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Organizer

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LIVING
October 9, 1998 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are 55 children at the residential treatment center where Derrick, 11, lives. He is protective of the younger ones and will crouch down to their level to talk, and take their hands and help them look for things they have lost. If they fall off their bikes, he'll run to brush them off and make them laugh. He likes to be helpful in many ways. He's a good organizer. When he picks up toys, he'll put dolls in one place and little cars in another. And he keeps his room clean. Derrick has made the honor roll in his special-education classes; they are taught at about a fourth-grade level.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph C. Nettleton, 83, who helped organize the meat cutters union in the Philadelphia-Camden area in 1939 and served in numerous capacities before retiring in 1978, died Monday in Farmington Hills, Mich., where he had lived since 1989. A Camden native, Mr. Nettleton was a city councilman there from 1966 to 1975. He was a longtime member of the Camden City Planning Board, serving eight years as chairman. He also served on the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment and the Citizens' Advisory Board to the Camden City Board of Education.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Omjasisa Kentu, born Louis K. Kearney, 52, a relentless advocate for the political empowerment of African Americans, died of a stroke Friday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. "Kentu was a passionate man who loved Philadelphia and his community," former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. said Tuesday, and who worked hard, Goode added, to help the people of his native North Philadelphia. Mr. Kentu's future may have been forged on a crisp fall day in November 1967, when he was beaten by police while participating in a demonstration outside Philadelphia School District headquarters.
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Sam Nocella Sr., a retired vice president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers of America and a member of the labor movement for more than a half-century, died Thursday. He was 82 and lived in Southampton, Bucks County. When Nocella retired in 1982, he also was manager of the Baltimore Region's Joint Board. He was recognized as one of the earliest in the textile industry to warn of the increasing danger to the domestic economy of foreign imports and was considered a pioneer in bringing about fringe benefits, including day care for working mothers.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Alfred Junior "Al" Jiles, an organizer for Local 56 of the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, died Sunday of a heart attack. He was 58 and lived in Wyndmoor, Montgomery County. Jiles had been an organizer for the union for more than 20 years. Educated in the Ardmore, Okla., public schools, he was a 1958 graduate of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Deborah Jiles, one of his daughters, said her father was highly regarded in the union and the community.
SPORTS
August 12, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Riders in cycling's Tour of Galicia in Spain refused to contest yesterday's stage as a sign of respect to a race organizer who died after crashing his motorcycle while trying to warn riders of an obstacle. Jesus Presa, 40, died yesterday of head injuries sustained after colliding Tuesday with Italian rider Denis Zanette. Zanette suffered minor injuries. After riding most of today's 190-kilometer stage at normal speed, the riders consulted organizers and decided to cross the finish line without the traditional sprint for victory.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists. He served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell. He was a key supporter for former City Councilman Angel Ortiz and the coalition that elected Mayor W. Wilson Goode.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Services have been set for Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, who died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists, and served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shafik Asante, 49, a community activist and organizer, died at Graduate Hospital on Friday after a long fight with bone cancer. Mr. Asante, also known as Shafik Abu-Tahir, was born in West Philadelphia. His grandfather, Emmanuel Wyatt, was the president and cofounder of the Haddington Leadership Organization, an organization that Mr. Asante later chaired. Mr. Asante attended West Philadelphia High School, Wilberforce College in Ohio, the Philadelphia College of the Bible, and Antioch University.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rose F. Staub, 101, a longtime resident of the city's Lawndale section who moved South more than 40 years ago to pursue an often-dangerous career as a union organizer, died Sunday in a St. Petersburg, Fla., nursing home. While raising a son and daughter with her husband, Charles E. Staub, Mrs. Staub began a job as a seamstress in a Nicetown textile mill. Appalled by working conditions there, she became a union business agent, said her grandson, Charles E. Staub 2d. In the early 1950s, after her husband's death, she moved to Florida, eventually settling in Tampa.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Imagine a version of American Idol in which the contestants can sabotage one another in order to win and you get the gist of Bach at Leipzig , a thrill-ride of a comedy now playing at People's Light & Theatre. But that capsule description can't capture the magnitude of humor and the multiplicity of events depicted in Itamar Moses' clever play. It's 1722, and Johann Kuhnau, the world's greatest organist and music director of Leipzig's Thomaskirche, has died without appointing a successor.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
As expected, the organizations that set national organ allocation policy on Monday permanently adopted the temporary rule change that enabled then-10-year-old Sarah Murnaghan of Newtown Square to receive adult lungs a year ago. In a statement, the board of directors of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing said the change would expand access only "for a very limited group of young lung transplant candidates....
