electoral gain. But here's a dirty little secret: Trump's contradictions when it comes to black people are the norm in American politics. Politicians on both sides of the aisle have long used black communities as pawns in their political chess game, each capitalizing on the symbolism of "blackness" to serve their parties' electoral needs.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
A few months after her first forays into political activism, Brianna Jones spotted a problem. A project manager by trade, Jones was inspired by Sen. Bernie Sanders' presidential run, and was upset by corporate money in politics. Eager to get involved, she met grassroots organizers who struck her as committed, diligent, and passionate. The problem? None of them were talking to each other. "I wanted to amplify what the grassroots were already doing," she said. "And a lot of these groups are more complementary than they think.
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