CollectionsOrigin
IN THE NEWS

Origin

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pianist Chick Corea walked in first and played a spell. Then his five Origin bandmates strolled in one by one, sometimes tapping on a tambourine or a percussion doodad before raising their instruments. For the next two hours, Corea's sextet would form and reform on stage, stripping down to a duo of piano and drums, then building up to a trio or the full roar of the band's three horns. The permutations kept unfolding Wednesday night at the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert.
NEWS
September 5, 2011
One of the many fascinating things about evolution is that it generates disputes that can help us all better understand what science is and how it differs from religion or other areas of human endeavor. Just such an enlightening dispute cropped up recently between two readers who were kind enough to let me share some of their correspondence. It all started when Elisa Winterstein wrote a letter to The Inquirer, stating that scientists rely on faith just as religious people do by accepting the idea of abiogenesis - the notion that life arose from non-living matter.
NEWS
January 14, 2007 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Letitia Smallwood, now 54, is serving a life sentence for a 1972 fire in a Cumberland County, Pa., apartment building from which a woman jumped to her death. The victim, Paula Wagner, had been living there with Smallwood's boyfriend. In her murder trial, the prosecution contended that Smallwood, then a student at Dickinson College, was jealous of Wagner, had threatened her, and had been spotted near the fire scene. A fire investigator found two points of origin - an indication that the blaze had been set. However, Gerald Hurst, a retired chemist in Texas who recently reviewed the case, said he believed that the investigator's conclusion about points of origin was incorrect and that the fire might have been accidental.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | By George L. Claflen Jr
The latest plan for Independence Mall and its generally positive reception bring forth the question: What actually is at stake here? Quite a lot. As architect Laurie Olin put it, Independence Hall's physical setting represents the origin myth of our country. Debate has raged in architectural circles for years between two contradictory physical representations of our national birth. The first deploys all the monumental tricks of composition to create a grandiose linear and axial composition, with the tower of Independence Hall at its head.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A dramatic early-morning fire that lit up the sky over the Blue Route at Plush Mill Road, destroying a surgeon's $400,000 Tudor-style house Jan. 19, has been declared arson. Township Police Chief Francis J. Corbett said yesterday that local and state police investigators found two points of origin of the fire: on the first floor and in the basement, both in the west end of the house. "We don't know yet who set the fire or what accelerant was used, but we're certain it was arson," Corbett said.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | GEORGE REYNOLDS/DAILY NEWS
Firefighters direct water into a window of an abandoned tannery yesterday, as a six-alarm blaze destroyed the building at American and George streets in Northern Liberties. Fire Commissioner Roger Ulshafer said the blaze's origin was suspicious.
NEWS
November 25, 1986
In Darrell Sifford's column of Nov. 13 "Attacking the roots of mental illness," George W. Albee asserts that he is battling the notion "that all mental illness is biological in origin. " Few, if any, psychiatrists have this notion. Only recently, because of overwhelming evidence, has the medical establishment even begun to acknowledge that schizophrenia and some forms of depression are biological in origin. Mr. Albee said, "Schizophrenia is 11 times more common among people at the poverty level, and this surely indicates that something far more than biology is at work.
LIVING
February 17, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At least once in the history of the universe, the inanimate materials of a newborn and sterile planet - hydrogen, ammonia and methane - gathered themselves into organisms. And life on Earth began. Scientists don't see any miracle in this creation. Life came about from a series of chemical reactions, says Jeffrey Bada, a chemist from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, Calif. To demonstrate how the spark of life might have taken hold on Earth, he and his colleagues are trying to coax it to happen again - in their laboratory flasks.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | For The Inquirer / JAY GORODETZER
Sixty-nine first graders at St. Laurence School participated in a pre- Halloween event yesterday by dressing up as their patron saints. This is the fifth year the school has held an All Saints' Day celebration. The event recognizes the origin of Halloween as a Christian celebration of the life of the saints held the evening before All Saints' Day. Besides dressing as the saint who shares his or her name, each student learned the story of the saint's life.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | By Adam L. Cataldo INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two children were killed yesterday morning in a fire in their home. Half-brothers Kenneth Jones, 2, and Joseph Alcorn, 10 months, were sleeping in the basement of their family's home at 300 D St. when the fire started about 1:10 a.m. "The fire started in the southwest corner of the basement, where the children were found," said Dave Schoch, an investigator with the Millville Fire Department. Schoch said investigators would not be able to determine the cause of the fire because of the extent of the damage.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 17, 2016 | By Max Rettig, STAFF WRITER
THE DRAFT is a relatively recent addition to most major sports, allowing teams to choose from the best up-and-coming players in the hopes that the worst teams will have the greatest chance to improve. These are the histories and experiences of the four major professional leagues: NFL Football's draft dates to 1936, after then-Eagles owner Bert Bell argued within the sport for an alternative to the waiver system created in 1934. Bell contended that the league needed a way to ensure competitive balance - that the worst team in the league would have the best chance to improve by selecting the best available college talent.
