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LIVING
October 9, 1998 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are 55 children at the residential treatment center where Derrick, 11, lives. He is protective of the younger ones and will crouch down to their level to talk, and take their hands and help them look for things they have lost. If they fall off their bikes, he'll run to brush them off and make them laugh. He likes to be helpful in many ways. He's a good organizer. When he picks up toys, he'll put dolls in one place and little cars in another. And he keeps his room clean. Derrick has made the honor roll in his special-education classes; they are taught at about a fourth-grade level.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph C. Nettleton, 83, who helped organize the meat cutters union in the Philadelphia-Camden area in 1939 and served in numerous capacities before retiring in 1978, died Monday in Farmington Hills, Mich., where he had lived since 1989. A Camden native, Mr. Nettleton was a city councilman there from 1966 to 1975. He was a longtime member of the Camden City Planning Board, serving eight years as chairman. He also served on the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment and the Citizens' Advisory Board to the Camden City Board of Education.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Omjasisa Kentu, born Louis K. Kearney, 52, a relentless advocate for the political empowerment of African Americans, died of a stroke Friday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. "Kentu was a passionate man who loved Philadelphia and his community," former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. said Tuesday, and who worked hard, Goode added, to help the people of his native North Philadelphia. Mr. Kentu's future may have been forged on a crisp fall day in November 1967, when he was beaten by police while participating in a demonstration outside Philadelphia School District headquarters.
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Sam Nocella Sr., a retired vice president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers of America and a member of the labor movement for more than a half-century, died Thursday. He was 82 and lived in Southampton, Bucks County. When Nocella retired in 1982, he also was manager of the Baltimore Region's Joint Board. He was recognized as one of the earliest in the textile industry to warn of the increasing danger to the domestic economy of foreign imports and was considered a pioneer in bringing about fringe benefits, including day care for working mothers.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Alfred Junior "Al" Jiles, an organizer for Local 56 of the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, died Sunday of a heart attack. He was 58 and lived in Wyndmoor, Montgomery County. Jiles had been an organizer for the union for more than 20 years. Educated in the Ardmore, Okla., public schools, he was a 1958 graduate of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Deborah Jiles, one of his daughters, said her father was highly regarded in the union and the community.
SPORTS
August 12, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Riders in cycling's Tour of Galicia in Spain refused to contest yesterday's stage as a sign of respect to a race organizer who died after crashing his motorcycle while trying to warn riders of an obstacle. Jesus Presa, 40, died yesterday of head injuries sustained after colliding Tuesday with Italian rider Denis Zanette. Zanette suffered minor injuries. After riding most of today's 190-kilometer stage at normal speed, the riders consulted organizers and decided to cross the finish line without the traditional sprint for victory.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists. He served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell. He was a key supporter for former City Councilman Angel Ortiz and the coalition that elected Mayor W. Wilson Goode.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Services have been set for Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, who died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists, and served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shafik Asante, 49, a community activist and organizer, died at Graduate Hospital on Friday after a long fight with bone cancer. Mr. Asante, also known as Shafik Abu-Tahir, was born in West Philadelphia. His grandfather, Emmanuel Wyatt, was the president and cofounder of the Haddington Leadership Organization, an organization that Mr. Asante later chaired. Mr. Asante attended West Philadelphia High School, Wilberforce College in Ohio, the Philadelphia College of the Bible, and Antioch University.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rose F. Staub, 101, a longtime resident of the city's Lawndale section who moved South more than 40 years ago to pursue an often-dangerous career as a union organizer, died Sunday in a St. Petersburg, Fla., nursing home. While raising a son and daughter with her husband, Charles E. Staub, Mrs. Staub began a job as a seamstress in a Nicetown textile mill. Appalled by working conditions there, she became a union business agent, said her grandson, Charles E. Staub 2d. In the early 1950s, after her husband's death, she moved to Florida, eventually settling in Tampa.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 2016
Name: Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau, Center City. Business: Markets, books, and facilitates convention, group, international travel. 2015 revenue: $19 million (est.), mostly from hotel room and hospitality taxes. Employees: 62. Big in 2016: Democratic National Convention, 40,000; African Methodist Episcopal Church Bicentennial, 30,000.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia region has a new crop of accountable-care organizations aiming to reduce the cost of caring for Medicare beneficiaries while improving quality by emphasizing coordination by doctors and other providers. If the accountable-care organizations reduce costs beyond targets while meeting quality criteria, the government shares savings with them. Genesis Healthcare Inc., a major nursing-home owner based in Kennett Square, has formed Genesis Healthcare ACO, which covers nine states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Atlantic City's history is a stupendous symphony of superlatives, a tale of how "America's Queen of Resorts" wowed the masses with the most, the best, the greatest. There's also . . . the Boardwalk Hall Pipe Organ. "It's the world's largest musical instrument," organ scholar, builder, and showman Steven Ball declares. "The sonic Mount Rushmore," says Ball, whose official title is organist and director of outreach for the Historic Organ Restoration Committee Inc. "It was designed to be a library of all sound.
