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NEWS
August 23, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - The current West Nile outbreak could be one of the largest in U.S. history, with four times the usual number of cases for this time of year, federal health officials said Wednesday. It's still too early to say how bad the year will end up because most infections are reported in August and September. But never before have so many illnesses been reported this early, said Dr. Lyle Petersen, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So far, 1,118 illnesses have been reported, about half of them in Texas.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
A recent outbreak of viral meningitis in Montgomery County means that Bucks County residents should be more careful but should not be gripped with fear, said Dr. Lewis D. Polk, director of the Bucks County Health Department. "I don't think it's justified to have panic in the streets," Polk said. "The kind that we're having here apparently is not the kind that kills you and not the kind that causes serious problems. Other kinds can. " The state health department issued a public warning Wednesday after confirming about 150 cases of meningitis in Berks, Dauphin, Delaware, Montgomery and York Counties since mid-June.
SPORTS
November 21, 1988 | By Frank Bertucci, Special to the Daily News
You can officially add the outbreak of Trojan Measles to the lore of the USC-UCLA football bash. While some Los Angeles health officials were suggesting that Saturday's game should be postponed because Rodney Peete could transmit measles to everyone in attendance in the Rose Bowl, USC's senior quarterback instead gave the 100,741 in the stands and a national television audience a dose of Heismanitis by leading the second-ranked Trojans to a...
NEWS
June 1, 2011 | By David Rising and Maria Cheng, Associated Press
BERLIN - A large and unprecedented outbreak of bacterial infections linked to contaminated vegetables claimed two more lives in Europe on Tuesday, driving the death toll to 16. The number of sick rose to more than 1,150 people in at least eight nations. Nearly 400 people in Germany were battling a potentially fatal version of the infection that attacks the kidneys and kills up to 5 percent of patients. A U.S. expert said doctors had never seen so many cases of the condition, hemolytic uremic syndrome, tied to a foodborne outbreak.
NEWS
April 10, 1987 | By ANN GERHART and GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writers
A 14th death in the Philadelphia area since December has been attributed to the sometimes-fatal disease listeriosis, an epidemiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said yesterday. Dr. Benjamin Schwartz said, however, that he thought it was "unlikely" that the local outbreak would claim any more deaths. "Virtually every" hospital in the area already has been canvassed, he said. Schwartz said the 14th death occurred in February but was diagnosed as listeriosis yesterday.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
An outbreak of the deadly AIDS virus among several dozen young children in a southern Russian city has caused panic among local residents, some of whom wanted to burn down the homes of those who had been infected, Soviet officials disclosed yesterday. Since the outbreak was first reported in January, 49 people - 41 of them children - have contracted the AIDS-causing HIV virus in the city of Elista, in the Russian Republic near the Caspian Sea, Deputy Health Minister Alexander Kondrusev said at a news conference.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
Months after Mayfair residents were plagued by slashed tires, two more Northeast Philadelphia neighborhoods have been victimized by a similar outbreak. Philadelphia police are investigating vandalization of almost a dozen cars Saturday night in Port Richmond and six more vehicles Sunday night in the area of Rosalie and Bingham Streets in Lawncrest. Police have not said if the latest tire slashings are related and no arrests have been made. In the previous outbreak, Mayfair residents were stunned in April when one of their neighbors, David Toledo, 44, was charged with vandalizing 55 tires.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden's schools superintendent, Dr. Arnold Webster, said last night that an outbreak of hepatitis type A among four Camden students last week had not spread and was under control. He said the outbreak was reported about a week ago at Lanning Square and Yorkshire Elementary Schools, after parents of the four students took the ill children to local health clinics. The disease has flulike symptoms and causes a yellow discoloration of body tissues and fluids. Webster said that the students who contracted the disease had been staying at the Anna Samples Home, a shelter for the homeless that is operated by the Volunteers of America.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
An outbreak of measles in Gloucester County has public health officials scrambling to contain the contagious disease. Since March, 84 measles cases have been reported in the county; 24 have been confirmed, health officials said. No deaths have been reported, but 22 people have been hospitalized, including three in the last week. Last week, 375 students and faculty at Paulsboro High School received immunization shots after a third case was confirmed at the school. Three other schools - including Woodbury and Deptford high schools - each have two confirmed cases, but a third is needed before health officials immunize students and staff at a school.
NEWS
January 25, 1986 | By Meredith M. Henry, Special to the Inquirer
Sixteen cases of chancroid, a rare and contagious sexually transmitted disease, have been reported in Southeastern Pennsylvania since November, according to the state Department of Health. Denise Johnson, assistant program director in the division of sexually transmitted diseases, said yesterday that the cases had been limited to Chester and Berks Counties. "It's considered an outbreak because we just don't see much chancroid around," Johnson said. She said that in 1983 a total of 847 cases were reported in the United States, with most of them in New York, Georgia, Florida and California.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 9, 2016
By Amesh Adalja In the runup to the Olympics, many people considered Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the epicenter of the current Zika virus outbreak. Zika has already affected thousands of Americans because of ordinary travel from areas in which the main vector causing the outbreak, the Aedes aegypti mosquito, harbors the virus. Some have warned that the Olympic Games should be avoided because the mass travel associated with the event will serve as a catalyst for Zika's proliferation in the United States.
