FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 25, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
In an effort to prevent workplace deaths, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration periodically mails employers a newsletter called "Fatal Facts. " Each newsletter describes an actual fatal accident and gives advice on how such accidents might be prevented. In most cases, that advice could be summed up as: Use some common sense, dummy! For example, a painting foreman who climbed over a bridge railing to inspect work being done, slipped and fell 150 feet to his death.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration said it cited Heraeus Materials Technology L.L.C. for exposing workers to dangerously high levels of lead and silver metal, among other violations, at the company's West Conshohocken facility. OSHA initiated an inspection in December 2011 after being alerted by the Pennsylvania Department of Health of a possible exposure. Proposed penalties total $45,265, OSHA said. Based in Hanau, Germany, Heraeus produces conductive pastes at the West Conshohocken facility containing precious and other metals that are used to make circuit boards.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1988 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration yesterday proposed fines of nearly $1.4 million against Campbell Soup Co.'s Pepperidge Farm unit for alleged violations at its Downingtown cookie and snack plant. The fines, among the highest ever proposed by OSHA, were for what the agency described as "willful violations" of safety and health standards and record-keeping requirements. Pepperidge Farm said it would contest the penalty, which it described as "arbitrarily assigned and totally unjustifiable.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Steven Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Members of the Senate Labor Committee lambasted the top officials of the federal government's health and safety program yesterday, contending that thousands of workers have been killed because the government failed to protect them. "We have seen a parade of horribles; we have seen the lives of working men and women cut short by bloodless bureaucrats," said committee Chairman Edward M. Kennedy (D., Mass.) at the end of hearings on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013
Following an October 2012 inspection, the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Becksted Masonry L.L.C., of Voorhees, for exposing workers to scaffolding hazards - including lack of fall protection and missing toe boards. The company had been cited for similar violations in 2008 and 2010 at work sites in Gibbsboro, Manalapan and Voorhees, the safety agency said Thursday. Besides being cited for three repeat violations, the company was cited for two serious violations, including lack of proper scaffolding training.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia contractors' "deliberate neglect" of basic demolition safety rules resulted in the Center City building collapse that killed six people in June, federal workplace regulators said Thursday. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced fines totaling $397,000 against the two companies. "Campbell Construction and S&R Contracting sacrificed worker and public safety through the deliberate neglect of demolition safety fundamentals. This tragic incident could and should have been prevented," said David Michaels, assistant U.S. secretary of labor for occupational safety and health.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Havertown building contractor cited after two workers were injured when they came in contact with power lines, has been cited again by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA said it had put DMAC Construction LLC, its owner, Darren McGee, and a previous company, McGee Plastering & Stucco Inc., on a list of "severe violators. " Companies under his control have been cited for more than 40 scaffolding violations since 2008, OSHA said.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
WARMINSTER Bucks County business owner William H. Marsh said he expected to pay a "substantial fine" after a federal regulator executed a warrant to inspect his steel-products manufacturing plant Monday. "This is a dangerous place to work," Marsh said of his Warminster company, American Bar Products Inc. He said his 11 employees work in a noisy, dusty, and greasy environment, adding, "I might get in trouble for saying that. " "If you want a totally safe plant, then you shut down that plant and you don't work," Marsh said.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2013
RPK Construction Inc. of Burlington has been cited by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration for three violations - including one for the willful failure to protect employees from falls while working above the ground. That violation carries a $15,400 penalty. "Falls are among the most common causes of work-related injuries and deaths," Paula Dixon-Roderick, director of OSHA's Marlton Area Office, said in a statement. "This company's failure to provide fall protection for workers reflects a negligent attitude toward worker safety and health.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 19, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Everywhere Nick DeJesse goes, he sees a problem. So a nice stroll in South Philadelphia en route to a cup of cappuccino Friday turns into an hour-long lecture on fall hazards, trench hazards, and silica dust exposure, with the examples framed by scaffolding on nearly every block. "Whose mother, whose father, whose grandmother, whose baby is breathing that dust?" asked DeJesse, the Philadelphia director of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, as he watched workers repairing bricks at a residential project near 25th and Christian Streets.