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Orphans

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NEWS
November 2, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Bill Woodman came to town to stage Orphans for the Philadelphia Theater Company. Three days into rehearsal, a car knocked him down and broke his knee. An operation followed. When I inquired about his recovery, he sent along a nice note, saying he was ready to report on his summer in Yugoslavia directing "the Macedonian premiere of Sam Shepard's Buried Child. " Sam Shepard? Macedonia? Now that's what you call a story. In a flash, I was at Woodman's bedside at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, notebook in hand.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Santa Claus was there and so was an elf, but the gifts given yesterday didn't come from the North Pole. They were the citzenship papers given to the 20 or so foreign-born orphans who became American citzens during a ceremony at Philadelphia Distict Office of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service at 16th and Callowhill streets. J. Scott Blackman, the district director, called the children's ceremony a "holiday tradition. " The children came from as far as China, Russia, Holland, South America and Korea.
NEWS
September 28, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Marianne Massi and other members of Maranatha Tabernacle in Moorestown were determined that the Romanian orphans who were scheduled to visit would return home with happy memories. The orphans, who had been brought to the United States by Small World Ministries, were on their way to see the World Trade Center when the two towers were hit. Unable to leave New York, the group stayed overnight in a nearby hotel with no electricity and then headed to a Christian camp in South Carolina the next day. The group had originally planned to visit Moorestown before traveling to South Carolina.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Two extraordinary Brazilian features screen on Sunday, part of the ambitious "Latin American Visions" program at International House. Both are about orphans whose alienation from family alienates them from culture. Suzana Amaral's Hour of the Star (1986) is a lively chronicle of the extremely dull life of Macabea, a country orphan who comes to bustling Sao Paulo. A typist who can't spell, a romantic without a lover and a Coca-Cola aficionada who can't afford her taste, Macabea is a misfit everywhere but in her dreams.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Orphans - adapted by Alan J. Pakula but never adopted by movie-goers in its limited release last year - arrives here today as an orphan in its own right. Pakula's flawlessly judged and responsive version of Lyle Kessler's play opened to enthusiastic reviews in its Oscar-qualifying runs in New York and Los Angeles last fall. But for all its merits - chiefly a performance of Olympian skill from Albert Finney - the film failed to attract paying customers. It has been all but abandoned by its parent studio, Lorimar, and can be found on the doorstep of the Roxy Screening Room.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In a note to audiences, the New City Stage, which is literally new in the city, says it aims to present "actors striving to genuinely live on the stage within the imaginary world of the play. " In its production of Orphans the company does a pretty good job of achieving that goal. The play by Lyle Kessler is presented with an intensity that commands attention by dint of some strong performances, and because of the close proximity of the action to the audience in the makeshift theater space New City Stage has rented in the desolate NewMarket shopping center.
NEWS
November 16, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The situation is this: Two brothers grow up wild in an unkempt house without parents in the vicinity of Broad and Olney. The older brother, Treat, carries a knife. He mugs people. The younger brother, Phillip, spends days hiding in the closet, watching reruns on TV and staring out the window. He appears to be feeble-minded. Into their lives comes a hearty drunk from Chicago named Harold. His attache case is filled with a fortune in securities. Treat takes him captive, envisioning a windfall in ransom.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sister M. Alphonsa Molot, 89, who was imprisoned by the Russians in World War II and eventually helped bring a thousand Polish orphans to the United States, died Sunday at St. Joseph's Catholic Nursing Home, Woodbridge, Middlesex County. Born in Poland, Sister M. Alphonsa arrived in the United States weighing only 75 pounds following her wartime ordeals. She spent time recuperating before serving at the residence of the late Bishop Bartholomew Eustace in the Diocese of Camden. After obtaining her New Jersey practical nurse's license, she was assigned to St. Mary's Catholic Home in Cherry Hill for three years.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Heaven on Earth, the new single-episode edition of Masterpiece Theater airing tomorrow (Channel 12 at 9 p.m.), dramatizes one result of Britain's Industrial Revolution at the end of the 19th century: an unusually large number of orphans. These were children whose parents neglected them while they worked in the booming factories, or who were the survivors of parents who died from the frequent industrial accidents. Many of these luckless young people were sent to Canada and placed in foster homes - more than 125,000 of them between 1865 and 1914, in fact, under a program organized by a British feminist, Susan Rye. All of this is explained by Masterpiece host Alastair Cooke before the start of this 90-minute, Canadian-made production, and it's a good thing, too, because Heaven on Earth itself provides little historical context.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No art project has ever mattered as much to Abington High School junior Lizzie Kreitschmann, and not just because she's shooting for an A. Instead of eating lunch most days, Kreitschmann works on her drawing of a 15-year-old Egyptian orphan with lopsided eyes, a tight-lipped smile and blue shirt. It may be the first portrait of himself that the boy has ever had. It will surely become a prized possession - if only Kreitschmann captures his likeness, something she can't help worrying about.
