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Organizer

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LIVING
October 9, 1998 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are 55 children at the residential treatment center where Derrick, 11, lives. He is protective of the younger ones and will crouch down to their level to talk, and take their hands and help them look for things they have lost. If they fall off their bikes, he'll run to brush them off and make them laugh. He likes to be helpful in many ways. He's a good organizer. When he picks up toys, he'll put dolls in one place and little cars in another. And he keeps his room clean. Derrick has made the honor roll in his special-education classes; they are taught at about a fourth-grade level.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph C. Nettleton, 83, who helped organize the meat cutters union in the Philadelphia-Camden area in 1939 and served in numerous capacities before retiring in 1978, died Monday in Farmington Hills, Mich., where he had lived since 1989. A Camden native, Mr. Nettleton was a city councilman there from 1966 to 1975. He was a longtime member of the Camden City Planning Board, serving eight years as chairman. He also served on the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment and the Citizens' Advisory Board to the Camden City Board of Education.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Omjasisa Kentu, born Louis K. Kearney, 52, a relentless advocate for the political empowerment of African Americans, died of a stroke Friday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. "Kentu was a passionate man who loved Philadelphia and his community," former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. said Tuesday, and who worked hard, Goode added, to help the people of his native North Philadelphia. Mr. Kentu's future may have been forged on a crisp fall day in November 1967, when he was beaten by police while participating in a demonstration outside Philadelphia School District headquarters.
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Sam Nocella Sr., a retired vice president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers of America and a member of the labor movement for more than a half-century, died Thursday. He was 82 and lived in Southampton, Bucks County. When Nocella retired in 1982, he also was manager of the Baltimore Region's Joint Board. He was recognized as one of the earliest in the textile industry to warn of the increasing danger to the domestic economy of foreign imports and was considered a pioneer in bringing about fringe benefits, including day care for working mothers.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Alfred Junior "Al" Jiles, an organizer for Local 56 of the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, died Sunday of a heart attack. He was 58 and lived in Wyndmoor, Montgomery County. Jiles had been an organizer for the union for more than 20 years. Educated in the Ardmore, Okla., public schools, he was a 1958 graduate of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Deborah Jiles, one of his daughters, said her father was highly regarded in the union and the community.
SPORTS
August 12, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Riders in cycling's Tour of Galicia in Spain refused to contest yesterday's stage as a sign of respect to a race organizer who died after crashing his motorcycle while trying to warn riders of an obstacle. Jesus Presa, 40, died yesterday of head injuries sustained after colliding Tuesday with Italian rider Denis Zanette. Zanette suffered minor injuries. After riding most of today's 190-kilometer stage at normal speed, the riders consulted organizers and decided to cross the finish line without the traditional sprint for victory.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Always looking for a better way to efficiently organize the contents of our luggage, we've used nylon cubes and lift-out fabric shelves. Now, the folks at Pack Gear have combined the two concepts to create an organizer system especially designed and sized for carry-on bags and backpacks. The Carry-On Traveler is a four-tier nylon shelf system, with see-through mesh zippered covers sealing in the three front-facing tiers. The uppermost tier opens from the top via an opaque zippered cover.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Services have been set for Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, who died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists, and served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shafik Asante, 49, a community activist and organizer, died at Graduate Hospital on Friday after a long fight with bone cancer. Mr. Asante, also known as Shafik Abu-Tahir, was born in West Philadelphia. His grandfather, Emmanuel Wyatt, was the president and cofounder of the Haddington Leadership Organization, an organization that Mr. Asante later chaired. Mr. Asante attended West Philadelphia High School, Wilberforce College in Ohio, the Philadelphia College of the Bible, and Antioch University.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists. He served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell. He was a key supporter for former City Councilman Angel Ortiz and the coalition that elected Mayor W. Wilson Goode.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
Amid heightened tensions after a fatal sniper attack on police in Dallas, Mayor Kenney on Friday called on all sides to "listen and to be willing to hear one another. " "I ask all Philadelphians not to react in hate, anger, or violence, but instead to grieve with the nation by listening to one another," Kenney said in a statement. But area police officers reacted with outrage to the news from Dallas that five officers had been fatally shot and seven others wounded as protesters marched in response to the killings of two black men by police in Louisiana and Minnesota.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Always looking for a better way to efficiently organize the contents of our luggage, we've used nylon cubes and lift-out fabric shelves. Now, the folks at Pack Gear have combined the two concepts to create an organizer system especially designed and sized for carry-on bags and backpacks. The Carry-On Traveler is a four-tier nylon shelf system, with see-through mesh zippered covers sealing in the three front-facing tiers. The uppermost tier opens from the top via an opaque zippered cover.
NEWS
July 3, 2016
A structured walking program that offered encouragement and support improved participants' mood and energy levels and even led to the shedding of a few pounds, a study by Independence Blue Cross found. The research, which was published June 27 in the American Journal of Health Promotion, involved about 460 randomly chosen employees. Half the participants worked for companies insured by IBC with managers who typically put up posters or offered other passive walking encouragement.
SPORTS
June 5, 2016 | By Paul Schwedelson, STAFF WRITER
LONG POND, Pa. - Joey Gase had only a matter of hours to decide. His mother, Mary Jo, died of a brain aneurysm in April 2011 and thousands of things were on his mind. Before, he was focused on racing, going to the prom, and graduating from high school. Gase hadn't spoken with his mother about becoming an organ donor. Because his parents were divorced, Gase was next of kin, meaning he'd have to sign the paperwork. After discussing the matter with family, his mother's organs were donated.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
SARAH S. PONDER, 96, an accountant, financial secretary, and longtime South Philadelphian known as "Sissy" or "Sis" to family members, died Saturday, May 7, at Good Shepherd Penn Partners at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Ponder was born on Sept. 21, 1919, in Hopewell, Va., to James and Anna Belle Smith. Her family moved to Philadelphia when she was an infant, and she attended public schools, graduating from South Philadelphia High School in 1936. She then took accounting classes at Temple University before joining the staff of Union Baptist Church in 1938.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Some traveled from as far as the Bronx. Others made their way to the Gloucester Premium Outlets from Philadelphia or Atlantic City. But instead of shopping, they were stealing, police said Tuesday in announcing the arrests of six people over the last week. "This is more than going in and stealing clothes out of a Target," said Gloucester Township Police Capt. Anthony Minosse. "This is organized crime. " The six were using sophisticated equipment and devices to help them walk out with expensive shoes and designer clothes, Minosse said.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
More than $2.6 million was awarded Wednesday to 284 arts and cultural organizations around the city by the Philadelphia Cultural Fund, about the same number as last year. Of those, 20 are receiving their first grants, fund officials said. Since its founding in 1991, the fund has distributed $40 million in unrestricted operating funds to hundreds of groups, large and small. The fund also announced that the Georgia E. Gregory Interdenominational School of Music is winner of the Councilman David Cohen Award, a noncash award recognizing an arts organization for its economic and social justice work.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Maddie Hanna, STAFF WRITERS
This is how confident Donald Trump's Pennsylvania supporters are that he'll coast to victory Tuesday: Confident enough to spend the final stretch mastering the impenetrable rules that govern the Republican National Convention, lining up hundreds of poll workers, and strategizing about their real challenge - getting voters to cast primary ballots next week for pro-Trump delegates. "He's going to win the popular vote without question," said Phyllis Zemble, a former Lower Merion Township commissioner and Democrat who turned Republican to vote for Trump.
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