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SPORTS
November 21, 2014 | By Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE IS a serious conflict going on in the 76ers organization and it's not between management and coach, coach and player or player and player. No, the biggest clash right now is a cultural one. It is a fight between the culture that the coach wants his young club to develop and the toxic one that management has created with this mostly non-NBA roster. The Plan is known, there isn't any hiding it. Lose now, accumulate high draft picks. Collect all of the second-round assets you can and live for the future, a future that Sam Hinkie and company are betting on being a rich one with eventual newcomers Joel Embiid, Dario Saric and whomever may be selected with those coming draft picks.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burton D. Shanker, 79, of West Windsor, N.J., former executive director of synagogues in South Jersey and beyond, died of a brain tumor Sunday, Nov. 16, at the Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro, N.J. At one point in his career, Mr. Shanker was also president of the North American Association of Synagogue Executives and executive director of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, his son Jeff said. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Shanker earned a bachelor's degree at Gratz College in religious studies and business operations.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The concerto portion of any Philadelphia Orchestra program tends to be blessedly predictable. Not this week. Three different organ concertos are scheduled on successive days through Saturday - not small amiable specimens by Handel, but large modern works, only two of three calling themselves concertos. First up was Joseph Jongen's 1927 Symphonie Concertante , a work written for the Wanamaker organ down the street at Macy's but not performed there until 2008. The difference at the Kimmel Center on Thursday was that you could actually hear this ambitious four-movement piece - in contrast to the wildly reverberant acoustic at Macy's.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Having received no offers for a takeover, the organization that occupies the Prince Music Theater on Friday terminated its lease with the owners of the building on Chestnut Street just west of Broad Street. American Music Theater Festival, founded in 1984, also intends to dissolve. The future of the building is uncertain. "It's a significant loss if it goes away. If it becomes a drugstore, it would be horrible for the city," said J. Andrew Greenblatt, executive director of the Philadelphia Film Society, one of the theater's most frequent users.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Tekel, 94, of Center City, a retired La Salle University chemistry professor who as a graduate student contributed to the Manhattan Project - albeit without his knowledge - died Wednesday, Oct. 8, of pneumonia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to his daughter Billie Elias, in 1944 Dr. Tekel was part of a research team led by Dr. Henry Hass at Purdue University called Project 220. The team was asked to prepare Freon-like materials called fluorocarbons, Elias said.
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies named Johnny Almaraz as their amateur scouting director on Wednesday. Almaraz was the international scouting director for the Atlanta Braves. Almaraz, 49, replaces Marti Wolever, whose contract was not renewed last month. Wolever had been with the Phillies since November 1992 and served as the team's director of scouting since October 2001. During his time with the Braves, Almaraz signed righthander Julio Teheran and catcher Christian Bethancourt, among others. "In scouting, your track record speaks for itself, and it's a production business and he has signed a lot of big-leaguers, whether international or domestic," said Benny Looper, the Phillies' assistant general manager for player personnel.
REAL_ESTATE
September 28, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
  With fall here and winter on its way, it might be time to straighten out the garage, so you can at least find the snow shovels when you need them. "Will it be another bad winter, Al?" you ask. I'll tell you when it's over. In the meantime, the Lehigh Group, maker of Crawford brand garage and home-workshop organization products, recommends cleaning out the space originally designed for cars, suggesting that clutter there might mask hidden dangers. "Seventy percent of Americans use the garage to store potentially dangerous equipment such as saws and power tools, while nearly 60 percent store flammable liquids, such as oil, gasoline, propane and kerosene, as well as other dangerous chemicals, including pesticides and other lawn-care products in their garage space," the company says.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soggy conditions last weekend did not discourage crowds from gathering in New Hope and Doylestown to watch the Thompson Bucks County Classic on Saturday and the Criterium of Doylestown on Sunday. If anything, the rain underscored the events' success, according to John Eustice, the event director. "It was raining . . . and we still had a big crowd," Eustice said. "It's great that it rained, because it's proof that people loved the race. " On Saturday, about 200 men competed in a 100-mile race from Doylestown to New Hope for the international title of UCI Champion of the Americas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Throughout much of Macy's department store in Center City, "20 percent off" signs added to the celebratory air of Symphony in C's concert on Saturday night, scheduled immediately after closing time, in yet another of its mountain-comes-to-Muhammad collaborations with the fabled Wanamaker organ. Known as one of the biggest and grandest working instruments of its kind, the Wanamaker organ is mostly heard as a musical world unto itself in noontime concerts that range from classical to show tunes.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barry Ersek was a precocious lawn-care magnate. Steve Lange was a self-taught plant scientist at a Delaware bank that wanted brighter gardens. With 35 employees, they now run Holganix (as in holistic organics ), a Glen Mills company that manufactures liquid compost-starter - their brew of fermented, pasteurized and refrigerated sugars, bacteria and yeast - plus cooling units, jugs and applicators to spread it on lawns, farms and ballfields. Sales to NFL teams, Ivy League colleges, and landscaping services that want to use less chemical fertilizer and pest-killer nearly tripled in each of the last three years, to $4.4 million, landing Holganix on this year's Inc. 500 list of fast-growing U.S. firms.
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