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Orion

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1993 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Orion String Quartet is a group still coming into focus, at least if its concert Friday night at the Port of History Museum is any indication. The quartet's problems stem not from the challenge of melding four sounds into a unified voice, but mainly from the quality of one of those voices. The saboteur was violinist Daniel Phillips who, twice in the role of first violinist, was simply unable to play in tune. His wobbly pitch threw the other players off. Which is a shame, since as a group they came pretty close to mustering an emotionally convincing performance of Beethoven's String Quartet in A minor (Op. 132)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
This weekend at Bader Field in Atlantic City, heavy-hitting metal band Metallica headlines the inaugural Orion + More Festival, a two-day event featuring 40 acts. The thunderous San Francisco Bay-area quartet of front man James Hetfield, guitarist Kirk Hammett, bass player Robert Trujillo, and drummer Lars Ulrich will perform their album Ride the Lightning (1984) on Saturday and Metallica (1991), also known as the Black Album, on Sunday. Orion's lineup ranges from metal must-sees like Sepultura to indie band Best Coast to country tough guy Eric Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
The fact that Christmas is around the corner and many people are headed for a long weekend hasn't been lost on the video industry. So if things get dull around your house once all the presents have been opened, check out the avalanche of new titles at your video store this week. Among them: a surreal Spanish comedy, a wacky fantasy, a rockin' biography and a love story with a difference. WOMEN ON THE VERGE OF A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN (1989) (Orion) $79.98. 88 minutes. Carmen Maura, Fernando Guillen, Julieta Serrano, Maria Barranco.
NEWS
February 21, 2004
An editorial Wednesday on the discovery of a diamond-cored dwarf star provided the wrong translation of the name Regel or Rigel, a star in the constellation Orion. The name is Hebrew for "leg" (Orion's left leg).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Rain Man is the big video news this week, but also quietly arriving at your video store is a trio of well-loved foreign films. RAIN MAN (1989) (MGM/UA) $89.95. 134 minutes. Dustin Hoffman, Tom Cruise, Valeria Golino. Everything about the acting and direction of Barry Levinson's film is so exquisitely calibrated and so right that it's easy to forget how much could have gone wrong. The story of two brothers - a hustler and his autistic sibling - would have crested on a wave of unearned tears in lesser hands.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALLY, Pa. - The path to Mars goes through this small Berks County town that has long been a hub for textile manufacturing in the region stretching from Allentown to Reading. So said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a visit Friday to Bally Ribbon Mills, a family-owned business founded in 1923 to weave hat bands out of silk. Bally Ribbon, with the fourth generation in the business, still has shuttle-loom frames from that era. Those looms now make ribbons for military medals.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1988 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Among this week's new arrivals at the video store: a thoroughly winning and inspirational film about an inner-city teacher, and a less-than-perfect remake of a French comedy. STAND AND DELIVER (1988) (Warner) $89.95. 103 minutes. Edward James Olmos, Lou Diamond Phillips, Rosana De Soto, Andy Garcia. This movie has more than a few wonders to offer. Among them: a math test that has more genuine suspense than a half-dozen supposedly rousing bouts in the Rocky films, and an effortless, commanding, intricate, finely tuned marvel of a performance by Olmos as an inner-city teacher who works miracles in his East L.A. classroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, by Christopher Cornell
What do the 1919 White Sox, a pair of mismatched brothers and an aging shoeshine man have in common? They're all subjects of winning films that arrive in video stores this week. EIGHT MEN OUT (1988) (Orion) $89.98. 120 minutes. Charlie Sheen, John Cusack, D.B. Sweeney, Christopher Lloyd. In the most notorious World Series in history, the 1919 Chicago White Sox, one of the all-time great baseball teams, began playing like the 1988 Phillies. The scandal that banned eight players from the game for life becomes an inspired and brilliant essay from John Sayles on our craving for heroes and our delight in dethroning them.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
THE PARENTS: Natalie Levin, 45, and Cheryl Sterner, 34, of Glenside THE CHILD: Orion, born October 23, 2015 HOW THEY NAMED THE BABY: At a solstice party several years ago, the host's son was named Orion. Natalie, an astrology aficionado, thought it was "mystical without being ridiculous. " They figured Poppy Seed would be a girl. They were a household of females, after all: the two of them, plus Lily Beagle, and the five rescue cats. So why wouldn't their baby - the size of a poppy seed at conception, according to the fertility specialist - join the estrogen fest?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1988 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Your video store has three suggestions this week to brighten your new year: a thriller from George Romero, an East-West actioner and a sexy drama that combines love and politics. MONKEY SHINES (1988) (Orion) $89.98. 113 minutes. Jason Beghe, John Pankow, Joyce Van Patten. Risky and triumphant experiment in psychological terror directed by George (Night of the Living Dead) Romero. About the eerie interdependence of an accident victim and a capuchin monkey, the quadriplegic's equivalent of a guide dog. In this movie that gives a new twist to the expression "monkey on my back," the primate is not only the helping arms and legs of her master, but starts acting out the quadriplegic's frustrated rage.
