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Outer Space

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NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
In space, no one can hear you scream when your battery dies. Out there, options are pretty limited. "In space, there are very limited power sources. You either have to carry your batteries with you - which is in most cases impractical - or by and large in space, you would rely on light, on sun," said Robi Polikar, head of the electrical and computer engineering department at Rowan University. And there are all those other issues to think about when it comes to electronics: the physical size of the equipment (the larger and heavier, the harder to get into space)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1999 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A retelling of the Cinderella story tops this week's list of new movies on video. Ever After 1/2 (1998) (Fox) $19.98. 101 minutes. Drew Barrymore, Anjelica Huston, Dougray Scott, Patrick Godfrey. Breathing fresh air into the stale saga of Cinderella, Ever After stars Barrymore as the resourceful chargirl who doesn't need a prince to save her, but does have a hand in saving a certain Prince Henry. Enough derring-do for adventurers, and enough courtship to send romantics into raptures.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | By Mac Daniel, Special to The Inquirer
Cheltenham teacher Roberta Jacoby ventured to Ohio last month to ponder some weighty questions on a weightless matter. Can you microwave brownies in outer space? And does a Slinky actually slink in the final frontier? Those questions can't be answered by just anyone, as Jacoby knows after spending two weeks in a NASA program that forced a select group of teachers to wrack their brains over such intergalactic matters. "It was mind-boggling," Jacoby said. "What's going on in the space industry is amazing.
REAL_ESTATE
October 25, 1991 | By Marguerite P. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
HILLCREST MEADOWS Worcester Township, Montgomery County 215-643-1289 Hillcrest Meadows should suit suburban folks who have a hankering for the city's bright lights. The view from some second-floor bedrooms at the development offers new suburbanites a faint glimpse of what they left behind. On a clear night, Liberty Place glows dimly in the distance. But little else about Hillcrest Meadows is reminiscent of city living. For starters, the builders created room for people who need to store more than monks' garb in their closets.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Advances in computers, lasers and data processing have made it possible to launch the world's first systematic effort to search for extraterrestrial life in the universe, space experts said yesterday. "As our technology has advanced the possibilities have become ever more real," said James Powell, of Brookhaven National Laboratories in Upton, N.Y., at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia. Jill Tarter, an astronomer at the University of California at Berkeley, said that during the last 25 years 47 modest attempts have been made to search the heavens for signals emitted from other civilizations.
NEWS
December 12, 2011
Micah Zenko, 36, is no astronaut. A fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, he is an authority on "space junk," the orbiting debris left by disabled satellites, rocket boosters, and manned missions. Orbiting at thousands of miles per hour, a mere splinter holds the force to destroy a craft. So Zenko, concerned about the threat to the military and commercial satellites essential for modern life, in a recent CFR policy paper, proposed "A Code of Conduct for Outer Space.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | By John Stamper, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Ready for a break from the pressure cooker of everyday life? Then how about a little jaunt into outer space? Out-of-this-world tourism may be just around the corner, according to a report released yesterday by NASA and the Space Transportation Association, a private group that represents the interests of companies hoping to develop commercial space travel. "General public space travel and tourism has the potential to emerge as a large and growing commercial business in the early decades of the next century," the report said.
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine a constant free-falling feeling for four months. Now imagine feeling that way and also being denied sex, chocolate, a telephone, Monday Night Football, shopping. And cheesesteaks. No, this isn't hell. It's outer space. These are just some of the sacrifices three space pioneers will make, starting this week, to become the first men to live on the International Space Station. About 3 a.m. today Philadelphia time, an American astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts were scheduled to soar into space aboard a Russian rocket.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | By Elizabeth Judd, FOR THE INQUIRER
In 1988, President Bush made famous the phrase "a thousand points of light," a metaphor for the positive energy sparked by volunteers in America. In 1992, Streamlight Inc., a Norristown manufacturer of rechargeable portable lights, illuminated this ideal, literally and figuratively. In August, Streamlight donated an assortment of its products to survivors of Hurricane Andrew. The company sent 700 flashlights to the Salvation Army of South Florida and 100 to parishes in Louisiana.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Schoolchildren in Camden and Audubon have no doubt that humans will be traveling to Mars and maybe even living there within their lifetimes. The planet closest to Earth, which for previous generations was the stuff of science-fiction novels, comic books and B movies, has been demystified for a small group of fifth and sixth graders participating in a NASA-sponsored science program. "This could save us one day," said 11-year-old Sam Bednarchik, a sixth grader at Haviland Avenue School in Audubon.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
