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Orthopedic Surgery

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NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Cassidy, 93, of Philadelphia, a former chief of orthopedic surgery at Northeastern Hospital, died Thursday, Feb. 20, of dementia at St. Joseph's Manor in Meadowbrook. A Philadelphia native, Dr. Cassidy graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1938 and from St. Joseph's College with a bachelor's degree in 1942. He completed his medical degree at Temple University Medical School in 1945. He was a physician in the Navy Medical Corps during World War II. On release from active duty, Dr. Cassidy set up a family practice in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | By Idris M. Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. Joyce, 76, of Glenside, a "workaholic" doctor who served as chief of orthopedic surgery at Germantown Hospital and Medical Center and helped teach his craft to doctors in underdeveloped countries, died at home Saturday of multiple myeloma, a form of bone-marrow cancer. Dr. Joyce had been retired from the practice of orthopedic surgery for four years. He also was a lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania. In his long career, Dr. Joyce helped promote the use of arthroscopy, a technique commonly used for microscopic surgery on joints.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Irvin Stein, 93, a retired Philadelphia orthopedic surgeon who once served as chief of orthopedic surgery at Philadelphia General Hospital, died of congestive heart failure on Feb. 3 at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. Relatives said his death followed heart surgery last year. Dr. Stein had lived in Boca Raton, Fla., since the mid-1980s, when he last lived in Philadelphia. Born in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1906, he entered college at age 15. He graduated from the University of North Carolina, received medical training at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, and intern and resident training at Johns Hopkins University Medical Center and the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 17, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edgar L. Ralston, 91, who headed the department of orthopedic surgery at the University of Pennsylvania for 17 years, died Monday of pulmonary failure at the Quadrangle, a retirement community in Haverford. Before moving to the Quadrangle, Dr. Ralston had been a longtime resident of Center City. During his tenure as department chief, from 1960 to 1977, Dr. Ralston established a research laboratory, expanded the residency program, and oversaw growth in the faculty and clinical program.
NEWS
May 9, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. James E. Nixon, 80, of West Philadelphia, who as a pioneer in arthroscopic surgery helped keep athletes on the field, dancers on their toes, and soldiers ready for duty, died of lung disease Monday at Pennsylvania Hospital. "Dr. Nixon was always 10 years ahead of other surgeons," said John Gregg, an orthopedic surgeon at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. "He was the first real sports-medicine specialist in the country. He bought the endoscope from a Japanese firm and pioneered arthroscopic surgery in the early '70s.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Trevor Johnson was 11, his growing spine took a detour from the normal straight path. Instead of stacking neatly one atop the other, his vertebrae began to drift sideways into an S-shape and his rib cage started torquing to the left. This spinal deformity, called idiopathic adolescent scoliosis, is common, affecting nearly 6 million Americans. In its early stages, the long-accepted approach is to wait and see whether the curve worsens. Trevor's parents had been down this road before and were not alarmed.
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hal E. Snedden, 78, of Penn Valley, an orthopedic surgeon who contributed to the professional status of Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation in Malvern, died of complications from a stroke Wednesday at Waverly Heights, a nursing and retirement center in Gladwyne. Dr. Snedden was chief of orthopedic surgery at Bryn Mawr Hospital from 1973 to 1983, and it was during that period that he helped transform Bryn Mawr Rehab from a tuberculosis hospital to a center treating orthopedic ailments. Dr. Snedden's choice of orthopedics as his profession could be traced to his stint in the Army during World War II, when he was assigned to work in physical therapy among wounded servicemen.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | By Loretta Tofani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Centers for Disease Control is funding a $300,000 investigation of whether the use of surgical drills and other power tools on bones of AIDS patients could cause invisible AIDS-infected particles to be released into operating rooms, infecting health workers, CDC officials said yesterday. The CDC previously has said that the AIDS virus - HIV - cannot be spread through air - for example, through sneezes and coughs. The virus, the CDC says, can be spread through blood, and some surgeons have questioned whether large quantities of blood sprayed into the air during orthopedic surgery can create aerosols - or invisible particles of blood in the air - containing the deadly AIDS virus.
SPORTS
November 21, 2002 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It could have been worse. Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb could easily have come out of Sunday's game against the Arizona Cardinals with a much more serious injury than the broken ankle he suffered on the team's third offensive play. "He was lucky," said John D. Kelly 4th, associate professor of orthopedic surgery and vice chairman of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Temple University Hospital. McNabb went on to play nearly the entire game with a non-displaced fracture of his right fibula.