NEWS
July 22, 2016
By Marc P. Weingarten It seems all too obvious today, 40 years after the Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Philadelphia that led to the discovery of the eponymous Legionella bacteria. We've learned Legionnaires' is transmitted when a person breathes in aerosolized water containing the bacteria. We've learned the bacteria can grow in whirlpool spas, misting equipment, cooling towers, showers, decorative fountains, and other places where water is circulated. And we've learned that people with compromised pulmonary systems - the elderly, smokers, and individuals with weakened immunological systems due to cancer or diabetes - are especially at risk.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2016 | By Chad Terhune, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
The Food and Drug Administration has dropped a recall of about 2,800 scope-cleaning machines in use at hospitals and clinics nationwide despite a finding by a top agency scientist last year that the action was "necessary to protect public health. " The FDA had ordered the equipment off the market in November because it said that Custom Ultrasonics of Ivyland, Bucks County, had repeatedly violated federal safety laws and that those lapses could raise the risk of infection for patients.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Norovirus is what caused more than 12 percent of Ursinus College's student body to get sick last week, officials said Monday. Test results confirmed the highly contagious virus as the culprit behind the stomach illness that swept across the Collegeville campus, sickening at least 214 students, plus faculty and staff, since last Tuesday. "This is the agent we have suspected since this outbreak began," said Montgomery County Commissioner Valerie Arkoosh, a physician and interim medical director of the county health department.
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Jill Castellano, Staff Writer
Ten more Ursinus College students reported symptoms of a stomach virus this weekend, bringing the total number of reports since Tuesday night to around 200, or 12 percent of the student population, a college official said Sunday. The small liberal arts college is still working with health officials to determine if the cause of the outbreak is food-borne or person-to-person contact. Tests of affected students could take up to a week. In a new program called called JeffConnect On-Demand Virtual Care, Jefferson University Hospital is now offering Ursinus students free video consultations with emergency care doctors through Feb. 29. University officials are encouraging students to use the Virtual Care program if they have similar symptoms to those reported in the outbreak - including diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain - which can help them know if they should seek immediate care or wait out the symptoms.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Over the past three weeks in Colombia, which has the second-highest number of Zika infections in the world, Philadelphia Ob/Gyn Jack Ludmir noticed something interesting: No fear. "I haven't seen, 'Oh, my God! I'm not going to go in there' because of that [Zika-infected] patient," said Ludmir, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at Pennsylvania Hospital, who has been working to improve health care in Colombia for 16 years. "That strikes me the most. " There have been other surprises, too, in a nation where more than 3,100 pregnant women are infected with Zika.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trees and wires came down in parts of Chester County, and a gust of 64 m.p.h. was measured in Montgomery County as a fresh batch of strong thunderstorms rumbled through parts of the region on Tuesday. However, so far they have lacked the ferocity and staying power of last week's. PECO hasn't reported any big problems -- Chester County was reporting only about 120 outages -- and the storms mostly have spared South Jersey, which is still recovering from the horrific outbreak of June 23. Still, a severe-thunderstorm watch for possible high winds and hail remains in effect until 8 p.m. for most of the region, as is a flood advisory for Philadelphia; all of Delaware, Chester, and Montgomery Counties, and a slice of Bucks County.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Staff Writer
AN OUTBREAK OF infection in the past two weeks has closed the Pennsylvania SPCA adoption center on Erie Avenue near B Street in North Philadelphia. The upper-respiratory infection is not yet identified, according to PSPCA communications director Liz Romaine. It appears to affect dogs, but not cats or humans. Quarantine measures have been put into place. The illness was noticed March 12, leading to a shutdown of the entire building for disinfection, said Romaine. The wellness-and-grooming area was reopened the next day, and the surgery room was reopened March 14. Those areas are sealed off from the adoption and kennel areas, she said.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A model of endoscope that has been linked to outbreaks of deadly, drug-resistant bacteria at hospitals in Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and elsewhere was on the market for years without clearance, the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday. The device in question is a hard-to-clean type of duodenoscope marketed since 2010 by Olympus Corp., which has its U.S. headquarters in the Lehigh Valley. Also Wednesday, a second Los Angeles hospital reported that four patients had tested positive for this type of "superbug" bacteria after being treated with a duodenoscope.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three sets of parents called Sue Kressly's pediatric practice in Bucks County over the weekend with the same extraordinary question: Their children were not yet one year old, the minimum age to receive the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine. Could they get the MMR earlier? "I think it's a great sign," said Kressly, Pennsylvania chapter president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. "The conversation is changing from whether vaccines can do harm to one about how vaccines can protect you. " For years, pediatricians have been trying to persuade some parents that vaccines protect against diseases that are no longer commonly seen.
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