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Oskar Schindler

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NEWS
May 13, 1994 | BY JACK McKINNEY
In the wake of the seven Oscars won by Steven Spielberg's film, most readers are at least roughly familiar with the story of "Schindler's List. " Much has been written about Oskar Schindler, the Sudeten-German who saved over a thousand Jews by listing them as skilled, essential workers in factories he operated in Nazi-occupied Poland. But what of Itzhak Stern, the quiet Jewish accountant who actually ran the business while Schindler wined and dined the Nazis to divert their attention from his rescue project?
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | By MURRAY PANTIRER
In the movie Schindler's List, there's a scene at the end where a group of men and women gather in Jerusalem at Oskar Schindler's grave. This group is composed of Schindlerjuden . . . Jews who lived through and survived the events described in Steven Spielberg's film. I am one of them. And to this day, I have no idea who put me on the list or how I survived. But I did survive. I did come to America. I did become a proud citizen of this, the greatest country in the world. But not a day goes by when I do not remember how I felt and what I witnessed so many years ago. That's why I am so deeply and gravely concerned.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Leon Leyson, 83, who was the youngest of 1,100 Jews saved from the Nazis by Oskar Schindler, died Saturday in Whittier, Calif., after a four-year battle with lymphoma, his daughter, Stacy Wilfong, told the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Leyson was nearly 10 when Germany invaded Poland in 1939. Six months later, his family was sent to a ghetto in Krakow. He survived as mass killings and deportations to concentration camps escalated. Mr. Leyson, who lost two brothers during the Holocaust, at 13 was the youngest of the Jewish workers Schindler, an industrialist, saved by declaring them necessary for production at his factories.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Argentine government restored a $900-a-month pension last week to the widow of the man featured in the film Schindler's List. A change of government in December disrupted the payment to Emilie Schindler, ordered last year by former President Carlos Menem. German industrialist Oskar Schindler is credited with saving nearly 1,300 Polish Jews from Nazi concentration camps by drawing up lists of fictitious jobs to convince the German authorities that the "workers" were essential to the war effort.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY MICHAEL O'SULLIVAN, Washington Post
THE DOCUMENTARY "No Place on Earth" doesn't seem as if it should work quite as well as it does. A History Channel production, the tale of Ukrainian Jews who survived in underground caves for 511 days while hiding from the Nazis during World War II is structured around lengthy, foreign-language re-enactments of the events featuring costumed performers. Why not just commit to the undeniably thrilling theatricality of the story and make a fictionalized dramatic feature? Instead, Emmy-winning documentarian Janet Tobias ("Life 360")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Schindler's List, children - Steven Spielberg's long-favored vehicles for expressions of hope and sunny confidence about humanity's future - rush toward an ominous line of waiting trucks. In their exuberant innocence, the youngsters wave a farewell whose finality they cannot know as their parents stand helpless, paralyzed by the horror of what awaits their offspring. Like many scenes in Schindler's List, this parting becomes more than an indelible, wrenching moment of shared pain.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Steven Spielberg. The Holocaust. Holocaust Park? The prospect does make you nervous. Everything about Steven Spielberg is commercial - his visual language, his dramatic sensibility, his tastes. Which is precisely why he's such a huge success ("Jaws," "E.T. " and "Jurassic Park," which has made something like $800 million worldwide). Even with the best of intentions, could a guy like Spielberg handle complex material like "Schindler's List" without turning it into a pop melodrama?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rarely do we hear an uplifting story from the Holocaust. That, perhaps, makes the story of Oskar Schindler all the more spectacular. He was director of a Nazi concentration camp during World War II, yet he is reputed to have saved more than 1,000 Jews from the gas chambers - more than any other single person. Thomas Keneally tells his story in Schindler's List, available on audio from Recorded Books for a $17.50 rental fee. The recording is long - 16 3/4 hours - but, like any good suspense story, it moves quickly.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1994 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
With next week's video release of Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning Schindler's List, interest in its central figure will once again be intense. HBO Video has anticipated that interest by releasing the British documentary Schindler (81 minutes, $49.99), produced, written and directed by Jon Blair and drawing on the book by Thomas Keneally, which also inspired the Spielberg movie. Schindler has been seen on PBS, but should attract an even wider audience on video. The tape, narrated by Dirk Bogarde, recalls many key scenes from Schindler's List but has the advantage of being able to explore Oskar Schindler's life before and after World War II. We learn that he was from an unremarkable Catholic family in Czechoslovakia; that his next-door neighbor was a rabbi with two sons, and that he adored being the center of attention.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oskar Schindler, who saved the lives of 1,200 Polish Jews during the Holocaust, has been celebrated for decades as a national hero in Israel. In 1963, he was named Righteous Among the Nations and is buried in a Jerusalem cemetery. Yet he was barely known to the American public until 1993, when his exploits were dramatized by actor Liam Neeson in Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List . Produced for a modest $22 million, the film went on to gross $321 worldwide and made the German Catholic industrialist a household name.