FOOD
September 25, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Making good blue cheese isn't easy. After a first batch of beginner's luck, Amos Miller at Misty Creek Dairy in Leola, Pa., spent nearly two years flailing at subsequent blues that "even the pigs wouldn't eat. " Thankfully, with the help of a consultant and some pristine raw milk from Eli Esh's Millwood Springs Organic in Willow Street, he is now making a blue under Millwood's name that has become one of the best examples in Pennsylvania....
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia is promised to be the city's largest event in decades, but amid severe security and transit restrictions, organizers launched an effort Wednesday to ensure that the expected crowds show up. The "I'll Be There!" campaign was announced by the World Meeting of Families 2015 at a news conference/pep rally outside Jack's Firehouse restaurant in Fairmount. Mayor Nutter denied that the new push was a response to anticipated drop-off in attendance, though he did say hotel rooms are still available for the weekend.
SPORTS
August 21, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
JOINT PRACTICES are "organized chaos," Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins said after the first of the three days of welcoming the Baltimore Ravens to NovaCare, in advance of Saturday's preseason game. "Both teams are teetering on being under control, but out of control at the same time. It's real thin ice, but I think cooler heads prevail. We're all professionals. We're out here trying to compete. I think we all have that understanding and mutual respect for each other, and we're out here just trying to get work done.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Thursday, 4,500 people dressed in white, having paid for the privilege of lugging their own tables, chairs, and picnic dinners, will gather at an as-yet-undisclosed location in Philadelphia, then ceremoniously wave their napkins and share a meal. It's the fourth annual Diner en Blanc, Philadelphia - a radical act of public dining that has been polarizing in a city where the preferred alfresco meal is still a cheesesteak. Yet, 30,000 people have joined a wait-list (those who previously attended or were invited get first dibs)
BUSINESS
July 31, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust, owner of Exton Square Mall in Chester County, plans to demolish the site's Kmart building and replace it with a large-format organic grocery store. PREIT chief executive Joseph Coradino told analysts in a conference call Wednesday that the grocer would be named in the coming days. A lease for 55,000 square feet has been executed, he said. Philadelphia-based PREIT also has identified a dine-in movie theater and a bowling-and-entertainment center as prospective tenants for the former site of a 118,000-square-foot J.C. Penney Co. store at Exton Square, Coradino said.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | BY CHRISSY RIVERA
TODAY, I WILL NOT need to stop at the cemetery to visit the grave of my little girl. Nor will I have to escort her to dialysis appointments, emotionally draining visits to the ER, or endure any long hospital stays. It was not long ago, however, when I feared those excursions would become a routine and I was terrified I'd eventually be spending a good deal of my time grieving for my daughter in a cemetery. But today, instead of walking into a quiet, lifeless house after work, I will enter a home full of love and be greeted by my precious child who was never supposed to live.
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