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Movie Critic
There's a scene in a film class in Scream 2 where the college kids (Sarah Michelle Gellar, Joshua Jackson, practically AARP members now!) start arguing over sequels. As in, name one that's better than the original. Aliens, T-2 , just about every title gets shot down. Finally, a student says he's got one: The Godfather: Part II. Well, add Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising to that rarefied list. Taking off from the 2014 goofball original - about a couple terrorized by the frat brothers next door - Neighbors 2 brings back most of the principals from the first movie, and then amps up the conflict by introducing a renegade band of college sisters.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
As Deadpool looks to break the box-office and comic-book superhero mold for movies this weekend, Fabian Nicieza, who cocreated the groundbreaking character in comics with artist Rob Liefeld exactly 25 years ago, in February 1991, says he couldn't be happier. "I generated the civilian identity [of Wade Wilson], his personality, the tragic aspect of seeking a cure for cancer leading to a cure that cost him his sanity, and his ability to function in society in any kind of a normal way," Nicieza said.
NEWS
November 14, 2015 | By Patrick Rapa, For The Inquirer
When your discography's only one record deep, it helps to know a few covers. Soulful Richmond, Va., singer-songwriter Natalie Prass, who has been on tour more or less since January, has fanned the flames ignited by her generally beloved self-titled debut with a eclectic array of extraordinary renditions. Highlights from the year so far: She did Slayer's "Raining Blood" for the A.V. Club, dueted with Ryan Adams on Patrick Swayze's "She's Like the Wind" in concert, and took on Janet Jackson's "Any Time, Any Place" for a b-side.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
An investment fund operated by New York's Square Mile Capital Management has originated a $26.8 million mortgage loan for the Penrose Plaza shopping center in Southwest Philadelphia, the company said in a release on Tuesday. Square Mile Capital Partners is funding the center's recent acquisition and planned capital expenditures by a joint venture of Onyx Properties, Abrams Realty & Development, and Siguler Guff. The 261,000-square-foot property at 2900-3000 Island Ave. is anchored by a ShopRite supermarket.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2015 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer
All roads lead back to Philadelphia. You always suspected. This week comes further proof. Alice's Adventures Under Ground , the original version of the children's classic that, 150 years ago, was published as Alice in Wonderland , returns to its onetime home, at 20th Street and Delancey Place, for four days, tomorrow through this weekend. The Rosenbach's exhibit about the book, featuring its local connection, lasts until May 15. Wait. You didn't know Alice lived in Philly?
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you don't find the idea of fondling sweaters hilarious, this is most likely not the TV review for you. On Friday, Netflix will release eight episodes of Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp , a prequel to the 2001 cult hit Wet Hot American Summer that starred Paul Rudd, Amy Poehler, Bradley Cooper, Elizabeth Banks, and Janeane Garofalo, among so many others, all of whom have returned to play younger versions of themselves....
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A fire that raced through a building under renovation in the 2000 block of South Juniper Street early Sunday morning has been ruled suspicious by fire officials. It took nearly three hours for firefighters to quell the blaze that also damaged four nearby rowhouses on Snyder Avenue. The fire apparently started after a witness said he saw two males in and around the building and then heard an explosion. The fire, which started about 3 a.m. near the intersection of Juniper and Snyder, caused heavy smoke and power outages, police said.
REAL_ESTATE
June 21, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
A stately house of worship, designed in the Gothic style by famed architect Frank Rushmore Watson and built in 1888, was saved by real estate developer Jordan Brody in 2012, just as the wrecking ball was heading for the former Episcopal Church of the Covenant on Girard Avenue in Brewerytown. The stars further aligned for the sandstone neighborhood landmark after Brody bought the building and hired Philadelphia architect Ian Smith. Smith designed a second life for the edifice that includes 16 apartments for rent, some of which are on two floors, with sleeping quarters in the former church loft.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2015 | By Mark Rienstra, For The Inquirer
Who would have thought that I had Napoleon to thank for my family name? I certainly didn't when we started our trek through Friesland as part of our son Joel's graduation trip. I knew that my ancestors emigrated from this mostly rural province of Holland in the late 1800s, but I did not know many other details of the family history. Nor did I know of a connection to the diminutive French general. But that is only one interesting tidbit we discovered as we pursued our roots. Renting a car in Amsterdam, we drove through the low-lying farmland near the Ijsselmeer, the large inland lake reclaimed from the North Sea. Passing by windmills (the modern electricity-generating kind)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|