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NEWS
May 8, 2015
"ORPHAN" is a very empty word, starting with the initial "O" that reminds me of a big, alphabetic hole. It conjures up images of loss, of being rootless, of unwanted and untenable liberty. When I think of "orphan," I think of something flying around in the great human universe, searching for its home. Today, I'm an orphan. That sounds silly, given the fact that I've been able to vote for more than 35 years, which means I'm a very big girl. I pay taxes, own (33 1/3 percent of) a house, take the El by myself and even know how to defrost things.
NEWS
April 20, 2015
*  GAME OF THRONES . 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. Where's Arya? The younger of the two Stark daughters (Maisie Williams) wasn't in last week's Season 5 premiere, but she's far from forgotten. This weekend, she finally gets off the boat she boarded in last year's finale. *  ORPHAN BLACK . 9 p.m. Saturday, BBC America. The storytelling's twistier than ever, and as Season 3 opens Tatiana Maslany continues to dazzle in multiple roles. I might be willing to watch an entire show about her soccer mom clone, Alison (below right, with Kristian Bruun)
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if you discovered that you were the property of a multinational corporation? That it held exclusive rights to the very essense of your being - your unique genetic code? What if you found out, you weren't born but man-made? That you are one of nine identical people constructed in a lab? That's one of the terrifying truths Sarah Manning (Tatiana Maslany) has to face in BBC America's Orphan Black , a superb, exciting and intelligent sci-fi thriller which returns for its third season 9 p.m. Saturday.
FOOD
April 10, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2008, the economic crisis that crashed down on Wall Street and rippled around the globe eventually washed over the impoverished Kisii region of Kenya, where Sara Holby, then 21, was volunteering for a nonprofit that provided food and medicine to HIV/AIDS patients. It swept away the organization's funding almost overnight. "When people came to the office looking for help every day, we basically had nothing to offer them," recalled Holby, who is from Upper Black Eddy, Bucks County.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest twist in the debate over the future of Girard College, the Board of Directors of City Trusts said Thursday that it would appeal an Orphans' Court decision barring the school from suspending its high school and boarding programs to save money. At the same time, the board pledged to operate the secondary program for four more years to ensure current eighth graders can graduate from the school in 2018-19. "Girard's financial challenges remain unresolved, and there is no doubt that they threaten the long-term survival of the school," board president Ronald R. Donatucci said in a statement.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The book chosen for the 2015 One Book, One Philadelphia program is the 2013 novel Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline. To be announced by the Free Library of Philadelphia and the Mayor's Office on Thursday morning, Orphan Train will be the focus of more than 100 art installations, films, performances, discussion groups, and other activities in schools throughout the city. The middle-grade book for 2015 is Rodzina by Karen Cushman, and the children's book is Locomotive by Brian Floca.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Girard College on Monday asked the city's Orphans' Court to reconsider its recent ruling that the school cannot suspend its high school and boarding programs to improve its finances. The move, one step short of an appeal, came three weeks after Orphans' Court Judge Joseph D. O'Keefe said the boarding and secondary programs were critical parts of the vision the merchant-banker Stephen Girard outlined in his 1831 bequest. The money he left created the free boarding school for poor orphans on a 43-acre site in Fairmount.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
What will happen once human cloning becomes scientifically feasible? That question is addressed with chilling logic in BBC America's superb sci-fi thriller Orphan Black , which returns for a second season Saturday at 9 p.m. And it ain't pretty. Tatiana Maslany plays multiple roles as clones - we've met seven so far - created by a powerful conglomerate named Dyad and its scary head scientist, Aldous Leekie (Matt Frewer). Set in Toronto, Orphan Black is told principally through the eyes of one of the clones, English-born grifter and single mother Sarah Manning.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* ORPHAN BLACK. 9 p.m. Saturday, BBC America. * DEVIOUS MAIDS. 10 p.m. Sunday, Lifetime. THINK HOW MUCH easier it would be for Hollywood if someone cloned Tatiana Maslany. BBC America's Peabody Award-winning "Orphan Black," which returns for a second season tomorrow, not only has more fully developed female characters than many TV dramas - it has Maslany playing most of them. Which is easy to forget when two or more of the clones are gathered, because whatever their identical natures, they are, as played by Maslany, entirely separate human beings.
NEWS
January 14, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
A QUIET RESIDENTIAL street in the affluent Main Line hamlet of Wayne was jolted yesterday afternoon by an apparent murder-suicide that orphaned three children. "At 2:20 p.m., we received a report of a shooting at 319 S. Wayne Ave., and later discovered that the person who made the call was actually the same person who committed the shooting," said Radnor Township Police Chief William Colarulo. "This was a couple in their 40s," Colarulo said. "The female was shot at least twice.
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