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NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was March 25, 2010, and Andrew McIntyre had just become a father. His mind was on his newborn girl, but he was also thinking about his own dad, who died of complications from emphysema when McIntyre was 4. "It brought my father back to me in a way I had not anticipated," McIntyre said. "I wanted him in the waiting room, more so than when I got married or graduated. " Having his own child inspired McIntyre, a West Chester native, to help bereaved children in the area. Last fall, he launched the W.H. McIntyre Foundation.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Mark Tyler awoke before dawn Tuesday, invigorated by the giant protest that had shut down Center City the previous day - and ready to confront the question on everyone's mind: What's next? Through weeks of planning, he and other organizers promised the Martin Luther King's Birthday march would be just the start, the public launch of a new movement to bring concrete change to Philadelphia. But protest can be a limited tactic, and even the best-led social movements can fizzle.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
At some city public schools, there is no recess at all - deep budget cuts mean there are not enough adults to monitor students' playtime. But at McMichael Elementary in Mantua, children troop out onto the schoolyard in orderly lines, pledge to be respectful and kind, then break out into orderly but joyous games of football, dodgeball and foursquare - blowing off steam with a genial man known as Coach Steve. McMichael is one of 13 Philadelphia School District schools and three city charters that use Playworks, a nonprofit that places a full-time staffer in schools to structure recess.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
M om's Organic Market , a Maryland-based chain, is planning a new Center City grocery at 34 S. 11th St. in Philadelphia's new East Market development. Like a more intimate Whole Foods fit into a Trader Joe's -sized 16,000 square-foot space, Mom's is designed to help draw the young and retired professionals to the four-acre block of planned new and renovated stores, apartments, offices, bars and restaurants bounded by Market, Chestnut, 11th, and 12th Streets. East Market's investors include National Real Estate Advisors L.L.C.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MUSLIMS Mobilized Against Police Brutality, a new organization in Philadelphia, expects hundreds of participants at a march and rally tomorrow in Center City. The event, organized by the Muslim Wellness Foundation, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative and United Muslim Masjid, will begin at noon at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard. Kameelah Mu'Min Rashad, a coordinator, said the demonstration is designed to address police brutality directed against the black community. "Over the course of the last few weeks, we've been talking pointedly and having discussions about the political and social and legal implications of the events around Ferguson and New York and the psychological trauma evident in the black community as a result," she said.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | BY MARY S. LAVER
  POPE FRANCIS won't arrive in Philadelphia until September, when the World Meeting of Families convenes. But it's not too soon for local Catholics - and people of all faiths - to start thinking about what to share with him when he comes. Philadelphia could offer Pope Francis a tour of shelters, soup kitchens and other programs in which people with resources (holiday toys, winter coats, tutoring, etc.) give to those without. But our region is also gaining a reputation for adopting another strategy to bridge growing social and economic gaps.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WHEN OFFICER Roslyn "Roz" Talley first toured the Widener Memorial School for children who are medically fragile and physically disabled - a school her own daughter would one day attend - she took pity on the kids she saw in the hallways and classrooms. "I'm not going to lie to you and tell you I didn't feel sorry for the children," Talley said. "It was sad to see so many kids in wheelchairs and walkers. " But it was a moment in the school's hallways that changed Talley's mind and helped her to see the students as kids and not just as special-needs children.
SPORTS
November 21, 2014 | By Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE IS a serious conflict going on in the 76ers organization and it's not between management and coach, coach and player or player and player. No, the biggest clash right now is a cultural one. It is a fight between the culture that the coach wants his young club to develop and the toxic one that management has created with this mostly non-NBA roster. The Plan is known, there isn't any hiding it. Lose now, accumulate high draft picks. Collect all of the second-round assets you can and live for the future, a future that Sam Hinkie and company are betting on being a rich one with eventual newcomers Joel Embiid, Dario Saric and whomever may be selected with those coming draft picks.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burton D. Shanker, 79, of West Windsor, N.J., former executive director of synagogues in South Jersey and beyond, died of a brain tumor Sunday, Nov. 16, at the Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro, N.J. At one point in his career, Mr. Shanker was also president of the North American Association of Synagogue Executives and executive director of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, his son Jeff said. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Shanker earned a bachelor's degree at Gratz College in religious studies and business operations.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The concerto portion of any Philadelphia Orchestra program tends to be blessedly predictable. Not this week. Three different organ concertos are scheduled on successive days through Saturday - not small amiable specimens by Handel, but large modern works, only two of three calling themselves concertos. First up was Joseph Jongen's 1927 Symphonie Concertante , a work written for the Wanamaker organ down the street at Macy's but not performed there until 2008. The difference at the Kimmel Center on Thursday was that you could actually hear this ambitious four-movement piece - in contrast to the wildly reverberant acoustic at Macy's.
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