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NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Trevor Johnson was 11, his growing spine took a detour from the normal straight path. Instead of stacking neatly one atop the other, his vertebrae began to drift sideways into an S-shape and his rib cage started torquing to the left. This spinal deformity, called idiopathic adolescent scoliosis, is common, affecting nearly 6 million Americans. In its early stages, the long-accepted approach is to wait and see whether the curve worsens. Trevor's parents had been down this road before and were not alarmed.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Cassidy, 93, of Philadelphia, a former chief of orthopedic surgery at Northeastern Hospital, died Thursday, Feb. 20, of dementia at St. Joseph's Manor in Meadowbrook. A Philadelphia native, Dr. Cassidy graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1938 and from St. Joseph's College with a bachelor's degree in 1942. He completed his medical degree at Temple University Medical School in 1945. He was a physician in the Navy Medical Corps during World War II. On release from active duty, Dr. Cassidy set up a family practice in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia.
SPORTS
April 2, 2013 | From Inquirer Wire Services
After Louisville guard Kevin Ware went down while trying to block a three-point shot by Duke's Tyler Thornton on Sunday, Cardinals guard Russ Smith said, the severity of Ware's leg injury was immediately clear. "When he landed, I heard it," Smith said at a news conference after Louisville's 85-63 win over the Blue Devils. "It was really hard for me to pull myself together. " The 6-foot-2 Ware's right leg bent in such an awkward and frightening angle that CBS stopped replays. "The bone was literally out. I saw white, it was literally out," said Chane Behanan, who collapsed at the sight.
NEWS
October 29, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Resnick, 86, of Bala Cynwyd, an orthopedic surgeon and former director of the Pain Control Center at Temple University, died of complications from heart disease Tuesday, Oct. 25, at Temple University Hospital. Dr. Resnick founded the center and operated it from 1975 to 1991, his son, Bernard, said. On summer visits sponsored by Care/Medico from 1973 to 1984 and Orthopedics Overseas from 1984 to 1990, Dr. Resnick taught physicians in Kenya and Tunisia as well as in Peru and the Dominican Republic.
SPORTS
October 3, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three hours before Sunday night's Game 2 of the Phillies-Cardinals NL division series, fans were already piled deep at the Citizens Bank Park entrances. The problem with getting there that early is that you can only spend so much time eating and watching BP. So here are a few suggestions about how those people might have passed the long pregame hours: Hang around outside and soothe the frayed psyches of lingering Eagles fans with a kind word, a beer, or a noose. Stop by the WPHT-AM (1210)
NEWS
April 4, 2011
Nicholas DiNubile ("Dr. Nick"), chief of orthopedic surgery at Delaware County Memorial Hospital specializing in sports medicine, coined "boomeritis" to describe the musculoskeletal weak links that can trouble us as we age. As warmer weather beckons us outdoors, he spoke to Inquirer columnist Art Carey about ways to become active and fit without damaging your body.   Question: What's the biggest mistake people make when they resume exercising after a winter layoff?
NEWS
February 26, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
F. William Bora Jr., 82, of Gladwyne, a hand surgeon and professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died at home Wednesday, Feb. 23, from complications of head trauma suffered in a fall last year. Dr. Bora was chief of hand surgery at Penn from 1977 to 1996 and remained on the faculty before retiring in 1998. From 1963 until last year, he was on the staff of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia. Dr. Bora joined the faculty at Penn in 1962 and established an orthopedic surgery practice in Yeadon.
NEWS
February 15, 2011 | By MARY MAZZONI, mazzonm@phillynews.com
A severely wounded pit bull puppy, believed to be a dogfighting survivor, is being nursed back to health, and animal rescuers hope to soon put it up for adoption. The black-and-white pup was found by Philadelphia Animal Care and Control officers Feb. 10, staggering on Merion Avenue near 45th Street in West Philadelphia, covered in bite marks and close to death. The dog, later named Kelly, is being cared for by Animal Alliance, an animal-rescue nonprofit agency in Lambertville, N.J. She is recuperating under the care of a foster family in Somerset County, N.J. Once healthy, Animal Alliance will put her up for adoption.
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