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NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
THE PARENTS: Natalie Levin, 45, and Cheryl Sterner, 34, of Glenside THE CHILD: Orion, born October 23, 2015 HOW THEY NAMED THE BABY: At a solstice party several years ago, the host's son was named Orion. Natalie, an astrology aficionado, thought it was "mystical without being ridiculous. " They figured Poppy Seed would be a girl. They were a household of females, after all: the two of them, plus Lily Beagle, and the five rescue cats. So why wouldn't their baby - the size of a poppy seed at conception, according to the fertility specialist - join the estrogen fest?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Individual charisma can be regarded suspiciously in chamber music, because the medium is so much about cooperation. Thus, the Orion Quartet concert Sunday with Philadelphia Orchestra oboist Richard Woodhams packed the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater with promises that the excitement would arise from integrity rather than superficialities. The program was as serious as they get: Leon Kirchner's String Quartet No. 1 and Beethoven's mighty String Quartet in E-flat Op. 127 . The one lighter spot positively glimmered: Mozart's Oboe Quartet K 370 , not the composer's most significant piece of chamber music, but who cares?
BUSINESS
January 11, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALLY, Pa. - The path to Mars goes through this small Berks County town that has long been a hub for textile manufacturing in the region stretching from Allentown to Reading. So said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a visit Friday to Bally Ribbon Mills, a family-owned business founded in 1923 to weave hat bands out of silk. Bally Ribbon, with the fourth generation in the business, still has shuttle-loom frames from that era. Those looms now make ribbons for military medals.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
They say clothes make the man. This seems literally to have been true in the case of Jack, the central character in The Toughest Boy in Philadelphia , based on the true story of the 1920s gangster "Whistling Jack" McConnell, who was actually a transvestite named Florence Gray. Iron Age Theatre of Norristown brings this new play to Philadelphia for Gay Pride Month and for the company's first full run in the city in 10 years. Andrea Kennedy Hart's tedious script emphasizes the wrong stuff - long, pompous suffragette speeches and long, pompous psychoanalytic theory about curing "sexual inversion," plus the repeated telling of the myth of Orion, the relevance of which eluded me. We see very little of Jack's rise to fame and power, or of the way it would have gratified a woman in those powerless early years of the 20th century in our hometown.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
This weekend at Bader Field in Atlantic City, heavy-hitting metal band Metallica headlines the inaugural Orion + More Festival, a two-day event featuring 40 acts. The thunderous San Francisco Bay-area quartet of front man James Hetfield, guitarist Kirk Hammett, bass player Robert Trujillo, and drummer Lars Ulrich will perform their album Ride the Lightning (1984) on Saturday and Metallica (1991), also known as the Black Album, on Sunday. Orion's lineup ranges from metal must-sees like Sepultura to indie band Best Coast to country tough guy Eric Church.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Mark K. Matthews, Orlando Sentinel
WASHINGTON - There's no firm date yet, but sometime in early 2014, NASA intends to take its first major step toward rebuilding its human spaceflight program. The milestone is the maiden test flight of its Orion spacecraft, a launch that has come into sharper relief in the three months since NASA and manufacturer Lockheed Martin announced it. As planned, an unmanned Orion capsule will begin its journey at Cape Canaveral and take two loops around Earth before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Of all the paradoxes: Conductor Yannick N?zet-S?guin became the hero of his own concert by ceding the spotlight to all around him, making them look terrific - or better than they normally might. In this 34-year-old French Canadian conductor's reengagement Thursday with the Philadelphia Orchestra (as the music-director search goes into high gear), nothing was safe or certain, from his slightly strange concert attire (a long dark tie) to the ultra-slow tempos he allowed pianist Nicholas Angelich to take in Brahms' Piano Concerto No. 1. In a way, N?zet-S?guin showed what life would be like in a typical week with the conductor serving multiple agendas: the soloist's repertoire and established interpretation, plus the cause of modern music, in this case the 1980 Orion by the late Claude Vivier.
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When the members of the Orion Quartet told Tuesday's audience that they think of Lowell Liebermann's String Quartet No. 4 as a piece of American Shostakovich, I thought they might be kidding. But they weren't. And while you couldn't say Liebermann cribbed anything note for note from Shostakovich, we'd recognize that bleakness a mile away. An homage? Maybe. It was all very skillfully done, and even taking into account possible copyright infringement (yes, that's a joke) there's a lot to love about the piece.
NEWS
February 21, 2004
An editorial Wednesday on the discovery of a diamond-cored dwarf star provided the wrong translation of the name Regel or Rigel, a star in the constellation Orion. The name is Hebrew for "leg" (Orion's left leg).
NEWS
May 2, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Nothing in classical music has experienced such an expanded sound envelope over the last 20 years as the string quartet. But far from the modern string quartet's forays into world music and high technology, the Orion String Quartet's concert Wednesday at the Convention Center showed how composers strained mightily at traditional boundaries long before our time - and in the case of Beethoven, blew them to pieces. Easily, this was one of the most heavyweight chamber music concerts of the season.
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