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Organizer

NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Dylan Purcell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At once saddened and inspired by historic events unfolding in Ukraine, demonstrators solemnly gathered Sunday in Center City to bring attention to the loss of life in the Eastern European nation - and to pray for peace. About 200 people, assembling in Thomas Paine Plaza across from City Hall, had initially intended to mourn the loss of nearly 100 lives in Kiev. But news of the swift dismantling of President Viktor Yanukovych's government boosted spirits. "We are both mourning and celebrating," said Mary Kalyna, 59, an organizer who lives in West Mount Airy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
With his burly physique and woolly beard, Brandon Barnhart looks every inch the laid-back country kid from tiny West College Corner, Ind. But don't be fooled. This guy is driven. After eight years in the Air Force working on nuclear cruise missiles, Barnhart returned to civilian life in 2010 and immediately reenrolled at Indiana University to finish his undergraduate degree in general studies and history. And while he grew up around conventionally grown sweet corn, soybeans, and hay on his family's farm, he intends to do things his way - as an organic farmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Once again, the Kimmel Center's Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ emerged from its splendid semi-isolation with revelations at many turns Sunday with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia. Organ recitals have their audience, but recent collaborations have uncovered important but neglected repertoire and perhaps have expanded the organ audience. In Sunday's program of Handel, Josef Rheinberger, and Joseph Jongen (with four different soloists), the big discovery was Stephen Paulus' 1992 Concerto for Solo Organ, Timpani, and Percussion . It's a terrific piece that would have to rank among the best American organ concertos of the last century, with four hefty movements that strike out in many directions, from elegiac to comic, with equal conviction.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
As a mother-to-be in 2008, Jayme Bella had a lot going on in her life. A nor'easter that left her North Jersey home flooded and infested with flying insects only added to the chaos. And then, it set her on a course to entrepreneurship. Now living in Langhorne, Bella is the mother of two and chief operating officer of Greener Days L.L.C., founded in 2010 with her parents, Alan and Sharon Neiburg. The company's Greenerways Organic Bug Spray has garnered national and international sales and interest from QVC. There is a plan to launch a hand-and-surface spray cleaner in early 2014.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jennie Shanker committed to teaching two classes in sculpture at a Philadelphia college for the spring 2012 semester. She turned down other teaching offers to keep that commitment. One week before the semester began, the college abruptly canceled one of the classes because it was one student shy of its enrollment target. "That was half my income," said Shanker, who earns $3,000 to $5,000 per three-credit course. Such is the plight of an adjunct professor. Adjuncts work without benefits or job security, often for little pay and with no stable career path, though providing a substantial portion of the higher education workforce.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE WORD around Philadelphia's political, government and community circles was "Let Lana do it. " "If you want it done right, let Lana do it," was the cry. And whatever it was, no one would doubt that Lana Felton-Ghee would not only get it done, but that it would be done the best that anyone could do it. That ranged from political campaigns to civic celebrations, as well as cultural and a vast variety of community events, ranging from the...
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Louise Bernard Ellis, 79, of Mount Ephraim, a member since the 1990s of the Ladies Ancient Order of Hibernians, a charitable organization, died Wednesday, Nov. 20, at the Vitas Inpatient Hospice Unit of Kennedy Health System in Stratford following a stroke. Born in Gloucester City, Mrs. Ellis graduated from Gloucester Catholic High School in 1951, where she was a member of the glee club. She then worked as a part-time clerk for the post office in Gloucester Heights, where her mother was the postmistress, daughter Maureen Gorlewski said.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Inspired by the case of a young man with autism who was denied a place on a heart-transplant waiting list, a Philadelphia legislator will soon begin gathering support for a state bill that would prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities who want organ transplants. Rep. John Sabatina (D., Phila.) plans to introduce "Paul's Law" in honor of Paul Corby of Pottsville, whose mother, Karen, said doctors at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania refused to put him on the heart-transplant list because of his autism.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Within the first few minutes of the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia's 140th anniversary concert with the Kimmel Center organ, you wondered why the two aren't married with children. The two entities seem made for each other. The chorus' robust sound matches that of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ, which, in the hands of Michael Stairs, has a versatility that makes the instrument an accompanist in myriad ways, though it roars into the foreground at the right moments. The Friday program explored choral/organ works not often heard for reasons that seem to have little to do with their quality.
NEWS
October 8, 2013 | By Ben Finley and Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writers
PHILADELPHIA Wei Chen honed his organizing skills as a student during a boycott triggered by racial violence at South Philadelphia High School four years ago. On Sunday, he was awarded a fellowship that will help him continue organizing Asian youth. "Organizing is one of the best ways to change our society," said Chen, who grew up in China's Fujian Province, where organizing was not tolerated. Chen, 22, is one of 10 young people to receive the inaugural Peace First Prize, which is supported by various foundations and which celebrates those who have confronted injustice.
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