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Orphanage

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NEWS
November 5, 1986 | Inquirer photos by Vicki Valerio
Life for the Dominican orphans includes some play, some work and, thanks to the South Jersey Rotary Clubs, a helping hand from caring doctors and friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A doom-laden Spanish thriller about the ghostly goings-on of castoff children, The Orphanage isn't as scary as Guillermo Del Toro's similarly themed The Devil's Backbone. But Del Toro has lent his name to The Orphanage anyway, "presenting" it in the manner of Martin Scorsese or Steven Spielberg, in hopes that the Pan's Labyrinth maestro's name will lure the crowds. Directed by Juan Antonio Bayona, The Orphanage stars Belen Rueda (from The Sea Inside) as Laura and Fernando Cayo as Carlos, a young, handsome wife and husband who have purchased a long-shuttered orphanage to turn into a home for disabled kids.
NEWS
February 16, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Susan Harvey Rhoades, 63, of Malvern, a real estate agent and airline sales representative, who helped establish an orphanage in Brazil, died Feb. 1 of a sudden heart attack at Montgomery Hospital, Norristown. For 25 years Mrs. Rhoades was a local sales representative for the Brazilian airline Varig. She traveled extensively on business in Brazil, always leaving home with big suitcases full of clothes for the street children who called her tia, or aunt. She found a U.S. sponsor for a boy who sold flowers and lived in a telephone booth, her family said, and in 1989 she cofounded an orphanage for special-needs children in Brazil, which operated for 10 years.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
There appear to be only two kinds of people in America: Those enlightened beings who love little children and know what is best for them, and the rest of us. The rest of us have narrow brows and beady eyes and are cruel and selfish and would tear children from their mothers' arms. Our despicable attitude was brought to my attention after I made the mistake of writing that privately operated children's homes, centers, orphanages - whatever they might be called - might not be such a bad idea.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kenneth Lee John Hawkins, 36, grew up in an orphanage and hit the streets at 16 with only the clothes he was wearing. His father was a thief, more adept at breaking out of prison than raising children, and his mother simply abandoned him. But Mr. Hawkins, who often recounted those stories of his upbringing, was an engaging, high-energy achiever who not only survived his desperate childhood, but excelled. He earned two college degrees, and four years ago became a vice president at the Better Business Bureau of Eastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Since 1999, each student at Abington High School has been required to perform some sort of community service in order to graduate. Tutoring is popular, as is volunteering in hospitals. Some of the girls this year are cutting off their hair so cancer patients can wear nicer wigs. Each student must sign up for 50 hours of service to satisfy the school. For Vika Guendelsberger, that's presented a bit of a problem. Just what work should she count? Twice a week, she volunteers at Holy Redeemer Hospital, helping out in the maternity ward's reception area, delivering papers and mail to elderly patients.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Orphanage. It's a word that can create a mental image of sad-eyed children in drab clothes shuffling into a gloomy dining hall to eat cold mush on tin plates. Or coughing and weeping as they huddle under tattered blankets in their dark, drafty dormitory. The adult keepers would be grim, penny-pinching tyrants with thin lips and quivering nostrils who take sadistic pleasure in tormenting the waifs. I've never been in an orphanage, so my vision is based on old British movies about orphanages as they may have existed when Charles Dickens was writing about them.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | By Jean Macfarlane, FOR THE INQUIRER
For most Indians, Diwali is a time for celebration. On the Hindu holiday in late October, candles are lit, fireworks are sent skyward, and gifts are exchanged. But a less-than-festive drama played out last month on a darkened street in the old part of this capital city. A baby girl, malnourished, wrapped in rags, and no more than a few hours old, was abandoned outside the Palna orphanage. Palna is the Hindi word for both "cradle" and "nurturing. " The orphanage is so called because it has an empty cradle outside its door 24 hours a day - an open invitation to the city's poorest and most desperate women to leave babies they do not want or feel unable to raise.
NEWS
March 1, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Born in Russia with cerebral palsy in 1990, Vanya Pashtukhov was abandoned by his alcoholic mother at a bleak Moscow orphanage called Baby House 10. For the next half-dozen years, he was clothed in rags and confined to a metal crib in near-constant "bed regime. " Government doctors labeled him "ineducable" and, when he was only 6, shunted him to an adult asylum for "mental defectives. " "It was terrifying," he recalled recently. "Like a devil's den. " Pashtukhov's pitiful childhood was no singular nightmare.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The teachers and administrators at Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School for Girls always knew the 72-year-old building used to be an orphanage, but the details of daily life faded fast as its former residents aged. It was only after a fire in the summer of 1998 damaged a row of closets in the basement that the employees realized what was originally down there. The present-day music-room annex was originally a stage, and the old, unused locker room was an auditorium with enough space to seat all 500 children.
