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BUSINESS
July 25, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
In an effort to prevent workplace deaths, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration periodically mails employers a newsletter called "Fatal Facts. " Each newsletter describes an actual fatal accident and gives advice on how such accidents might be prevented. In most cases, that advice could be summed up as: Use some common sense, dummy! For example, a painting foreman who climbed over a bridge railing to inspect work being done, slipped and fell 150 feet to his death.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration said it cited Heraeus Materials Technology L.L.C. for exposing workers to dangerously high levels of lead and silver metal, among other violations, at the company's West Conshohocken facility. OSHA initiated an inspection in December 2011 after being alerted by the Pennsylvania Department of Health of a possible exposure. Proposed penalties total $45,265, OSHA said. Based in Hanau, Germany, Heraeus produces conductive pastes at the West Conshohocken facility containing precious and other metals that are used to make circuit boards.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1988 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration yesterday proposed fines of nearly $1.4 million against Campbell Soup Co.'s Pepperidge Farm unit for alleged violations at its Downingtown cookie and snack plant. The fines, among the highest ever proposed by OSHA, were for what the agency described as "willful violations" of safety and health standards and record-keeping requirements. Pepperidge Farm said it would contest the penalty, which it described as "arbitrarily assigned and totally unjustifiable.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Steven Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Members of the Senate Labor Committee lambasted the top officials of the federal government's health and safety program yesterday, contending that thousands of workers have been killed because the government failed to protect them. "We have seen a parade of horribles; we have seen the lives of working men and women cut short by bloodless bureaucrats," said committee Chairman Edward M. Kennedy (D., Mass.) at the end of hearings on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia contractors' "deliberate neglect" of basic demolition safety rules resulted in the Center City building collapse that killed six people in June, federal workplace regulators said Thursday. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced fines totaling $397,000 against the two companies. "Campbell Construction and S&R Contracting sacrificed worker and public safety through the deliberate neglect of demolition safety fundamentals. This tragic incident could and should have been prevented," said David Michaels, assistant U.S. secretary of labor for occupational safety and health.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013
Following an October 2012 inspection, the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Becksted Masonry L.L.C., of Voorhees, for exposing workers to scaffolding hazards - including lack of fall protection and missing toe boards. The company had been cited for similar violations in 2008 and 2010 at work sites in Gibbsboro, Manalapan and Voorhees, the safety agency said Thursday. Besides being cited for three repeat violations, the company was cited for two serious violations, including lack of proper scaffolding training.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Havertown building contractor cited after two workers were injured when they came in contact with power lines, has been cited again by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA said it had put DMAC Construction LLC, its owner, Darren McGee, and a previous company, McGee Plastering & Stucco Inc., on a list of "severe violators. " Companies under his control have been cited for more than 40 scaffolding violations since 2008, OSHA said.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
WARMINSTER Bucks County business owner William H. Marsh said he expected to pay a "substantial fine" after a federal regulator executed a warrant to inspect his steel-products manufacturing plant Monday. "This is a dangerous place to work," Marsh said of his Warminster company, American Bar Products Inc. He said his 11 employees work in a noisy, dusty, and greasy environment, adding, "I might get in trouble for saying that. " "If you want a totally safe plant, then you shut down that plant and you don't work," Marsh said.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2013
RPK Construction Inc. of Burlington has been cited by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration for three violations - including one for the willful failure to protect employees from falls while working above the ground. That violation carries a $15,400 penalty. "Falls are among the most common causes of work-related injuries and deaths," Paula Dixon-Roderick, director of OSHA's Marlton Area Office, said in a statement. "This company's failure to provide fall protection for workers reflects a negligent attitude toward worker safety and health.