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NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Twenty years ago, sitting in a suburban movie theater watching Steven Spielberg's film Schindler's List , I had an awakening. The kind that ignites nerve endings. I knew that Jews, my people by birth and heritage, had been systematically killed by the Nazis simply because they were Jewish. But there was so much I didn't know. Certainly, one missing piece was Oskar Schindler, originally a war profiteer and member of the Nazi Party who ultimately turned hero, trying desperately to put a proverbial finger in the dike by hiring Jews to work in his factories.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
ACTOR LIAM NEESON will be in town tonight to introduce a 20th-anniversary screening of "Schindler's List" at the Prince Music Theater. Neeson was nominated for an Oscar for his portrayal of Oskar Schindler, who saved the lives of thousands of Jews during World War II by employing them in his factories. The 1993 film went on to win seven coveted golden bald men, including one for director Steven Spielberg , who spent some of his formative years in South Jersey. The screening benefits the USC Shoah Foundation, founded by Spielberg after he made "Schindler's List.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oskar Schindler, who saved the lives of 1,200 Polish Jews during the Holocaust, has been celebrated for decades as a national hero in Israel. In 1963, he was named Righteous Among the Nations and is buried in a Jerusalem cemetery. Yet he was barely known to the American public until 1993, when his exploits were dramatized by actor Liam Neeson in Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List . Produced for a modest $22 million, the film went on to gross $321 worldwide and made the German Catholic industrialist a household name.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY MICHAEL O'SULLIVAN, Washington Post
THE DOCUMENTARY "No Place on Earth" doesn't seem as if it should work quite as well as it does. A History Channel production, the tale of Ukrainian Jews who survived in underground caves for 511 days while hiding from the Nazis during World War II is structured around lengthy, foreign-language re-enactments of the events featuring costumed performers. Why not just commit to the undeniably thrilling theatricality of the story and make a fictionalized dramatic feature? Instead, Emmy-winning documentarian Janet Tobias ("Life 360")
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Leon Leyson, 83, who was the youngest of 1,100 Jews saved from the Nazis by Oskar Schindler, died Saturday in Whittier, Calif., after a four-year battle with lymphoma, his daughter, Stacy Wilfong, told the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Leyson was nearly 10 when Germany invaded Poland in 1939. Six months later, his family was sent to a ghetto in Krakow. He survived as mass killings and deportations to concentration camps escalated. Mr. Leyson, who lost two brothers during the Holocaust, at 13 was the youngest of the Jewish workers Schindler, an industrialist, saved by declaring them necessary for production at his factories.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2011 | By Gail Braccidiferro, For The Inquirer
Listening to the white-haired men and women on the screen talk about being forced into slave labor and watching their friends and family members be brutalized and carted off to concentration camps, it is easy to think these people could have been my parents, grandparents, or friends. That's just the point. These ordinary residents of Krakow, Poland, interviewed for a documentary film decades after the Nazi occupation of their lovely, historic city, are Everyman and Everywoman.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Argentine government restored a $900-a-month pension last week to the widow of the man featured in the film Schindler's List. A change of government in December disrupted the payment to Emilie Schindler, ordered last year by former President Carlos Menem. German industrialist Oskar Schindler is credited with saving nearly 1,300 Polish Jews from Nazi concentration camps by drawing up lists of fictitious jobs to convince the German authorities that the "workers" were essential to the war effort.
NEWS
October 29, 1996 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a warm summer day in 1942 when two trucks driven by German soldiers stopped on a street where Sol Urbach was walking. Urbach, 15, was one of about 40,000 Jews who had been sent to the ghetto of Krakow, Poland. He was one of 100 people loaded onto the trucks. "We didn't know whether we were being taken out to be shot, or to a concentration camp," Urbach, now 70, recalled, speaking to students recently at the College of New Jersey in Trenton. "Nobody told Jews where they were going.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1994 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
With next week's video release of Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning Schindler's List, interest in its central figure will once again be intense. HBO Video has anticipated that interest by releasing the British documentary Schindler (81 minutes, $49.99), produced, written and directed by Jon Blair and drawing on the book by Thomas Keneally, which also inspired the Spielberg movie. Schindler has been seen on PBS, but should attract an even wider audience on video. The tape, narrated by Dirk Bogarde, recalls many key scenes from Schindler's List but has the advantage of being able to explore Oskar Schindler's life before and after World War II. We learn that he was from an unremarkable Catholic family in Czechoslovakia; that his next-door neighbor was a rabbi with two sons, and that he adored being the center of attention.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | BY JACK McKINNEY
In the wake of the seven Oscars won by Steven Spielberg's film, most readers are at least roughly familiar with the story of "Schindler's List. " Much has been written about Oskar Schindler, the Sudeten-German who saved over a thousand Jews by listing them as skilled, essential workers in factories he operated in Nazi-occupied Poland. But what of Itzhak Stern, the quiet Jewish accountant who actually ran the business while Schindler wined and dined the Nazis to divert their attention from his rescue project?
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