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Outer Banks

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NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Bruce Beans, Special to The Inquirer
Seven years ago, teenagers in this pristine area of the northern Outer Banks sported T-shirts complaining that they were "Stuck in Duck. " The look on their faces said it wasn't a vacation but was a prison sentence. Even I - whose idea of the perfect vacation spot is a Canadian lake 25 miles from the nearest road - had to admit they had a point. Aside from a small market and deli, one art gallery and an old duck-decoy woodcarver's shop, you had to spend as much as half an hour motoring south into Kitty Hawk or Nags Head for food, restaurants or shops, or entertainment of any kind.
NEWS
August 31, 1999 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Hurricane Dennis scared tourists, made beach houses sway like palm trees and pushed the water of Currituck Sound a good quarter of a mile west, leaving boats resting on the exposed bottom. That last thing has storm watchers worried. As Dennis moves away, its wind gusts of up to 98 mph - as clocked at Cape Hatteras - will begin pushing Currituck Sound back toward this narrow stretch of sand that separates the Sound from the Atlantic Ocean. "We're concerned about sound-side flooding," said Lt. Anthony Smith, of the Dare County sheriff's office.
NEWS
September 1, 2002 | By Donald D. Groff FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the routes between mainland North Carolina and the Outer Banks just got more inviting to motorists with the opening of a four-lane, 5.2-mile bridge between Manns Harbor on the mainland and Manteo, on Roanoke Island. The new Dare County bridge, the longest in the state, bypasses traditional traffic jams around Manteo, the county seat, and tourism officials hope it will help lure regional visitors who might otherwise head for the state's easier-to-reach southern shore areas.
TRAVEL
May 26, 2013 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
DUCK, N.C. - My family and I felt right at home from the minute we arrived at this seaside town near the northern end of North Carolina's Outer Banks. Two of the first people we met were a mother from Warminster and her grown daughter from Levittown, shopping in a Rite-Aid for items we each had neglected to pack. At a seafood restaurant, a young family at the next table turned out to be from Levittown - the father's Phillies cap was a conversation-starter. And when we tried to phone in an order for barbecue, I accidentally dialed the restaurant's sister eatery - in New Britain, Central Bucks County.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As we crossed the Atlantic Beach Bridge and entered this seaside resort for the first time, we were greeted by neon lights and an amazing sight: Two people shooting skyward, 150 feet into the air, then hurtling almost to the ground before bouncing up again, nearly as high as the first time. "This is going to be a fun week," I said as I struggled to keep one eye on the road and the other on the two people riding the Slingshot, the featured attraction at the entrance to this resort town.
NEWS
April 11, 2004 | By Patricia Weil Coates FOR THE INQUIRER
Beach-lovers - many of them from the Philadelphia area - are drawn to the Outer Banks of North Carolina by the hundreds of thousands each week during the summer season, eager to soak up the sun and play in the Atlantic surf. What most don't know, however, is that less than 10 miles from the busy resort areas of Nags Head and Kill Devil Hills is a tranquil, green island with a delightful variety of things to do that don't require baking on the beach or waiting in line at crowded restaurants.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Separated by a creek from U.S. Highway 158 and its bloated beach development sits Colington Island, a marshy speck of land that has clung to many of the customs that its Outer Banks neighbors paved over decades ago. No chain hotels, fast-food restaurants or condominium complexes occupy the 5-square-mile island, which juts westward from Kill Devil Hills into the Albemarle Sound. Even with an influx of subdivisions and second-home owners, Colington has remained the domain of crabbers, carpenters and charter-boat captains who have worked Carolina's barrier islands for generations.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | By Susan VanDongen, FOR THE INQUIRER
My significant other wanted to show me his favorite place in the world. The most beautiful, romantic, spot I could imagine. Paradise. And we would travel there on our first vacation together. So, I'm thinking maybe Paris? Prague? London? What should I pack? Sophisticated clothes for touring the museums, lots of urban black matte for the cafes, maybe a strapless gown in case we do one special, elegant night? "You're going to need waders," John said, "and probably some kind of waterproof pouch for lures, and to keep your bait handy.
SPORTS
March 17, 2015 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
"She's been a rock for us," Terry Rakowsky says. The words carry a lot of weight when the coach of the Central Bucks West girls' basketball team talks about senior Peyton Traina. The sentence takes on a whole new significance when one learns what the guard has been through. It started in July. The Trainas - Mike, Julie, and their five children, Peyton, Jack, Luke, Casey, and Abby - were on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Mike, an active 44-year-old former basketball player at Brown, suffered a stroke on the beach.