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NEWS
July 16, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
EIGHTY AIRLINE workers in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., have asked the U.S. Justice Department to investigate American Airlines and US Airways, saying bosses routinely use racial slurs, deny minority workers perks and training, delay or botch maintenance and repairs, keep dangerously faulty equipment in use and retaliate against complainers. Attorney Brian Mildenberg filed safety complaints outlining the workers' claims in September with the Federal Aviation Administration and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner of an area roofing company was indicted on charges of lying to federal authorities investigating the death of an employee who fell 45 feet from roof scaffolding in Philadelphia on June 21, 2013. James J. McCullagh, 60, the owner of James J. McCullagh Roofing Inc., was accused of ordering two employees to tell federal investigators that they, and the man who died, had been given fall protection, including safety harnesses, when he knew they had not. The indictment was handed up Thursday by a federal grand jury in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Havertown building contractor cited after two workers were injured when they came in contact with power lines, has been cited again by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA said it had put DMAC Construction LLC, its owner, Darren McGee, and a previous company, McGee Plastering & Stucco Inc., on a list of "severe violators. " Companies under his control have been cited for more than 40 scaffolding violations since 2008, OSHA said.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Better training might have prevented the deaths of four workers killed by lethal gas November 15 at DuPont's facility in LaPorte, Texas, the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Health and Safety Adminstration said Thursday. OSHA fined the company $99,000 for 10 violations, including one for insufficient training. The incident began when one worker opened a drain on a methyl mercaptan vent line and was overcome. Three people who tried to help also died. None had respirators.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County company that assembles surgical carts used in medical facilities faces more than $42,000 in fines for exposing workers to chemical hazards, the U.S. Labor Department said Tuesday. Following a complaint in September, the U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration found that Seitz Technical Products in Oxford did not properly label hazardous chemicals, provide eye wash stations, train employees in use of hazardous chemicals or maintain a library of chemical safety sheets.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Chris Palmer and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
At dusk Thursday, fire crews hauled spotlights toward the mangled remains of a collapsed steel silo at an industrial complex in Bristol Township. They had already searched the wreckage for nearly 14 hours, hoping for any sign of Anthony Gabriele, a plant worker they believed was trapped beneath mountains of cement when the 125-foot silo collapsed overnight. Given the scale of the debris and the temperatures, officials weren't optimistic about finding Gabriele alive. After a few hours, they stopped calling their effort a rescue attempt and started to call it a recovery.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Failure to protect seasonal workers, primarily teenagers, from summer heat hazards at Dorney Park and Wildwater Kingdom in Allentown led to a citation and a proposed $7,000 fine for the amusement parks' operator, Cedar Fair L.P. The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigated safety conditions at Dorney Park June 9, based on reports that a teenage worker suffered burns after collapsing near a kitchen fryer at...
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
JOSE DAVID ORTEGA of Camden liked to work with his hands. In July, Ortega and two other men, all three of them day laborers, were razing a defunct Blockbuster in Cherry Hill. A wall collapsed on Ortega, killing him, said his mom, Odily Castro. When she buried her son a week later, she said, the expense was shouldered entirely by the family. That's because Ortega, 40, a father of two, was an undocumented immigrant brought to the U.S. in the '80s by his mother, who was granted political asylum after fleeing the Contras in Nicaragua.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The job called for routine elevator maintenance at the New York Avenue Apartments, a 15-story building of elderly and disabled residents in Atlantic City. A crew arrived Friday morning: Brian Jacome, 25, and a co-worker, his brother, police said. Then, just after 10 a.m., something terrible happened. A 911 call came. Someone, dispatchers learned, had fallen down the elevator shaft. Police and paramedics rushed to the building, but it was already too late. Jacome was dead.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey called Friday for more scrutiny of temporary worker fatalities, citing a man's death at a Bucks County sugar plant last year. The Pennsylvania Democrat pressed the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration to investigate the prevalence of such deaths and offer guidance to lawmakers. Casey also pushed for the Protecting America's Workers Act, a perennial bill that would increase penalties for employers who fail to follow safety laws. Casey's call was described by an attorney for employers as "saber rattling" because OSHA efforts are underway.
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