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Osteopathic Medicine

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NEWS
June 8, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
H. Harvey Koenig, 62, a Mount Holly osteopathic physician and longtime Rancocas Hospital staff member, died of primary systemic amyloidosis Tuesday at Virtua-Memorial Hospital Burlington County, Mount Holly. He had lived in Moorestown since 1975. He previously resided in Willingboro and Philadelphia and was born and raised in Worcester, Mass. Dr. Koenig had maintained a private general practice in Mount Holly since 1975. He practiced medicine for 33 years, including eight years in Willingboro.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
A lawsuit filed in federal court in Camden on Monday alleges that the American Osteopathic Association illegally requires doctors of osteopathic medicine to buy membership in the Chicago organization in order to be board certified. The 23-page lawsuit, filed by attorneys at Duane Morris L.L.P., seeks class-action status. It says the class is comprised of more than 32,000 doctors of osteopathic medicine who have board certifications through the American Osteopathic Association. The full price for an annual membership is $683.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Lauren Noto-Bell, For The Inquirer
Q: How can osteopathic medicine help my cold and sinus symptoms? A: All physicians (M.D.s and D.O.s) get the same general training in medical school. Osteopathic physicians also get extensive training called osteopathic manipulative medicine, which focuses on the musculoskeletal system and its connection from head to toe and from outside in. Osteopathic physicians learn many ways - collectively called osteopathic manipulative treatment - to use their hands to find restrictions and blockages in the body and correct them to improve function.
NEWS
April 10, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Osteopathic doctor Ida C. Schmidt, 95, of Glenside, said more than once that she wanted to be buried with her treatment table "in case St. Peter has sciatica. " She died of congestive heart failure and pneumonia Sunday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Her path to becoming an osteopath began after she was hit by a car when she was 5. She cracked three vertebrae, spent months in traction, and afterward suffered sciatic nerve pain. A doctor from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy, which was on Pine Street, relieved her pain.
NEWS
March 6, 2016
An East Falls doctor has been charged with a felony relating to the illegal issuance of prescriptions, the Pennsylvania State Police announced Friday. Edwin Rothman, 82, a doctor of osteopathic medicine with an office at 4209 Ridge Avenue, had been under investigation by the state police's Bureau of Criminal Investigation since 2013. Trooper Adam Reed said an undercover operation found that Rothman was handing out prescriptions for Percocet and other painkillers to people "without a valid reason ... in exchange for cash.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Berger, 62, of Northeast Philadelphia, associate dean of undergraduate medical education at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, died Monday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Dr. Berger received his bachelor's degree from Temple University and his doctor of osteopathy degree from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1958. He completed a fellowship in neurological pediatrics at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. He became a full professor at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1984.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Matthew Schure, president and chief executive officer of Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, will retire in June 2014, the college announced Monday. The college has begun a search for his replacement. Schure, 64, has been at the helm since 2001. "His service to PCOM has helped position the college for long-term success in fulfillment of the institution's teaching, research, and service missions," board chair Paul W. McGloin said in a statement. - Susan Snyder
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
F. Munro Purse, 86, of Wynnewood, a retired pediatrician and professor emeritus at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, died of cardiac arrest Saturday at Graduate Health System City Avenue Hospital. Dr. Purse was in private practice on the Main Line for 55 years, first in Narberth and later in Wynnewood. He taught at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine for more than 50 years and was affiliated with the Osteopathic Medical Center (now the Graduate Health System City Avenue Hospital)
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul T. Lloyd, 94, an osteopathic physician who pioneered the use of radiation therapy, died Saturday at his home in Wayne. Dr. Lloyd was professor emeritus of radiology at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM), where he had been teaching since 1924. As early as 1930, Dr. Lloyd initiated routine X-ray screenings at the college to detect breast cancer. In 1934, he introduced a post-treatment follow-up program for cancer patients. "He was the father of radiology here at PCOM," said Dr. Albert D'Alonzo, chief of the college's division of cardiology.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lester Eisenberg, 88, professor emeritus of obstetrics and gynecology at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, died Tuesday of pneumonia at Union Hospital in Elkton, Md. He was a resident of Calvert Manor, a health-care center in Rising Sun, Md. Dr. Eisenberg devoted more than 30 years of his medical career to the college. He also practiced at Osteopathic Hospital of Philadelphia, now City Avenue Hospital. A tailor's son born and raised in Philadelphia, he graduated from Central High School and attended Temple University before graduating from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1938.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | Erik Polan, D.O., For The Inquirer
Q. How can I protect myself and my family from Zika and other mosquito-borne illnesses? A. The Zika virus has reached U.S. shores with numerous cases reported in a neighborhood in Miami. Many people who contract the disease never show symptoms (which are generally mild and can include fever, rash and joint aches and pains), but when symptoms do appear, they usually resolve themselves. Zika's greatest threat is to pregnant women; the disease can cause serious birth defects in babies whose mothers were infected during pregnancy.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
A lawsuit filed in federal court in Camden on Monday alleges that the American Osteopathic Association illegally requires doctors of osteopathic medicine to buy membership in the Chicago organization in order to be board certified. The 23-page lawsuit, filed by attorneys at Duane Morris L.L.P., seeks class-action status. It says the class is comprised of more than 32,000 doctors of osteopathic medicine who have board certifications through the American Osteopathic Association. The full price for an annual membership is $683.