NEWS
May 16, 2010
Adventure Learning Getaways From HotelsCombined.com: Orlando Washington Chicago San Francisco Bay area New York City Williamsburg, Va. Los Angeles Outer Banks, N.C. Atlanta Houston Geoquiz Fredericksburg, site of a major Civil War battle in 1862, is on the Rappahannock River in which state? (Answer below) SOURCES: HotelsCombined.com, Chicago Tribune
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
AFTER playing larger-than-life characters like Red, queen of the kitchen in "Orange Is the New Black," and Admiral Janeway in "Star Trek: Voyager," actress Kate Mulgrew has taken on a new challenge - telling her life's story in her book, Born With Teeth: A Memoir (Little, Brown & Co.). "I'll be 60 years old at the end of this month," Mulgrew said in an interview with the Daily News . "For 40 years, I've been playing other characters. I've enjoyed it. I've loved it. I've been seriously committed to it. But there comes a moment, when it comes, to step out as one's self.
SPORTS
March 17, 2015 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
"She's been a rock for us," Terry Rakowsky says. The words carry a lot of weight when the coach of the Central Bucks West girls' basketball team talks about senior Peyton Traina. The sentence takes on a whole new significance when one learns what the guard has been through. It started in July. The Trainas - Mike, Julie, and their five children, Peyton, Jack, Luke, Casey, and Abby - were on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Mike, an active 44-year-old former basketball player at Brown, suffered a stroke on the beach.
REAL_ESTATE
March 8, 2015 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 1991, Kristin and Steve Stoughton were 24 and engaged to be married. Knowing that they wanted to buy an older house, Steve's employer made a bold suggestion. The boss, a residential developer, was planning to build several houses on a tract in Fort Washington. Would Steve and his fiancee be interested in buying a battered farmhouse and barn on the site? Sure would. The barn and the small three-story dwelling dated to the late 1840s. Two-story additions were added in the 1920s and 1940s.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
PATRICIA HOSGOOD was such a dedicated anti-abortion activist that she didn't mind occasionally being arrested for demonstrating a little too fervently at an abortion clinic. She finally gave it up when a grandchild said, "Grandmom, please stop being thrown in jail. " But Patricia was a woman of strong opinions when it came to a cause close to her heart. If it meant handcuffs and being dragged away by cops, Patricia was willing to sacrifice a bit of comfort. Her husband, Dennis, was stoic about it. On two of the three occasions she was arrested, he made the trek to the 8th District police station at Academy and Red Lion roads to pick her up. A friend got her the third time.
TRAVEL
October 13, 2014 | By Julie Pratt and Steve Liskov, For The Inquirer
The summer of 2014 is certainly one for the record books. My boyfriend and I got the crazy idea to take a cross-country trip together. We shrugged off the astonished faces of all our friends as we prepared ourselves. We had money saved, a chunk of time, and a generalized game plan. We packed our car full of suitcases, food, and blankets; we were ready to hit the road. My boyfriend and I left from our homestead in the northeast corner of Pennsylvania. Slowly, we made our way down the East Coast.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poised to become the season's first Atlantic hurricane by day's end Thursday, Tropical Storm Arthur was forecast to hit the North Carolina coast with high winds and heavy rains and have at least an indirect effect on the Philadelphia region. Hurricane warnings were posted for the Outer Banks and the entire North Carolina coast, and although Arthur should scoot well offshore, some of its moisture could add juice to rains around here, the National Weather Service says. A flash-flood watch was in effect from Thursday morning until noon Friday for Philadelphia and its adjacent counties, where 1 to 3 inches of rain were possible.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ & DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writers madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
IN A MONTH, Ashley Wilson and Lindsay Vandermay, both 29, of Fairmount, will celebrate yet again. Having visited City Hall after work yesterday to receive their marriage license, the two women will walk down an aisle in the Outer Banks - the wedding they've been planning for the past two years of their five-year relationship. "For me, it just feels like we're everyone else," Wilson said after obtaining the license. She was referring to U.S. District Judge John E. Jones III's decision to strike down Pennsylvania's 1996 ban on same-sex marriage, which he called "unconstitutional" in a statement issued yesterday.
TRAVEL
December 30, 2013 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
DAYTON, Ohio - North Carolina license plates proudly declare "First in Flight," while Ohio's offer the competing slogan "Birthplace of Aviation. " In this friendly interstate rivalry for bragging rights over the dawn of aviation, who's right or, in this case, Wright? It's true that Wilbur and Orville Wright were attracted by the windswept dunes of North Carolina's Outer Banks to achieve man's first powered flight. As Orville said in a note, "We came down here for wind and sand and we have got them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Joe started Valentine's Day 2009 with a young coworker's funeral. The sadness of that loss made the holiday of hearts even worse than then-single Joe anticipated. But he and some close friends had a plan to get through it: a Boston pub-crawl. "Everyone else was out on dinner dates and had love, and we were just going to go out and have a good time," he said. His pal DJ arrived at Joe's apartment with two women he'd never met, but had heard about: DJ's "hot cousins from New Jersey.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Y. Cooper III, 88, emeritus professor in the department of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania and a longtime surgical researcher, died Friday, Aug. 2, of cancer at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. A 1948 graduate of Penn's medical school, Dr. Cooper was widely known for his work on the cytochrome P-450, a series of enzymes involved in drug metabolism. In layman's terms, Dr. Cooper was looking at how the enzymes acquired the ability to perform biological functions in the body, and why. The goal was to better understand how medicines break down once they are taken or administered.
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