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Two stucco companies hired to build 31 Brewerytown, described as "Philadelphia's Hottest Place to Live" by its developer, have been fined $236,000 for failing to protect construction workers from falling. Although Westrum Development Co., the general contractor of the apartment project on West Thompson Street, was not cited, the director of the U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration office in Philadelphia blamed Westrum for creating a situation that led to the citations.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration fined Cooper University Hospital $55,000 for allowing employees to be exposed to needle-stick injuries and bloodborne pathogen hazards, the agency said Thursday. OSHA also said the Camden hospital failed to train carpenter-shop employees on the hazards of methylene chloride, a cancer-causing chemical in an adhesive used to fasten laminate to countertops. Cooper also failed to monitor employees exposed to the chemical, according to OSHA.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Maybe high on the roof, so close to the sky, roofers such as James McCullagh feel invincible, towering over the world, towering over their fate. McCullagh, 60, said as much in federal court Tuesday, before he was sentenced to prison in connection with a roofing accident that killed his good friend Mark T. Smith, 52, on June 21, 2013. "It is a dangerous trade," McCullagh told U.S. District Judge Nitza I. Quinones Alejandro in a courtroom filled with about 50 spectators, the majority of them McCullagh's friends and many cousins.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Joshua Elbolde came to work as usual on July 11, 2014, signing in for his shift at Lloyd Industries, a Montgomeryville duct manufacturer. By the end of the day, Elbolde's fingers had been crushed in a press brake. He lost his fingers; three had to be amputated. And he lost his job; he was told not come back. The accident set in motion an OSHA investigation that led to $822,000 in fines and a federal lawsuit, filed against the company Tuesday. Lloyd makes ventilation and safety ducts used at Philadelphia International Airport and at stadiums where the New York Yankees and the Baltimore Ravens play, its website says.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued eight citations to High Quality Builders Inc., totaling $72,880 in penalties in connection with a July 6 incident where a 30-year-old construction worker fell 40 feet and became paralyzed from the waist down. The Bordentown company, OSHA said, routinely misused front-end loaders to support scaffolding platforms and failed to provide fall protection or training. The incident, which took place as the worker was installing gutters on new apartment and condominium buildings in West Chester, was the second fall incident in 2015 for that company, which had been cited by OSHA in March and June.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years ago, the first day of summer was the last day in the life of Mark T. Smith, 52, a construction worker who fell 45 feet to his death while repairing a roof at Old Zion Lutheran Church on North Broad Street. Wednesday marked the beginning of a new episode for Smith's boss, roofer James J. McCullagh, 60, of Meadowbrook, who pleaded guilty in federal court to six charges in connection with the fall that killed Smith. McCullagh faces up to 25 years in prison at sentencing March 29. "Obviously, he feels sorry about what happened to his friend," said McCullagh's lawyer, Michael McDermott.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
United Hospital Supply Corp., a family-run Burlington, N.J., company that makes and designs metal cabinets and furniture for laboratories and offices, faces a proposed fine of $181,500 for 21 worker health and safety violations - most of them serious and repeat violations - the U.S. Labor Department's Occupational and Safety and Health Administration said Monday. "The willful and repeat violations cited during these latest inspections were identified in 2010 at United Health Supply Corp.'s facility," Paula Dixon-Roderick, OSHA's area director in Marlton, said in a statement.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
EIGHTY AIRLINE workers in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., have asked the U.S. Justice Department to investigate American Airlines and US Airways, saying bosses routinely use racial slurs, deny minority workers perks and training, delay or botch maintenance and repairs, keep dangerously faulty equipment in use and retaliate against complainers. Attorney Brian Mildenberg filed safety complaints outlining the workers' claims in September with the Federal Aviation Administration and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner of an area roofing company was indicted on charges of lying to federal authorities investigating the death of an employee who fell 45 feet from roof scaffolding in Philadelphia on June 21, 2013. James J. McCullagh, 60, the owner of James J. McCullagh Roofing Inc., was accused of ordering two employees to tell federal investigators that they, and the man who died, had been given fall protection, including safety harnesses, when he knew they had not. The indictment was handed up Thursday by a federal grand jury in Philadelphia.
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