SPORTS
June 22, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Being from Langhorne, Ryan Arcidiacono said playing for the 76ers would mean the world to him. The point guard has already crossed off one item on his bucket list by playing a starring role for his beloved NCAA Division I champion Villanova Wildcats. But, even before he became a Wildcat, Arcidiacono thought it would be awesome to eventually play for the Sixers. So he gave the Sixers executives, coaches, scouts, and consultant Jerry Colangelo an up-close glimpse of his skills during a pre-draft workout Monday at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2016
Kenneth I. Trujillo, La-Toya Pope Hackney , and Wendell E. Pritchett have been elected to the board of the public broadcaster and media provider WHYY, Philadelphia. Trujillo is a partner in the Philadelphia office of Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis L.L.P. Pope Hackney is assistant general counsel for TE Connectivity Ltd. (formerly Tyco Electronics). Pritchett is a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania who also served as deputy chief of staff and director of policy for Mayor Michael Nutter.
SPORTS
June 3, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Former Imhotep Charter standout Brandon Austin is one of six prospects who will participate Thursday in a pre-draft workout for the 76ers at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. The 6-foot-7 guard last played collegiately in 2014-15, leading Northwest Florida State to the NJCAA Division I championship. He signed with Providence out of high school and later transferred to Oregon. He was dismissed from both Division I schools amid allegations of sexual assault, but he was not indicted or charged in either case.
SPORTS
June 1, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
PERHAPS IT WAS just the slightest of hints, and certainly, if so, one given subconsciously. After six borderline NBA hopefuls worked out for the 76ers Monday at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, coach Brett Brown talked with the gathered media. The questions weren't about the little-known players, but rather, who the team might draft on June 23 with the top overall selection. Brown mentioned the names of Duke's Brandon Ingram, Oklahoma's Buddy Hield, Providence's Kris Dunn.
SPORTS
May 31, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Former Weber State power forward Joel Bolomboy and former Boise State forward James Webb III are among the headliners for a 76ers pre-draft workout Monday at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Both players could be taken late in the second round of the June 23 NBA draft. Guard Brannen Greene (Kansas), shooting guard Daniel House (Texas A&M), guard Tim Quarterman (LSU) and point guard Isaiah Taylor (Texas) also will participate. Last season, Bolomboy averaged 17.1 points and 12.6 rebounds and was named Big Sky Conference player of the year and defensive player of the year.
SPORTS
April 8, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
THE FIRE that was burning in the eyes of 76ers coach Brett Brown in the early afternoon Thursday was very similar to the look he has when roaming the sideline late in games. Though he was standing on the court at the Sixers' practice facility at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Brown wasn't overseeing offensive sets or implementing defensive strategies. He was talking about the sudden resignation of the man who hired him. He was relaying the disappointment he felt. He seemed, well, a little bit pissed.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Leonard B. Segal took an unusual road to becoming a surgeon, daughter Nina said. He repaired cars to help pay for the tuition. He was the first in his family to go to college, she said, and then "put himself through medical school. " "He worked as a car mechanic" and "spent summers in the Catskills and Atlantic City" as a waiter. For decades, she said, fixing cars was "one of the things he loved. " On Tuesday, March 8, Dr. Segal, 84, of Cherry Hill, general surgery chair at the former Delaware Valley Medical Center in Langhorne from 1980 to 1988, died at home of complications from a blood disease.
NEWS
March 6, 2016
An East Falls doctor has been charged with a felony relating to the illegal issuance of prescriptions, the Pennsylvania State Police announced Friday. Edwin Rothman, 82, a doctor of osteopathic medicine with an office at 4209 Ridge Avenue, had been under investigation by the state police's Bureau of Criminal Investigation since 2013. Trooper Adam Reed said an undercover operation found that Rothman was handing out prescriptions for Percocet and other painkillers to people "without a valid reason ... in exchange for cash.
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