In space, no one can hear you scream when your battery dies. Out there, options are pretty limited. "In space, there are very limited power sources. You either have to carry your batteries with you - which is in most cases impractical - or by and large in space, you would rely on light, on sun," said Robi Polikar, head of the electrical and computer engineering department at Rowan University. And there are all those other issues to think about when it comes to electronics: the physical size of the equipment (the larger and heavier, the harder to get into space)
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
ABC will go back in time while Amazon Studios hops over to London, in two shows that explore the families we create when we're forced into extraordinary circumstances. We have lift-off . . . Behind every great early-space pioneer was a great, Jell-O-salad-making woman. So says The Astronaut Wives Club , ABC's new period drama about the wives of the first astronauts. Itpremieres at 8 p.m. Thursday. Based on Lily Koppel's book, The Astronaut Wives Club focuses each of its episodes on one of the women married to a member of the Mercury Seven.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015
The long: Seventies-born, Emmy-winning educational segue that once interrupted Saturday morning cartoons takes to the stage in a story that aims its catchy rock 'n' roll hits squarely and energetically at elementary schoolers. The short: Kids learn. Parents reminisce. The demo: Ages 5 to 12. The length: One quick hour. The plot: A teacher named Tom dreams up five fantastical Technicolor characters the night before his first class. The set: Tom's studio apartment alternately transforms into Independence Hall, the Capitol building, a map of the USA and, during a visit from Interplanet Janet, outer space.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - If spring 2015's runway looks - shown last September - were all about pared down, futuristic silhouettes, expect this fall's fashions to take you on a journey to outer space. At this year's Fall Fashion Week, ending Thursday in New York, three-quarter length skirts and cocoon coats have been both cozy and commanding. Expect to see midriff top and matching skirt (or pant) ensembles - also among the week's top looks - trending from spring into fall. It seems the higher-waisted - and the skinnier - the pants, the better, but mini bell bottoms will likely replace those tapered at the ankles.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
FOR AT LEAST a century we've been beaming our pop culture into deep space, which probably explains why we've gotten no official visits from aliens. If there is intelligent life out there, watching "Gilligan's Island" and listening to the Starland Vocal Band, surely they'll skip the Milky Way altogether. At least that would be a reasonable guess. The funny, kicky "Guardians of the Galaxy" offers a different take - that whatever magic resides in an '80s mix-tape could save the universe.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It can't be easy for sci-fi filmmakers to work in the shadows of such classics as 2001: A Space Odyssey or, for that matter, Alien . Two new films try, with mixed success. The latest masterpiece from acclaimed director Alfonso Cuarón ( Children of Men , Y Tu Mamá También ), Gravity is a tense two-character drama that has been nominated for 10 Academy Awards. It stars Sandra Bullock and George Clooney as the sole survivors of a disastrous explosion that wipes out the crew of a space shuttle who were assigned to make repairs to the Hubble Space Telescope.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many teenagers does it take to fill a test tube? If that test tube is going from Downingtown to outer space, the count is seven. One to hold the tube. Three or four to measure and dispense precise quantities of ingredients, and the rest to advise and interject spirited commentary. It took well over an hour, but you can hardly blame the 10th graders from Downingtown STEM Academy for taking their time. Their test tube contained an experiment scheduled to take off for the International Space Station on Dec. 17, and they had one shot to get it right.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clowns used to scare the daylights out of me. (OK, they still do.) They were uncanny, creepy creatures with the darkest and scariest of souls, - why else, I reasoned, would they need to hide behind so much garish face paint? Seems the Chiodo brothers felt the same way. Born in the Bronx and raised on Long Island, the dynamic filmmaking trio is responsible for the 1988 cult classic Killer Klowns From Outer Space , a delightfully schlocky horror comedy about a race of vicious, bloodthirsty invading aliens who look like circus clowns - but with very sharp teeth.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Joanna Pang, the longtime owner of the Trocadero, is a serious businesswoman, not given to superlative. Neither is respected film curator Josh Goldbloom. Yet, ask them about their newest joint venture and each turns gushing teen. "There's never been anything like this ever and the only word to describe it is awesome," exclaims Pang, talking about the summerlong Awesome Fest, with its mix of concerts, dressed-up live events, film screenings, and celebrity meet-and-greets - all around an '80s theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013
Creativity blossomed larger than a white water lily at this spring's end-of-year student fashion shows, where young designers sent versions of thrift-store chic and 1960s mod looks down their runways. Moore College of Art & Design senior Amanda Davis showed two collections, among the evening's highlights. Davis' urban-prep women's wear featured lettered sweaters and knee-length pleated skirts; it was voted most saleable. Her out-of-this-world evening wear, inspired by outer space, featured a bell-sleeved electric sheer gown that could outdo J.Lo.
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