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Patrick is all of 23. And on Tuesday, the Jamison, Bucks County, native joined the likes of Walter Cronkite and Steve Jobs as the recipient of a national Jefferson Award for public service. Patrick helped raise more than $13.3 million for pediatric cancer this year by leading THON, Pennsylvania State University's dance marathon, the world's largest student-run philanthropy. For his work with THON, Patrick was awarded the Globechanger Award for a volunteer under 25 during a ceremony at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in Washington.
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of 15 area churches gathered at LOVE Park on Sunday to turn the social-media activism of #BringBackOurGirls into an old-fashioned protest rally - the kind with chants, prayers, and song. About 250 people held signs and wore T-shirts condemning last month's kidnapping of 234 girls who were taken from their school in Nigeria by the extremist group Boko Haram. "We say no to terrorism. We say no to Boko Haram," said Pastor Funmi Obilana from the podium. "We want peace. We want education.
NEWS
May 15, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Monica Forte sat in a House hearing room Tuesday, her son Tony wired to an IV in a backpack beside her, and tearfully begged lawmakers to pass a bill to update Pennsylvania's organ-donation law. "There are not enough kids as pediatric donors," Forte told a legislative panel. Tony, who turns 9 next month, was born with an intestinal disease and is on the waiting list for a stomach, liver, and small intestine transplant. He is one of 200 children on the state's waiting list for organ transplants.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
STILL TRAILING after his team played its best game of the series, a coach begins to search around this time for an X-factor to insert in his lineup. One such gift could have landed in Craig Berube's lap yesterday. After the Oshawa Generals were ousted from the OHL playoffs on Wednesday, the Flyers recalled first-round pick Scott Laughton yesterday. Laughton, 19, already has five games' NHL experience under his belt with the Flyers from the 2013 lockout-shortened season. Laughton was lauded for his defensive responsibility as an 18-year-old, making the decision tough for the Flyers to send him back to junior hockey.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
What do Laura Bush and Hillary Clinton agree on? They, like many other prominent Americans, talk effusively about helping Afghan women. The fate of Afghan women is also a subject that grabs the attention of Americans who have otherwise lost interest in that country. When Afghans voted last week, much of the U.S. media coverage focused on lines of burka-clad female voters at the polls. So let's assume (and it's far from certain) that this interest in Afghan women is genuine and will outlast the U.S. troop exit at the end of 2014.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Jerry Iannelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Amira Davis, 9, sits near the front of her fourth-grade classroom each day at Aldan Elementary School in Delaware County. She can read each word when her teacher spells out lessons in thick, glossy strokes of black marker on the room's central whiteboard. But, she recently told her mother, when her teacher fires up the room's overhead projector, Amira has to squint to make out the words. "If she didn't mention that she couldn't see the board, we never would have come today," Amira's mother, Amber Lozado, said.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Walmart, the nation's largest grocer, is partnering with health-food provider Wild Oats to offer a line of reduced-price organic-food products at its stores nationwide. By offering organic products at prices comparable to nonorganic national brands, Walmart can be expected to put considerable price pressure on organic products across the board. "We don't think consumers should have to pay high prices to put food on their families' tables," said Jack Sinclair, executive vice president of Walmart's grocery division.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ALBERT E. STEWART was a community organizer who helped countless poor and marginalized Philadelphians with housing and other problems, but, basically, he was a musician. "He believed in the revolutionary power of music," his family said. And he took that revolution throughout the U.S. and as far away as South Africa with a booming voice full of emotion. He traveled to the Midwest with the Philadelphia Boys Choir and sang in South Africa with a group that his family said performed for Nelson Mandela.
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