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NEWS
June 16, 2013
Stephen Berg is a stay-at-home father and blogger It was pure serendipity that we adopted our son from Cambodia. While working in human resources at Marshall Field & Co., I befriended an 80-year-old children's department employee named Annie Carr. Though deeply religious - a dyed-in-the-wool Catholic - Annie wanted nothing more than to see us boys have a baby. Scott and I were exploring an adoption from China. One afternoon I returned from lunch to a frantic and breathless voice mail from Annie: "Steve, I've found a baby for you and Scott.
TRAVEL
May 27, 2013 | By Cheryl Rice, For The Inquirer
In March, my 16-year-old stepdaughter, Barclay, and I spent a week volunteering at an orphanage in Costa Rica. The trip had been in the works for a year and was prompted by my desire to share an out-of-our-comfort-zone adventure before Barclay's free time was monopolized by college visits, boyfriends, and driving lessons. As the trip neared, my anxiety mounted. Despite enduring four vaccinations before leaving, I realized there was no vaccine for jumping into the unknown. But as Frederick Wilcox said, "You can't steal second base and keep one foot on first.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis and Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writers
A teenager says his parents treated him badly, hassling him about little things until they finally kicked him out of the house, forcing him to sleep in a culvert. His parents describe a willful young man who ignored house rules, disrespected teachers and others, and chose to leave. It's a scenario that plays out in communities across the United States. In this instance, the troubles between a Collegeville couple - Jackie and Steve Salotti - and their son became an international incident when Russia framed it as an example of Americans mistreating adoptive Russian children.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Madeline Bialecki is a freelance writer in Eddystone
Several years ago, when I was working for a congregation of Catholic sisters, I visited their mission in Swaziland, a landlocked country in southern Africa. Swaziland is ruled by a king who has been known to make Parade Magazine's list of "world's worst dictators. " St. Philip's Mission is far removed from any city and most of the nearby homesteads have no running water or electricity. Rural Swaziland only began to get pit toilets in the 1990s. St. Philip's has a school, medical clinic, and orphanage that houses 127 children whose parents died from HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, or other diseases that are all too common in region.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Carley Petesch, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - Michaela DePrince was little more than a toddler when she saw her first ballerina - an image on a magazine page blown against the gate of the orphanage where she ended up during Sierra Leone's civil war. It showed an American ballet dancer posed on tip toe. "All I remember is she looked really, really happy," Michaela told the Associated Press last week. She wished "to become this exact person. " From the misery of the orphanage "I saw hope in it. And I ripped the page out and I stuck it in my underwear because I didn't have any place to put it. " Now Michaela is the one inspiring young Africans: She escaped war and is an African dancer in the world of ballet that sees few leading black females.
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Since 1999, each student at Abington High School has been required to perform some sort of community service in order to graduate. Tutoring is popular, as is volunteering in hospitals. Some of the girls this year are cutting off their hair so cancer patients can wear nicer wigs. Each student must sign up for 50 hours of service to satisfy the school. For Vika Guendelsberger, that's presented a bit of a problem. Just what work should she count? Twice a week, she volunteers at Holy Redeemer Hospital, helping out in the maternity ward's reception area, delivering papers and mail to elderly patients.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011 | By Joe Neumaier, New York Daily News
Any film as politically specific as Miral needs to be addressed on two levels, as a movie and as, from a certain viewpoint, a polemic. If a viewer can separate one from the other - and some may not - there's an intense, novelistic drama here. In 1948 Palestine, following the implementing of the United Nations' two-state solution, social worker Hind Husseini (Hiam Abbass) takes in 55 Palestinian orphans displaced by military action. Almost by accident, she starts a girls' orphanage and school.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
During the 17th and 18th centuries, Philadelphia cared for poor and orphaned children under a system rooted in the English Poor Law, in which children were usually indentured at a young age and often housed with the adult poor at a city almshouse. That began to change in 1814, when a group of Philadelphia women met in a schoolroom of the Second Presbyterian Church and founded one of the city's first orphanages. In March 1815, the Orphan Society of Philadelphia started caring for 25 children at a rented house on Market Street.
SPORTS
June 21, 2010
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - On Saturday, two members of England's national team, Michael Dawson and Matthew Upson, visited the SOS Children's Village, an orphanage housing approximately 80 children. The orphanage is situated outside Rustenburg, near England's World Cup base camp. Local radio stations and various websites circulated this (fabricated) quotation from the visit: "It's good to put a smile on the faces of people with no hope, constantly struggling and facing the impossible," said Jamal Umbobo, age 6, of his visit with Dawson and Upson.
NEWS
March 1, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Born in Russia with cerebral palsy in 1990, Vanya Pashtukhov was abandoned by his alcoholic mother at a bleak Moscow orphanage called Baby House 10. For the next half-dozen years, he was clothed in rags and confined to a metal crib in near-constant "bed regime. " Government doctors labeled him "ineducable" and, when he was only 6, shunted him to an adult asylum for "mental defectives. " "It was terrifying," he recalled recently. "Like a devil's den. " Pashtukhov's pitiful childhood was no singular nightmare.
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